Hey, I've Got Five On It!

Feb 12, 2012
Originally published on February 18, 2012 12:34 am

On-Air Challenge: Every answer is a familiar three-word phrase, name or title in which each word has five letters — for example, "Royal Opera House."

Last Week's Challenge: Name an animal. Add the letters "A" and "T," and rearrange the result to name another animal. These are both animals that might be found in a zoo, and the last letter of the first animal is the first letter of the last one.

Answer: If you add "A" and "T" to "gorilla," you can rearrange the letters to spell "alligator."

Winner: AElfwine Mischler of Cairo, Egypt

Next Week's Challenge from listener Kevin Roberts of Norcross, Ga.: Name two fictional characters — the first one good, the second one bad. Each is a one-word name. Drop the last letter of the name of the first character. Read the remaining letters in order from left to right. The result will be a world capital. What is it?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday at 3 p.m. Eastern.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. And that's right, it is time, once again, for the puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: Let's start with last week's challenge from the puzzle editor of the New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master, Will Shortz.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Name an animal. Add the letters A and T, rearrange the result to name another animal. They're both animals in a zoo. And the last letter of first animal is the first letter of the last one. What animals are these?

MARTIN: Well, more than 800 of you figured out the answer. And our randomly selected winner this week is AElfwine Mischler from Cairo, Egypt. And AElfwine joins us on the line now. Congratulations, AElfwine.

AELFWINE MISCHLER: Thank you.

MARTIN: And, AElfwine, we should say you are our first puzzle winner from Cairo. Congratulations on that, too. That's a milestone in and of itself.

MISCHLER: I like to be first.

MARTIN: So, before we get any further, I want to know what was the answer to last week's challenge?

MISCHLER: The first animal was gorilla. The second animal was alligator.

MARTIN: Well, well done. Congratulations on solving that. At this point, I want to introduce you to the puzzle editor of the New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master, Will Shortz. Good morning, Will.

SHORTZ: Morning, Rachel. And, AElfwine, congratulations.

MISCHLER: Thank you. Good morning.

MARTIN: And we should mention you're an American and you've been living in Cairo for the last 20 years. Are crossword puzzles something that Egyptians do?

MISCHLER: They have them in some of the newspapers but they're not very common. I myself don't do crossword puzzles. I'll do other types, anagrams or something.

MARTIN: OK. So, you wouldn't call yourself kind of a puzzler.

MISCHLER: I'm not a great puzzler.

MARTIN: Well, we'll put you to the test today with Will Shortz. Let's do it, Will. Go for it.

SHORTZ: All right. AElfwine, every answer today is a familiar three-word phrase, name or title in which each word has exactly five letters. Like - Royal Opera House.

MISCHLER: OK.

SHORTZ: OK. Number one is an old saying that's advice against rushing.

MISCHLER: Haste makes waste.

SHORTZ: Excellent. Women's tennis champ of the 1970s and '80s.

MISCHLER: Oh, oh, oh, Billie Jean King.

SHORTZ: No. She was big and she did have a three-word name but that's not five-by-five.

MISCHLER: That's not five letters. That's the only name I know.

SHORTZ: You know this one, Rachel?

MARTIN: Chris Evert Lloyd.

SHORTZ: There you go. Chris Evert Lloyd. Nice. Here's a more recent one: 2006 Meryl Streep film in which she plays a fashion editor with the.

MISCHLER: "Devil Wears (unintelligible)."

SHORTZ: "The Devil Wears Prada." Yeah. "The Devil Wears Prada."

MARTIN: Close enough, close enough.

SHORTZ: We count that one. An annual award announced in Oslo.

MISCHLER: The Nobel Peace Prize.

SHORTZ: That's it. The menace in "Jaws."

MISCHLER: What was the first word?

SHORTZ: Menace in "Jaws," in the movie "Jaws."

MISCHLER: Oh, great white shark.

SHORTZ: Great white shark is right.

MARTIN: Nicely done.

SHORTZ: Alternative to rye, pumpernickel and white.

MISCHLER: Something with a bagel.

SHORTZ: Not bagel, no. There's - you buy a loaf at the grocery. There's rye, pumpernickel, white. What's the fourth kind?

MARTIN: Nutritious - supposed to be nutritious.

MISCHLER: Oh, wheat. Whole wheat bread.

SHORTZ: Whole wheat bread is it.

MARTIN: Good job.

SHORTZ: Leukocytes, which help the immune system defend the body against infectious diseases.

MARTIN: Leukocytes.

MISCHLER: White blood cells.

SHORTZ: White blood cells, good.

MARTIN: Wow.

SHORTZ: And your last two answers are four-word phrases in which every word has five letters.

MARTIN: Ooh, mixing it up, Will.

SHORTZ: And your first one is professional D.C. group that grills the president's spokesman.

MISCHLER: Something press corps.

MARTIN: Yes.

SHORTZ: Yes. And where do they have their drillings?

MARTIN: 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

MISCHLER: Oh, OK. Thank you. Yes, I do know it. Oh, OK. White House press corps.

MARTIN: Nice.

SHORTZ: White House press corps is it. And your last one: a saying expressed when two people come up with the same idea.

MISCHLER: I don't know. (unintelligible) said you owe me a...

MARTIN: That's right.

SHORTZ: I like that but...

MARTIN: And it's five words.

SHORTZ: It's not five-by-five.

MARTIN: Oh, you're right.

SHORTZ: Two people say you come up with the same idea at the same time and what do you say?

MISCHLER: I don't know. With five letters? I don't know.

MARTIN: I don't know either, Will.

SHORTZ: I'll just tell you. It's great minds think alike.

MARTIN: Oh yes.

MISCHLER: Oh, OK, OK, OK. I never used it in that situation. I've used it in other.

MARTIN: Still pretty good effort, AElfwine. Congratulations. That was great.

MISCHLER: Thank you.

MARTIN: And for playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, as well as puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at NPR.org/slash puzzle.

And I know we don't have a local NPR member station in Cairo, but tell us, AElfwine, how do you tune in to our program?

MISCHLER: I listen to NPR.org.

MARTIN: Great, so you listen online to our website, NPR.org. AElfwine Mischler from Cairo, thanks so much for playing the puzzle this week.

MISCHLER: Thank you.

So, Will, what do you have for us next week?

SHORTZ: Yes, this week's challenge comes from listener Kevin Roberts of Norcross, Georgia. Name two fictional characters - the first one good, the second one bad. Each is a one-word name. Drop the last letter of the name of the first character. Read the remaining letters in order from left to right and the result will name a world capital. What is it?

So again, two fictional characters - the first one good, the second one bad - each is a one-word name. Drop the last letter of the name of the first character. Read the result from left to right and it will name a world capital. What capital is it?

MARTIN: When you have the answer, go to our website, NPR.org/puzzle and click on the Submit Your Answer link - just one entry per person, please. And our deadline for entries is Thursday, February 16th at 3 P.M. Eastern Time. Please include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. And if you're the winner we'll give you a call, and you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle-master, Will Shortz.

Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thanks, Rachel. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.