Jackie Northam

Jackie Northam is Foreign Affairs correspondent for NPR news. The veteran journalist has more than two decades of experience covering the world's hot spots and reporting on a broad tapestry of international and foreign policy issues.

Based in Washington, D.C., Northam is assigned to the leading stories of the day, traveling regularly overseas to report the news - from Afghanistan and Pakistan, to earthquake-ravaged Haiti.

Northam just completed a five year stint as NPR's National Security Correspondent, covering US defense and intelligence policies. She led the network's coverage of the US military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, traveling regularly to the controversial base to report on conditions there, and on US efforts to prosecute detainees.

Northam spent more than a decade as a foreign correspondent. She reported from Beirut during the war between Hezbollah and Israel in 2006, from Iraq after the fall of Saddam Hussein, and from Saudi Arabia during the first Gulf War. She lived in and reported extensively from Southeast Asia, Indochina, and Eastern Europe, where she charted the fall of communism.

While based in Nairobi, Kenya, Northam covered the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. She managed to enter the country just days after the slaughter of ethnic Tutsis began by hitching a ride with a French priest who was helping Rwandans escape to neighboring Burundi.

A native of Canada, Northam's first overseas reporting post was London, where she spent seven years covering stories on Margaret Thatcher's Britain and efforts to create the European Union.

Northam has received multiple journalism awards during her career, including Associated Press awards, regional Edward R. Murrow awards, and was part of an NPR team journalists that won an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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The Two-Way
1:05 pm
Wed April 29, 2015

Game Of Thrones: Saudi King Shakes Up Line Of Succession

Saudi King Salman (center) appears alongside then-Crown Prince Muqrin bin Abdulaziz (third from left) and then-deputy Crown Prince and Interior Minister Mohammed bin Nayef (left) in January. Muqrin has since been pushed aside to make way for Mohammed.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 11:34 am

Saudi Arabia's King Salman has issued a series of royal decrees bringing about a dramatic reshuffling in the line of succession and ushering in a younger generation to take up key ministerial positions.

This is the second major shake-up to the ranks of power in the kingdom since the 79-year-old Salman assumed the throne Jan. 23.

(There are roughly 15,000 princes and princesses in Saudi Arabia, but power is consolidated among a few. You can follow along with this helpful Wall Street Journal family tree.)

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The Two-Way
12:35 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

As Curfew Goes Into Effect, Baltimore Police Clear Defiant Crowds

A man on a bicycle greets Maryland state troopers on Tuesday in the aftermath of rioting in Baltimore.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Wed April 29, 2015 7:05 am

Updated at 10:55 p.m. ET:

As the curfew declared by Baltimore's mayor goes into effect, a number of protesters — hundreds, according to The Associated Press — are refusing to leave the streets, and are facing off against gathered police officers.

Protesters threw objects at the police when they first advanced on the crowd, and police responded with smoke grenades and flash grenades at about 10:25 p.m.

To the southeast, National Guard troops could be seen stationed in the city's Inner Harbor entertainment district.

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Politics
4:25 pm
Mon April 27, 2015

U.S., Japan Announce Updated Defense Guidelines

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 8:14 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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The Two-Way
4:35 am
Mon April 27, 2015

For Japan's Prime Minister, U.S. Visit A Chance To Elevate Image

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe with U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter earlier this month in Tokyo. Abe's visit to the U.S. this week features an agreement for the Japanese military to have a more active role.
Franck Robichon AP

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 5:42 pm

Japan's Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe, is in the U.S. this week for a tightly packed visit that will focus largely on the strong ties between the U.S. and its closest Asian ally.

There was a time not so long ago that the prime minister's office in Tokyo appeared to have a revolving door. Japan went through four prime ministers during President Obama's first three years in office.

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Parallels
3:50 am
Wed April 22, 2015

Merchant Ships Called On To Aid Migrants In Mediterranean Feel The Strain

The King Jacob, a Portuguese-flagged cargo vessel, was the first ship to arrive near the migrant boat that sank off the Libyan coast over the weekend. The boat had been carrying more than 800 people.
Alessandro Fucarini AP

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 2:22 pm

Italian prosecutors say the ship carrying hundreds of migrants that sank over the weekend most likely crashed against a cargo ship that had come to its rescue.

Merchant ships are often called on to help rescue migrants on vessels attempting to cross the Mediterranean. So when a distress call went out late Saturday evening from the overloaded migrant vessel, commercial vessels in the region responded.

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The Two-Way
1:59 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Iran Charges 'Washington Post' Reporter With Espionage

Jason Rezaian, an Iranian-American correspondent for the Washington Post, faces four serious charges, including espionage, according to his lawyer. He's shown in 2013.
Vahid Salemi AP

Iran is charging a Washington Post reporter with four crimes, including espionage, the newspaper said today. This is the first time the precise charges against Jason Rezaian, the Post's bureau chief in Tehran, have been made public since he was detained by the Iranian authorities nine months ago.

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The Two-Way
3:19 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Why A Blockbuster Of A Trade Deal With Asia Matters

Freighters wait to unload cargo at the Tanjung Pagar container port in Singapore.
Roslan Rahman AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 5:51 pm

It has been a decade in the making, but when completed, it will be a free trade agreement to beat all others — representing 40 percent of the world's economy.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP, agreement would bring together the economies of the U.S., Japan, Australia and nine other Pacific Rim nations, allowing the free trade of everything from agriculture to automobiles and textiles to pharmaceuticals.

President Obama said Friday that the deal is critical for the U.S. market.

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The Two-Way
8:44 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

Feds Cancel Commercial Sardine Fishing After Stocks Crash

A tray of sardines in Costa Mesa, California, in this November 17, 2014 photo. Plummeting sardine populations force a complete ban on sardine fishing off the U.S. West Coast for more than a year.
LUCY NICHOLSON Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 7:58 am

Life has suddenly gotten easier for the sardine. Federal regulators are not only closing the commercial sardine fishing season early in Oregon, Washington and California, but it will stay closed for more than a year.

The decision to shut down the sardine harvest is an effort to build up depleted stocks of the small, oily fish. The conservation group, Oceana, says that sardine populations have crashed more than 90 percent since 2007.

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The Two-Way
11:32 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Pro-Russia Journalist Shot Dead In Ukraine

Oles Buzyna, a Ukrainian journalist seen here in 2012 who was known for his pro-Russia views, was gunned down in broad daylight in Kiev on Thursday.
Sergei Vaganov AP

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 12:34 pm

A senior Ukrainian journalist known for his pro-Russia stance has been shot dead in Kiev, one day after a former pro-Russia lawmaker was found dead in the Ukrainian capital.

Oles Buzyna, 45, had recently resigned as editor-in-chief of the daily newspaper Sevodnya. Ukraine's interior ministry said in a statement that he was killed Thursday afternoon by two masked gunmen shooting from a passing car, according to The Associated Press.

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The Two-Way
3:10 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

Documents Show Global Outpouring Of Grief Over Lincoln's Assassination

An engraving of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln at Ford's Theatre in Washington on April 14, 1865. Lincoln died the next day.
De Agostini Picture Library De Agostini/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 4:24 pm

"The exhibition of profound grief was such as I have never seen equalled. Several overcome by their emotion, sat down upon the very ground and wept."

That was how Thomas Nelson, a U.S. minister to Chile, described the reaction of ordinary citizens in Spain to the news of President Abraham Lincoln's assassination in 1865.

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