Vince Winkel

REPORTER, WHQR NEWS

Vince Winkel joined the WHQR news team in March, 2017. He had previously been covering business and economics for the Greater Wilmington Business Journal.

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Vince began his career in public broadcasting with Monitor Radio in 1985, during which time his work received reporting awards from the Overseas Press Club of America, International Radio Festival of New York (Gold Medal), Society of Professional Journalists Sigma Delta Chi, Gabriel Award: Best Feature-National Release, National Federation of Community Broadcasters, Colorado Press Association, Associated Press Television Association of California and others.

During his previous time in public radio he also was a contributor to Living on Earth, SoundPrint, Only a Game, Southern California Public Radio, Marketplace and the BBC.

Vince also helped launch Public Interactive, working with PBS and NPR stations across the country in developing content and publishing tools for station websites.

During an eight year break from radio, Vince was media director for BMW Motorcycles, managing their publications and digital media.

You’ll usually see Vince on a grey motorcycle with WHQR decals, all over Wilmington.

Vince Winkel / WHQR

Four of the top 25 cities in the country for opioid abuse are in North Carolina. Wilmington is number one, according to a report from Castlight Health, a San Francisco-based healthcare information company. 

Vince Winkel / WHQR

The new organization Clean Cape Fear held its second “Water Wednesday” event Wednesday evening  at the Coastline Convention Center. They met to discuss communicating the news of GenX and other compounds in the water supply, to the poor and otherwise underserved people of the region. About 145 people were in attendance.

Vince Winkel / WHQR

Chemours and GenX. A month ago, most people in the region probably had not heard either word. Since June 7, that’s changed. Water is being tested by the state, the EPA and the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority, as citizens are buying a lot more bottled water. 

Vince Winkel / WHQR

One of the questions emerging from the GenX story we are covering relates to cancer rates in the region. GenX is the chemical compound first reported to be in the Cape Fear River and drinking water supply three weeks ago by the Star News. On Thursday we got an answer about cancer rates from the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. 

Vince Winkel / WHQR

This week the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority began its own round of tests of water in the Cape Fear River. In light of what’s been happening with GenX, the utility authority is also working on improving its communication with the public. 

Vince Winkel / WHQR

On Monday the Chemours Company confirmed in an email to WHQR News that they have begun the capture of the wastewater stream, and GenX, generated from production at their manufacturing facility in Fayetteville. Meanwhile, water testing of the Cape Fear River continues. 

Vince Winkel / WHQR

More than 300 people turned out for a community forum on GenX and drinking water at the Coastline Convention Center on Wednesday. The meeting was organized by Cape Fear River Watch, and featured six panelists on the topic. 

Vince Winkel / WHQR

The Wilmington City Council approved the 2017-18 budget Tuesday. The $217 million fiscal year budget includes a small property tax decrease. Before tackling the budget, the council heard from several speakers on the topic of GenX, which is why close to 200 people crowded into council chambers. 

Vince Winkel

New Hanover County Commissioners adopted a resolution Monday calling on Chemours to stop production of GenX. Brunswick County Commissioners adopted a resolution the same day -- asking Chemours to stop the discharge of the GenX chemical into the Cape Fear River.  That’s largely because  there is still a lot about GenX that we don’t know. It’s all about chemistry. Which means for many of us, it can be somewhat difficult to grasp.

Vince Winkel / WHQR

New Hanover County Commissioners met Monday night to vote on the 2017 – 2018 county budget, which takes effect July 1. Not everyone in attendance was happy with the outcome.

Vince Winkel / WHQR

On Monday the state began taking water samples along the Cape Fear River, to determine the current levels of GenX in the water. The North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality will sample water from 12 locations. A lab in Colorado will then do the analysis. Once those levels are determined, scientists hope to determine what, if any, health effects GenX has had or could have on the citizens here.

Vince Winkel / WHQR

New water collection and testing of the Cape Fear River will begin next week. That was one of the results of yesterday’s meeting between Chemours, the company that produces known toxin GenX, and city, county, and state officials. A state investigation by NC DEQ and NC DHHS is now underway as well. 

