Rachel Lewis Hilburn

News Director, All Things Considered Host, CoastLine Host / Producer

Rachel Lewis Hilburn came to WHQR in the spring of 2011.  After serving as back-up host for Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Classical Music for a year, she was named News Director in July of 2012. 

She moved to Wilmington from Los Angeles, where she worked as a financial advisor for Morgan Stanley.  After joining the local ABC affiliate in Wilmington, she wrote and produced local TV newscasts, a 30-minute special program for the Cape Fear Museum showcasing its renovation and new exhibits, and independently wrote and produced a documentary on the lingering effects of the 1898 coup d'etat in Wilmington.   Before joining the staff, Rachel co-produced Stories, Wine, and Cheese - a series of local, live storytelling events which aired on WHQR.  

Ways to Connect

Have you seen headlines in your Facebook feed or at the bottom of an article that reads, “Hillary Clinton meets Osama Bin Laden” – with a picture of the two shaking hands?  Or “President Obama’s daughter, Malia, is pregnant”?  Or “The process to impeach Donald Trump has begun”?  Just to be clear, all of those stories are false.  Hillary Clinton’s picture was photoshopped; Malia’s teen pregnancy and Donald Trump’s impeachment are both patently false.  It’s fake news. 

Wikimedia Commons

New Jersey recently passed one of the nation’s most comprehensive laws to combat the growing opioid and heroin crisis.  Tennessee is battling its own opioid epidemic as is Nebraska, Virginia, Connecticut, Washington State, New York, Wisconsin, Montana – the list goes on.  And as we’ve reported on this program before – Wilmington, North Carolina and the larger Cape Fear region is near the top of a national list for its abuse of opioids and heroin. 

President Donald Trump declared at a recent National Prayer Breakfast that he would totally destroy the Johnson Amendment in order to allow representatives of faith to speak freely and without fear of retribution.  Until that declaration, Americans might not have thought much about the Johnson Amendment and what it means.  On this edition of CoastLine, we explore the potential implications with two local clergy members. 

But before we meet our guests, a quick explanation:

photo - left: Trikosko, Marion S., photo - right: Fibonacci Blue / Wikimedia Commons

It’s almost impossible to turn on the TV or radio, read the paper, or look at your news feed on your smart phone and not see a story about the recent Executive Order on Immigration. 

Signed by President Donald Trump last month, it temporarily halts the admittance of refugees into the U.S. and prevents immigrants from seven predominantly-Muslim countries from coming to the U.S.  However, enforcement of the Order is on hold. 

https://www.cisbrunswick.org/
Communities In Schools, Brunswick County

In the Brunswick County School System, there are 19 schools.  Two academic years ago, in 2014-15, 158 kids dropped out of school.  The following year, 21 fewer kids – 137 -- dropped out.  That lowers the dropout rate less than a half a percentage point, but on a practical level, it means there are twenty-one more students that have a shot at getting their high school diploma. 

By Psychonaught (Own work) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons

Wilmington, North Carolina is at the top of an unfortunate list.  One study published last year, based on analysis of numbers from the Centers for Disease Control, shows more than 11.5% of the population abuses opioids.  Opioid abusers tend to live in the rural south – according to the Castlight report

Marine Biology at the University of North Carolina – Wilmington is frequently held up as one of the highly-regarded programs there.  Life and Marine Sciences were identified by a New Hanover County economic development analysis two and a half years ago as one of the existing strengths for the Cape Fear region and one that should be exploited.

UNCW

As North Carolina legislators begin a new long session in Raleigh, both political parties have pointed to education as an area needing attention.  The first day of the session, Republican lawmakers filed a bill in the House to address class sizes.  That’s because last year, a newly-passed law reduced maximum class size – but came with no additional state funding.  That left some school systems looking down the barrel of cutting in other areas – such as arts and physical education.  That will be addressed this session.  And Democratic Governor Roy Cooper has listed education – particularly

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When you think of an accessible space, you might picture a ramp to the side door of a building, big metal grab bars next to a toilet, or a button with a wheelchair insignia that automatically opens doors.  But a concept called Universal Design is gaining traction.

Google Earth

Every successful municipality will inevitably grapple with the push-pull of growth versus green space –  how to grow a tax base without over-developing a city.  Echo Farms, a development within the City of Wilmington, is at the center of this battle in the Cape Fear region. 

Encore

The man we meet on this edition of CoastLine is a bona fide Air Pirate -- convicted in absentia by the Nigerian government just after the civil war.  He was the first broadcast engineer on staff at WHQR.  He’s written a book of fiction called The Ship’s Cat.  And he acted in the notoriously – um – horrific film Death Bed:  The Bed that Eats.  He also helped to design the bed that eats. 

Guest:

From Cheese on Bread

Jeremy Vest has interviewed Karl Rove, Ben Affleck, John Stamos, and Al Franken – among others -- for an MTV show called How's Your News?.   He has been coached by Geraldo Rivera.  And he’s appeared as the lead character in a Western called Bulletproof Jackson – which became the subject of a separate documentary – Becoming Bulletproof.  That documentary was written about by the New York Times and distributed by Morgan Spurlock Productions. 

North Carolina ranks 9th in the nation for most racial progress:  that’s according to a new analysis published by WalletHub, a personal finance website that frequently publishes analyses based on demographic statistics.

