Scott Horsley

Scott Horsley is a White House correspondent for NPR News. He reports on the policy and politics of the Obama Administration, with a special emphasis on economic issues.

The 2012 campaign is the third presidential contest Horsley has covered for NPR. He previously reported on Senator John McCain's White House bid in 2008 and Senator John Kerry's campaign in 2004. Thanks to this experience, Horsley has become an expert in the motel shampoo offerings of various battleground states.

Horsley took up the White House beat after serving as a San Diego-based business correspondent for NPR where he covered fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley was a reporter for member station KPBS-FM, where he received numerous honors, including a Public Radio News Directors' award for coverage of the California energy crisis.

Earlier in his career, Horsley worked as a reporter for WUSF-FM in Tampa, Florida, and as a news writer and reporter for commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University.

Democratic vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine spoke to a church group in Miami over the weekend.

That wouldn't be remarkable except that he spoke entirely in Spanish — a first for a candidate on a major-party ticket.

"Yo soy cristiano, un católico" ("I'm a Christian, a Catholic") Kaine told parishioners at Pneuma Church at the beginning of his five-minute speech.

Kaine described his background working as a missionary in Honduras, where he said he learned lessons about faith, family and hard work.

First lady Michelle Obama joined students from across the country Thursday in picking produce from the White House garden. It's the last such harvest of the Obama era. But the first lady has taken steps to ensure the garden — and the bumper crop of publicity and goodwill it generated — won't disappear once she and her husband leave the White House.

Social Security alone consumes nearly a quarter of the federal budget.

At this week's vice presidential debate, Democrat Tim Kaine and Republican Mike Pence spoke about how the administrations they hope to join would deal with the challenges facing safety net programs like it.

Social Security

The Challenge

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Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump renewed his attacks on a former Miss Universe winner Friday, heedless of the possible fallout with women and Latino voters.

In a series of tweets posted around 5 a.m. ET, Trump criticized Alicia Machado as "my worst Miss U." and described her as "disgusting."

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The Arizona Republic has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president — the first time the newspaper has backed a Democrat in its history.

The Republic's editorial board writes that Clinton understands what the position demands: "a steady hand, a cool head, and the ability to think carefully before acting." And it pointedly concludes that her Republican rival, Donald Trump, does not.

Jordan Weaver was just a kid when Barack Obama was elected eight years ago. But she'll never forget that November night.

"My biggest memory is us in my living room," said Weaver, who grew up in Harrisburg, Penn. "My mom was crying. She was so happy that a president could be African-American and people accepted him. You could just see that everyone was so excited."

Eight years later, Weaver joined thousands of people who turned out to see Obama speak in Philadelphia earlier this week.

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Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump offered a bold prediction Thursday that his economic plan will deliver up to 25 million new jobs over the next decade. He described the blueprint as "the most pro-growth, pro-jobs, pro-family plan put forth perhaps in the history of our country."

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