Rachel Lewis Hilburn

News Director, Host of CoastLine

Rachel Lewis Hilburn came to WHQR in the spring of 2011.  After serving as back-up host for Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Classical Music for a year, she was named News Director in July of 2012. 

She moved to Wilmington in 2003 from Los Angeles, where she worked as a financial advisor for Morgan Stanley.  After joining the local ABC affiliate in Wilmington, she wrote and produced local TV newscasts, a 30-minute special program for the Cape Fear Museum showcasing its renovation and new exhibits, and independently wrote and produced a documentary on the lingering effects of the 1898 coup d'etat in Wilmington.   Before joining the staff, Rachel partnered with New York co-producer Linda Bianchi and produced Stories, Wine, and Cheese - a series of local, live storytelling events which aired on WHQR.  

Ways To Connect

This broadcast of CoastLine originally aired on September 10, 2014.

How will a $160 million general obligation bond issue impact the New Hanover County Public School System, and what impact would its passage have on property owners?    

This broadcast of CoastLine originally aired on September 3, 2014.

The shooting of an unarmed black teenager by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri sparked questions nationwide over the use of excessive force.

But concerns have been brewing in the Cape Fear region over tensions between police and community residents for months. 

This broadcast of CoastLine originally aired on August 27, 2014. 

How does art for art’s sake impact a child’s developmentand is there a way to incorporate the arts as a vehicle for teaching other disciplines?  

This broadcast of CoastLine originally aired on August 20, 2014. 

Ending Chronic Homelessness in ten years:  it’s a commitment that the City of Wilmington, three local county governments, service providers, and the United Way made six years ago.  Slightly past the halfway point, the number of chronically homeless people in the region is down by more than half. 

Audacious is the word Katrina Knight uses to describe her first reaction to the notion that ending chronic homelessness was possible. 

This broadcast of CoastLine originally aired on August 13, 2014. 

What’s the best way to grow while staying true to the Port City’s historic legacyand what are the challenges to growth downtown we still face? 

This broadcast of CoastLine originally aired on August 6, 2014.

What does sea level rise, now widely-accepted by the scientific community, mean for coastal areas in North Carolina?  How concerned do we really need to be?   

This broadcast of CoastLine originally aired on July 30, 2014.

Arts and the local economy:  will a new performing arts venue, the largest in the region, edge out smaller theater companies in the competition for ticket buyers? 

This broadcast of CoastLine originally aired on July 16, 2014.  

Charter Schools in North Carolina:  What role should they play within the public school system and how is that role changing?  

During a time when every dollar spent on public education is scrutinized, lawmakers, parents, and advocacy groups alike are asking:  are charter schools effectively expanding options in the public school system?  Are they bridging an achievement gap?  Or are they siphoning taxpayer resources from traditional public schools? 

This broadcast of CoastLine originally aired on July 9, 2014.   

Gang violence in our region: After all the community conversations, what have we learned? Are there new, best practices that we're implementing? What's already working that we might expand? How can we improve and refine our approach? 

This broadcast of CoastLine originally aired on July 2, 2014.  

Coal ash in North Carolina— What is it?  Why and how should we regulate it?  And how soon will we will see coal ash cleaned up? 

Coal ash grabbed the national spotlight back in February when a wastewater pipe burst at Duke Energy’s Eden Plant, spilling an estimated 39,000 tons into the Dan River.  What many news media outlets are commonly calling toxic sludge coated about 70 miles of that waterway, which winds along the North Carolina–Virginia border. 

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