Rachel Lewis Hilburn

News Director, All Things Considered Host, CoastLine Host & Producer

Rachel Lewis Hilburn came to WHQR in the spring of 2011.  After serving as back-up host for Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Classical Music for a year, she was named News Director in July of 2012. 

She moved to Wilmington from Los Angeles, where she worked as a financial advisor for Morgan Stanley.  After joining the local ABC affiliate in Wilmington, she wrote and produced local TV newscasts, a 30-minute special program for the Cape Fear Museum showcasing its renovation and new exhibits, and independently wrote and produced a documentary on the lingering effects of the 1898 coup d'etat in Wilmington.   Before joining the staff, Rachel co-produced Stories, Wine, and Cheese - a series of local, live storytelling events which aired on WHQR.  

Ways to Connect

In the nonpartisan race for Wilmington’s City Council, there are nine people competing for three open seats that carry four-year terms.  Two incumbents are hoping for reelection; they are with us today.  And one seat is wide open since Earl Sheridan decided not to run again. 

Despite the fact that presidential election years turn out the highest numbers of voters, municipal elections have the most direct impact on quality of life.  This fact is pretty widely accepted.  But even the most educated and engaged among us – most notably a political scientist at an esteemed local university – even they are unlikely to know the people who are running for Wilmington’s City Council.

City of Wilmington

Wilmington is home to more than 117-thousand people.   That’s growth of about 11,000 people since the last census in 2010.  73% of the population identifies as white, less than 20% is African-American, and 6% is Latino or Hispanic.

The City of Wilmington is home to more than 117-thousand people.   That’s growth of about 11,000 people since the last census in 2010.  73% of the population identifies as white, less than 20% is African-American, and 6% is Latino or Hispanic.

On this edition of the CoastLine Candidate Interviews, we spend the first segment with one candidate for the Wrightsville Beach Board of Aldermen.  The remaining two segments feature candidates running for Brunswick Regional Water and Sewer H2GO, popularly known as H2GO – who have opposing views on whether to build a reverse osmosis plant. 

Segment 1:  Pat Prince for Wrightsville Beach Board of Aldermen

Brunswick Regional Water and Sewer H2GO, popularly known as H2GO, is a water and sewer utility in Brunswick County that serves the northeast portion of the County including Leland, Belville, parts of Navassa, and some customers located outside of these municipal boundaries.  H2GO serves over 10,000 water customers and nearly 6,000 sewer customers.

NASA / Flickr

As Hurricane Irma approaches, some events scheduled for next week may be affected. Here are the events we know of so far:

  • United Way of the Cape Fear Kickoff – scheduled for Tuesday, September 12th, CANCELLED.
  • Phoenix Hometown Hires' JobWeek - scheduled for Monday, September 11th - POSTPONED until Monday, September 18th.
  • The DREAMS Dinner that was scheduled for Monday evening (Sep. 11) at Osteria Cicchetti was rescheduled for a later date. Stay tuned for updates on the new date and time.

Judy Girard

This episode first aired on April 21, 2016. 

August 25, 2017 update:  Judy Girard serves as Vice Chair of the GLOW Academy School Board which is now open.

Judy Girard started her television career in the late 1960s and worked her way through the halls of NBC in New York – where she developed shows such as Maury Povich, Jenny Jones, and Jerry Springer.  Her decision to move the Phil Donahue show to New York helped solidify it as the pre-eminent talk show in the country. 

U.S. Department of Justice

This episode first aired on May 26, 2016.

August 25, 2017 update:  Lindsey Roberson now serves as a Trial Attorney in the Human Trafficking Prosecution Unit, Civil Rights Division, at the U.S. Department of Justice. 

Read the Transcript Here. Read the Emails Here.

Within the City of Wilmington, statues and street names honoring key members of the Confederacy pepper the landscape.  At the entrance to downtown Wilmington, on one corner stands a statue of George Davis, Confederate Attorney General.  At a nearby intersection, a monument honoring soldiers of the Confederacy stands. 

Bonnie Monteleone

When you use a disposable diaper, some scientists would tell you the plastic in that diaper actually stays in the environment for hundreds of years.  The plastic bag you brought home from the grocery store?  Estimates vary, but some put the number of years it takes to decompose as high as one thousand.  Whether those numbers are accurate or more research needs to be done doesn’t change what we know about how plastics are showing up in oceans all over the world – and not only harming marine life – but becoming part of the human food chain. 

Pixabay

13 Reasons Why – first a book, then a Netflix series, tells the story of Hannah Baker, a high school student who dies by suicide.  But before she carries it out, she creates old-school cassette tapes – each one telling the story of a particular person who hurt her which add up to the 13 reasons why she decided to die.  They’re various injuries, small and large, including her rape by a classmate.   

Skeeze / Pixabay

With the region’s latest heat wave and the tropical soup that’s spawned Hurricane Gert and three other potential systems in the North Atlantic, it’s hard to think about getting outside and planting anything that isn’t zoned for a humid, subtropical climate. 

But fall will be here before you know it, and in southeastern North Carolina and northeastern South Carolina, fall is a great time to plant.  We find out why on this edition of CoastLine from our experts, and we hear about the latest garden trends, but most importantly, we get your gardening questions answered.

