Julie Rose

Around the Nation
5:43 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

N.C. Tries To Make Amends For Forced Sterilizations

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

In the early 1900s, more than half of the states in the U.S. passed laws allowing people to be sterilized against their will. North Carolina's eugenics program was particularly aggressive. Some 7,600 men, women and children were sterilized often because they were poor or mentally ill.

Now, North Carolina has done more than any other state to make amends, as we hear from Julie Rose of member station WFAE.

Read more
Politics
5:00 pm
Mon April 29, 2013

Transportation Nominee A Loyal Foot Soldier For Obama

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 5:48 pm

Charlotte Mayor Anthony Foxx has been nominated to head the U.S. Department of Transportation in President Obama's final term. What the soon-to-be 42-year old mayor lacks in transportation credentials, he makes up for in loyalty to the President and a shared vision of the need for better transit systems.

Around the Nation
4:09 pm
Tue February 19, 2013

Cold War Bunker Network Repurposed For 21st Century Threats

WBT radio's bomb shelter in Charlotte, N.C., part of a government-funded emergency communications network, as it looked in 1963.
Courtesy of Jerry Dowd

Originally published on Tue February 19, 2013 6:42 pm

There's an underground bunker at a radio station in Charlotte, N.C., where time has stopped. Built decades ago to provide safety and vital communications in the event of a nuclear attack, it's now a perfectly preserved relic of Cold War fear that's gained new relevance.

The secret bunker is part of the office lore that old-timers at WBT Radio whisper to the newbies. That's how radio host Mike Collins learned of it back in the 1980s.

Read more
The Salt
2:36 pm
Tue December 18, 2012

One Airport's Trash Is 2 Million Worms' Treasure

Charlotte Douglas International Airport has deployed an army of 1.9 million worms to eat through its organic waste. The airport has reduced the trash it sends to the landfill by 70 percent.
Julie Rose

Originally published on Thu December 20, 2012 3:16 pm

Food waste is not just a problem for restaurants — airports also have to deal with piles of this kind of garbage.

Read more
Around the Nation
4:24 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

Mug Shot Time? Wipe That Smile Off Your Face

Say cheese? A sampling of smiling mug shots posted to the Mecklenburg County Sheriff's website during the past three weeks.
Jennifer Lang of WFAE

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 6:46 pm

In one North Carolina county, mugging too much for a mug shot can get you locked in a cell indefinitely.

First off, though, why would you smile for a mug shot? Thumb through those publications like The Slammer magazine filled with nothing but mug shots and you can find entire sections of people grinning it up.

Read more
NPR Story
4:52 am
Tue October 16, 2012

Bank Of America Improves Foreclosure Image

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 10:45 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Bank of America will release quarterly earnings tomorrow and once again, foreclosures will be part of the equation. The Charlotte-based bank's role in the 2008 housing crash has landed it on a fair number of lists of most hated institutions in America.

But, as Julie Rose of member station WFAE in Charlotte discovered, some of those most involved in cleaning up the aftermath of the foreclosure crisis are beginning to soften toward the bank.

Read more
Politics
6:24 am
Sun September 2, 2012

Before DNC, Contrasting Views Of Host City

The Democratic National Convention begins this week in Charlotte, N.C. WFAE's Julie Rose looks at what this city's boosters want visitors and TV viewers to know about Charlotte and what they're trying to paper over.

Election 2012
3:58 am
Tue August 28, 2012

Gov. Haley Gets Prime-Time Convention Speaking Slot

South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley campaigns in Ann Arbor, Mich., on July 31 for Mitt Romney.
Charles V. Tines AP

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 9:32 am

Among the speakers with a prime-time slot at the Republican National Convention in Tampa this week is South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley. The speech could propel her into national politics.

The talk about Haley always mentions her gender, her age — 40 — and her race — Indian-American. She wears the labels proudly, and for $19.95 you can read all about them in her memoir Can't Is Not an Option. But there's another label Haley likes: fighter.

On Comedy Central not long ago, she mixed it up with fellow South Carolinian Stephen Colbert:

Read more
Law
4:12 pm
Fri August 17, 2012

North Carolina Eugenics Victims Plan Next Steps

Rita Thompson Swords was sterilized by a doctor after delivering her second child. She was 21, unwed and poor, a combination that made her unfit for more children, according to the North Carolina Eugenics Board.
Julie Rose for NPR

Originally published on Fri August 17, 2012 6:03 pm

North Carolina was poised to become the first state to compensate people who had been sterilized against their will under decades of eugenics laws. More than half of states had forced sterilization laws, but North Carolina's were particularly aggressive.

A bill to pay the victims nearly passed in recent months. But "nearly" isn't enough for the victims who risked their reputations to go public with their stories.

Now they — and their advocates — wonder what comes next.

Read more
U.S.
3:04 pm
Tue December 6, 2011

For Unions, Democratic Convention Means Business

Many local businesses fear they won't win contracts for the 2012 Democratic National Convention because they can't boast a "union bug," like the small blue oval above, that can be found on some material printed by Consolidated Press.
Courtesy of Consolidated Press

Originally published on Tue December 6, 2011 10:26 pm

Organizers of the 2012 Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C., face a bit of a conundrum as they try to honor their party's deep ties to organized labor in a state with the lowest percentage of unionized workers in the nation. Local businesses worry they'll be passed over for unionized competitors, which are few and far between in the right-to-work state.

Read more