Korva Coleman

Korva Coleman is a newscaster for NPR.

In this role, she is responsible for writing, producing, and delivering national newscasts airing during NPR's newsmagazines All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Weekend Edition. Occasionally she serves as a substitute host for Weekend All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

Before joining NPR in 1990, Coleman was a staff reporter and copy editor for the Washington Afro-American newspaper. She produced and hosted First Edition, an overnight news program at NPR's member station WAMU-FM in Washington, D.C.

Early in her career, Coleman worked in commercial radio as news and public affairs directors at stations in Phoenix and Tucson.

Coleman's work has been recognized by the Arizona Associated Press Awards for best radio newscast, editorial, and short feature. In 1983, she was nominated for Outstanding Young Woman of America.

Coleman earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Howard University. She studied law at Georgetown University Law Center.

This one probably isn't over yet. A local Georgia chapter of the Ku Klux Klan applied for permission to conduct regular trash clean ups along a state road, as part of the Adopt-A-Highway program. In exchange, Georgia usually posts a couple of small road signs honoring volunteers. This group's sign would read: IKK Realm of GA, Ku Klux Klan.

It would get your attention.

Under rain clouds, thousands of people turned out in Moscow to protest newly (re) elected President Vladmir Putin and his new efforts to quash dissent.

Before the huge rally even got off the ground, Russian authorities searched the apartments of opposition leaders and demanded they show up for questioning today, one hour before the demonstration was supposed to start, notes VOA.

Fighting has escalated in western Myanmar, formerly known as Burma, between stateless Rohingya Muslims and ethnic Rakhine Buddhists, who are the country's predominant religious group. President Thein Sein has declared a state of emergency and sent in army troops.

Good morning, here are some of the top stories we're following:

Syrian Children Are Being Killed, Tortured And Used As Shields, U.N. Says.

Special And Primary Elections Today in Six States. (ABC)

The accused killer of Florida teenager Trayvon Martin goes back to court June 29. That's when a judge will review whether to increase the bail amount for George Zimmerman. He returned to prison over the weekend after his bond was revoked last week. The judge determined Zimmerman and his wife hadn't told the full truth about how much money they had, and were able to pay a lower bail.

Vocalist Eduard Khil, a beloved Russian musician who found worldwide fame through an unlikely internet musical clip, died this week after suffering a stroke. He was 77.

Barely a day after she competed in the Miss USA beauty contest, Miss Pennsylvania Sheena Monnin tore off her sash and fired a scorching resignation:

"In good conscience I can no longer be affiliated in any way with an organization I consider to be fraudulent, lacking in morals, inconsistent, and in many ways trashy."

Trashy? There's a surprising perjorative from a woman who says on Facebook she's spent a decade associated with the pageant.

Here's a nightmare come true: a group of Indian villagers were gathered for a festival last month when they were attacked by a swarm of large, biting spiders. They're hairy, have fangs, and apparently latch on when they sink their teeth into their prey.

Calling Peter Parker.

Good morning: if it's Tuesday, somebody somewhere is voting. Here are some stories we're following:

Decision Day Arrives In Wisconsin.

Six States Hold Primary Elections For House Races. (Politico)

Reports: Drone Strike Targeted Al-Qaida's 'Leading Propagandist'.

Good morning! We're looking at these stories today:

For The Record, Basically, It's Romney.

Liberia's Charles Taylor Sentenced To 50 Years.

Britain's Highest Court Approves Extradition Of Wikileaks Founder Julian Assange To Sweden. (AP)

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano pledged on Wednesday the investigation into Secret Service agents who allegedly hired prostitutes this month in Cartagena, Colombia, "will be complete and thorough and we will leave no stone unturned."

Here's one way to spend time under house arrest: The WikiLeaks creator will run for the Senate in Australia, his home country. The revelation appeared, typically, on WikiLeaks' Twitter feed:

Assange is under house arrest in England, fighting extradition to Sweden, where he's accused of two sex crimes.

Daylight saving time goes into effect at 2 a.m. tomorrow. Remember the adage, "Spring forward, fall back," and set your clock ahead by one hour before you go to bed tonight.

Illinois Sen. Mark Kirk is hospitalized in Chicago after undergoing surgery to relieve swelling on his brain; doctors discovered he'd suffered a stroke over the weekend.

Days after angry Iranian students overran the British embassy in Tehran, The U.S. has opened its new "embassy" for Iranian citizens. Senior U.S. diplomats haven't returned to Tehran after more than 30 years - this department is web only.

The front page features a welcome video from Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, and the seal of the State Department, with the banner "Virtual Embassy of the United States, Tehran - Iran" set at the very top.

But as the welcome message reads,

An Arizona museum is giving that state's official neck wear a display all of its own for the next several months. The Heard Museum has opened its newest exhibit: Native American Bolo Ties: Vintage and Contemporary. It will run through next September.

Chances are that at some point you've donned a small pink ribbon supporting awareness of breast health and efforts to fight breast cancer. Chances are you might not recognize one of the women who brought it to universal prominence. Evelyn Lauder died on Saturday. She was a vice president of the cosmetics corporation founded by Estee' Lauder, her powerful mother-in-law. The Estee Lauder Companies says Evelyn Lauder, who was 75, died at home in New York of non-genetic ovarian cancer.

The Energy Department has quietly dismantled the last of its enormous B-53 nuclear bombs. Workers at a nuclear management plant just north of Amarillo, Texas, separated some 300 pounds of high explosive from the uranium that surrounds it inside the bomb.

Dakota Meyer, the Marine sergeant who received the Medal of Honor this month from President Obama at the White House, has turned down an opportunity to apply to be a New York City firefighter. The city's application deadline expired on Sept. 19 and Meyer — who was honored at the White House on Sept. 15 — missed the deadline. His attorney asked whether New York could briefly re-open the application process and a federal judge agreed — but only if Meyer was the sole applicant.

That's why Meyer said no thanks.

Wangari Maathai, the first African woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize, has died of cancer in a Nairobi hospital. She was 71. Maathai, of Kenya, became a Nobel laureate in 2004 for her work promoting environmental stewardship, empowering women and peaceful resistance to violence.

NASA has updated its news on the pending descent of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, and here's the headline: the satellite's re-entry has been pushed back. The UARS is now expected to plunge towards Earth late today or early Saturday, EDT.

The main drag on the satellite's speed - solar activity - is no longer the main reason why the spacecraft is slowing down. Its path, speed and spin are now so unpredictable that scientists say they cannot estimate when it will fall.

We know a little bit more about the fate of that falling weather satellite, the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, which is close to its fiery end. NASA now predicts the UARS will plunge into Earth's lower atmosphere "sometime during the afternoon of Sept. 23, Eastern Daylight Time".

It looks like a giant piece of biscotti covered with gold foil and pipe cleaners. But it's really a decommissioned weather satellite the size of a bus that NASA says will probably fall to Earth by Friday, oh, give or take a day.

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