Hannes Grobe / Wikimedia Commons

Jump to Transcript. Jump to Related Links.

President Donald Trump signed an executive order in late April to expand energy exploration drilling in the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans.  The order puts in place a new five-year program, 2019-2024, that will supersede the earlier one – essentially reversing the Obama Administration’s decision to remove the mid-Atlantic region from consideration for offshore drilling. 

There are crooks, criminals, and hucksters out there trying to get your money through investment scams, retail fraud, identity theft, and they’ve been there since commerce began.  But are there degrees of hucksterism?  What’s the line between an enthusiastic entrepreneur with a brilliant, albeit untested idea versus a good, old-fashioned snake oil salesman who doesn’t really care if what’s in the bottle he’s selling doesn’t work?  His goal:  to make the sale and move on. 

This is a small sample of interviews with candidates in the 2016 election seeking federal, state, and local office. 

CoastLine Candidate Interviews during the 2016 election season included:

North Carolina's 7th Congressional District (David Rouzer vs. Wesley Casteen)

North Carolina House District 17 (Frank Iler, R-Brunswick County)

North Carolina House District 19 (Ted Davis, R-New Hanover County)

North Carolina House District 20 (Holly Grange, R-New Hanover County)

Ladynylon / Wikimedia Commons

  This interview was part of the June 28, 2017 edition of CoastLine.

HB2, the North Carolina legislation that mandated bathroom use according to the gender on one's birth certificate, helped to stoke a mainstream national conversation about people who are transgender.

Oxford University Press

If you’ve ever marveled at the artistry of Citizen Kane or sneered at the 1990s cult film Starship Troopers  or decided that Raging Bull is the greatest film of all time, then today’s discussion is for you.  We explore why films give us pleasure.

Dram Tree Shakespeare

There’s an old saying about Shakespeare plays:  they’re a lot more fun to act in than they are to watch. 

However, there are efforts in town that are shaking apart that old idea and building a whole new paying audience for Shakespeare.  We’re seeing this most notably with Dram Tree Shakespeare and Alchemical Theatre, whose productions are associated with the Theater Department at the University of North Carolina Wilmington.

Guests: 

On July 2, 1961, Ernest Hemingway rose quietly, so as not to disturb his wife.  He put on his bathrobe and slippers, walked down to the basement of his Idaho home, and unlocked his gun case.  He climbed the steps to his foyer, placed his favorite shotgun to the roof of his mouth, and blew the top of his head off.

Courtesy Martha Peterson

It was 1975 when Martha Peterson’s plane landed in Moscow and launched her assignment as an American case officer for the CIA inside Russia. 

Klaus Toxic via Wikimedia Commons

Five women hanged during the Salem witch trials in Massachusetts were memorialized Wednesday, July 19th on the 325th anniversary of their deaths.  Sarah Good, Elizabeth Howe, Susannah Martin, Sarah Wildes, and Rebecca Nurse might sound like familiar names -- either from history class or the Arthur Miller play, The Crucible, which was based on the Salem Witch Trials.  Twenty people were killed during that 17th century witch hunt. 

White House Photograph Courtesy Gerald R. Ford Library.

North Carolina state legislators have passed House Bill 527 – also known as an Act to Restore and Preserve Free Speech on the Campuses of the Constituent Institutions of the University of North Carolina -- almost exactly along partisan lines.  Sponsored by North Carolina State Representative Chris Millis, a Republican from Pender County, the bill now sits on Governor Roy Cooper’s desk.

WHQR, StarNews, and WWAY sponsored a public forum at Odell Williamson Auditorium to explore persistent questions about the fluorochemical load in the Cape Fear River -- which is much of southeastern North Carolina's drinnking water supply.

WHQR invites you to a public forum on the GenX water issue Wednesday night, July 19th from 7 - 9 PM at Odell Williamson Auditorium.  The StarNews, WWAY, and HQR News will pose your questions to a panel of experts. You can also listen live, on 91.3 FM, WHQR. 

Cleve Callison is probably a name you associate with WHQR fundraising -- whether it’s the signature at the bottom of a donation request letter or the voice singing Super Chicken when an hourly goal is reached during an on-air pledge drive.  When you hear the name Cleve Callison you might think about HQR’s weekly segment featuring your calls and emails – Friday Feedback.

Gerry Dincher / Flickr

New Hanover County shows significant demographic and achievement disparities across its 42 schools.  That’s according to analysis from the Inclusion Project – a report out of the University of North Carolina’s Center for Civil Rights in Chapel Hill.   Between 2006 and 2010, New Hanover County’s School Board adopted a neighborhood school model that, according to that report, has exacerbated the disparities.

Jason W. Smith via Wikimedia Commons

Short term rentals:  they’re those properties that are rented out by an owner to vacationers or tourists -- often for a week, a few weeks, or a few days.  Vacation Rental By Owner ( VRBO) and Airbnb are two of the most popular websites for these types of rentals. 

Vince Winkel / WHQR

GenX is an emerging contaminant – a chemical compound that is both product and byproduct in this story. 

Ladynylon / Wikimedia Commons

HB2, the North Carolina legislation that mandated bathroom use according to the gender on one’s birth certificate, helped to stoke a mainstream national conversation about people who are transgender.  

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