Vince Winkel

Officials from Chemours, the company that produces GenX, were in Wilmington Thursday for a 90-minute meeting with city, county and state officials. One thing that was exposed was that since 1980, Chemours had a vinyl ether process operating at its Fayetteville Works site up the Cape Fear River from Wilmington. It is a process that produces GenX as a byproduct. After the closed door meeting, local officials met with the media, but Chemours did not.  

Vince Winkel

On Thursday representatives from Wilmington, the counties of Pender, Brunswick and New Hanover, the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority, and the state’s department of environmental quality and department of health and human services, will meet behind closed doors with the Chemours Company. That’s the company behind GenX, a chemical reported to be in the region’s water supply. 

Vince Winkel / WHQR

This morning, New Hanover County released a statement from the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, on the possible health effects related to GenX. It says that GenX levels detected in tests three years ago in the Cape Fear River, would be expected to pose a low risk to human health. It added that there are no U.S. regulatory guideline levels for GenX. Also on Tuesday, Gov. Roy Cooper addressed the issue.

Vince Winkel / WHQR

On Monday evening (June 12), the NC Department of Health and Human Services (NC DHHS) released a health effects statement on GenX to county public health directors. The statement was prepared for the NC Division of Environmental Quality (NCDEQ) by the Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch of NC DHHS.

Vince Winkel / WHQR

The chemical compound GenX and the region’s water supply remain on the minds of many. Late Monday New Hanover County officials confirmed a meeting this week to learn more about GenX, and what needs to be done. 

Vince Winkel / WHQR

We continue our coverage on GenX, a chemical compound discovered in the region’s water supply. The story was first reported by the StarNews. Today we explore what state and federal agencies are doing about this potential health hazard.

Vince Winkel / WHQR

GenX. No, we don’t mean Generation X. GenX is a chemical compound we first reported on yesterday. That’s when the StarNews reported on this toxic contaminant that has been found in the Cape Fear River. It’s a key ingredient in Teflon, linked to cancer. It gets into the river at a plant 100 miles upstream. 

Vince Winkel / WHQR

The StarNews has broken a story about a potentially-cancer-causing chemical in southeastern North Carolina’s drinking water supply. According to a piece published by Vaughan Hagerty at starnewsonline.com, a chemical replacement for a key ingredient in Teflon linked to cancer and a host of other ailments has been found in the drinking water system of the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority. 

Vince Winkel / WHQR

There was one basic theme at the state’s GOP Convention over the weekend, one point not to be denied.  There was one name not to be taken in vain at the GOP convention. That name was Trump.

NC GOP

The state’s Republican Party wrapped up their annual convention Sunday in Wilmington. They re-elected their party chairman, and reaffirmed their platform.  

Robin Hayes will serve another two-year term as the party’s chairman. The former Congressman was re-elected Saturday afternoon.

Vince Winkel / WHQR

More than 1,000 Republican delegates attended the GOP Convention this weekend in Wilmington. Also, around 40 protestors gathered to express their view. 

Vince Winkel

The North Carolina State Republican Convention got underway today at the Wilmington Convention Center. 

Wilmington, for a few days, is the center of the Republican Party universe. On Friday more than 1,300 party members will roll into town for the state’s GOP Convention.  The party has brought in some big names to rally the troops.

Vince Winkel / WHQR

Every year, the Historic Wilmington Foundation releases a list of the region’s threatened historic sites. It’s their way of bringing attention to old homes and buildings that need protection to be saved and preserved.  “So the 2017 most threatened historic places for the Historic Wilmington Foundation is as follows ….” 

Vince Winkel / WHQR

New Hanover County’s new fiscal year begins July 1. That means county commissioners will vote June 19 on the new proposed budget. That budget was supposed to be on the agenda at a June 5 public hearing, however the commissioners canceled that session. 

Vince Winkel / WHQR

The politics of budgeting for city and county government in the Cape Fear region may have some clashing priorities. 

Good Shepherd

When New Hanover County Commissioners meet on June 19 to vote on a new county budget, they will be doing so without holding the customary public hearing two weeks in advance. The scheduled June 5 public hearing was cancelled. 

NPR

NPR listeners know the name Melissa Block. She’s been with the network for 32 years. This week the public radio veteran visited WHQR.  Block’s current work on NPR is Our Land, a special series that looks to capture how people's identity is shaped by where they live.

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