University of South Carolina Press, 2016


UNCW Associate Professor Julie-Ann Scott-Pollock examines emodiment questions and stigma surrounding disabilities.
Marion Post Wolcott / Library of Congress

When you think about disability and how you define it, what comes to mind?  A child who doesn’t learn through conventional methods?  An older person who struggles to get groceries from the car to the front door?  Do you imagine a person in a wheelchair? 

One disability researcher says our binary view of ability or lack of it is misguided; ability spans a spectrum from Olympic-level athleticism to death – and we’re all somewhere on that spectrum.  On this edition of CoastLine, we explore how we look at disability and what impact those views have on all of us. 

Magnus Manske / Wikimedia Commons

This edition of CoastLine is about food.  But it's not about the world food supply, ethical or nutritional food choices, or even food deserts.  Nope.  In honor of the holiday season, including but not limited to the Winter Solstice, Christmas, Chanukah, Kwanza, Pancha Ganapati, Human Light Day, and Newtonmas, we are celebrating food .  And to help us do that, we have two of the most celebrated chefs in Wilmington.

Guests:

Robert Parr

North Carolina has a controversial history when it comes to its willingness to accept and plan for sea level rise.  In 2012, the state legislature enacted a multi-year moratorium on considering data from a science panel for future planning and policymaking.  That moratorium has since lifted and a new study out last year, looking at the next 30 years, is now accepted as a reasonable basis for policymaking.

National Park Service -- https://www.nps.gov/guge/learn/management/index.htm

The Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor stretches from its northernmost point near Wilmington, North Carolina all the way south to Jacksonville, Florida.  Created by an Act of Congress in 2006, the ten-year-old Corridor is a work in progress.  

Gullah Geechee culture originates from West Africans brought to the United States as slaves and many of their traditions, including the language, continue through later generations. 

paws4people

Dogs and people — it's a profoundly deep connection that has evolved over millennia, and it's one that scientists are still studying. According to a report in National Geographic, researchers have found that dogs can read facial expressions, communicate jealousy, display empathy, and watch TV. Experts estimate these traits have evolved over the course of 11,000 to 16,000 years. 

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A little more than a century ago, Jewish people around the world faced decisions that have proved critical in shaping the past century.  On this edition of CoastLine, we look at those decisions through the eyes of two historians who are launching a lecture series in January at the Temple of Israel’s Reibman Center in Wilmington.

Guests:

Carole Fink, Humanities Distinguished Professor of History Emerita, The Ohio State University;
Professor of History Emerita, University of North Carolina Wilmington

By Steven Nass - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=38869847

A federal court ruled earlier this year that two of North Carolina’s congressional districts, drawn in 2011, were unconstitutional because they were racially gerrymandered.  That case is to be argued before the U.S.

OpenSource.com on Flickr Creative Commons - https://www.flickr.com/photos/opensourceway/4427310974/

Economic development is the way municipalities, counties, states, and nations improve the quality of life for its citizens.  Economic growth is one element and can be a metric for measuring that.  In pursuit that growth, communities often lay out a blueprint – a vision – that details how they would like to see that growth unfold. 

"Crazy Thanksgiving" by Louish Pixel on Flickr Creative Commons -- https://www.flickr.com/photos/louish/

Did you vote for Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, Gary Johnson, or Jill Stein?

Are you pro-life or pro-choice?

How do you feel about immigration? Do you refer to people living in the United States illegally as illegal aliens or people who are undocumented?  

Throughout election season, Donald Trump referred to the media as "dishonest and crooked." But that assessment is not limited to the President-elect. 

North Carolina’s House District 18 – which includes New Hanover and Brunswick Counties – is one of the few regional races with a Democratic winner.  Incumbent Susi Hamilton will serve her district for a fourth term.

New Hanover County’s Board of Commissioners race was one of the more fiercely fought local races.  At the end of the night on Tuesday, it appeared as though the two incumbents, Republican Woody White and Democrat Jonathan Barfield, will keep their seats.

Patricia Kusek, who has served on the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority Board, is the newcomer and the second-highest vote-getter.  White took the most votes, garnering more than 18%, with Kusek coming in at nearly 17% and Jonathan Barfield coming in just behind Kusek – by a margin of about 14 votes. 

Brunswick County Boards Remain Republican

Nov 9, 2016

Board of Commissioners

Brunswick County’s Board of Commissioners had three out of five seats in play.  The county is made up of five districts, and all county residents vote for all districts. 

Brunswick County is majority Republican.  With unaffiliated voters making up the second largest voting bloc, any Democratic candidate has a steep mountain to climb.  And last night’s vote kept Brunswick County Commissioners reliably – and 100% Republican. 

RLH

Some have aptly described this Election Day – the voting part – not the counting ballots part – as the eye of the storm.  Around lunch time, anecdotal reports described trickles of voters around the region – after a relatively busy morning. 

Brenda and Bobby Hunt showed up at the polls just after 1 o’clock -- what they hoped would be a slow time to vote in Brunswick County – and they were right.  But line or no line, military veteran Bobby Hunt says exercising the right to vote is something he would not miss. 

The Brunswick County Board of Commissioners has three of its five districts in play this year; however all county residents vote for all the districts.   Three Democrats are hoping to win seats on what is currently an all-Republican Board in a very red county.

On this edition of the CoastLine Candidate Interviews, we hear from the three Democrats seeking seats on Brunswick County’s Board of Commissioners.

There are five members on the Board – one representing each district in Brunswick County.  The four-year terms are staggered, and elections are held every two years.  This year, Districts 3, 4, and 5 are in play. 

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