Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

On Christmas Day, The Salt Lake Tribune denounced Sen. Orrin Hatch's "utter lack of integrity" and called for him to end his 42-year career in the Senate.

Hatch, in response, told the paper he was "grateful for this great Christmas honor."

In Liberia, voters are heading to the polls to decide on their next president, choosing between an international soccer star or the nation's long-time vice president.

President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, a Nobel Peace Prize winner and the first female head of state elected in Africa, is stepping down at 79, after two terms in office.

The runoff election to determine her replacement is noteworthy — this will be the first time in 70 years that one democratically elected Liberian government passes power to another legitimately elected government.

Erica Garner, a 27-year-old activist whose father's dying words became a rallying cry for protest against police brutality, has been hospitalized in serious condition after a heart attack, according to multiple reports.

Eric Garner, a black man who died in 2014 after a white NYPD officer put him in a chokehold, was recorded repeatedly telling the officer, "I can't breathe." A grand jury did not indict any officers over his death, a decision that prompted protests across the country.

Alexei Navalny, an outspoken critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin, will not be allowed to run in next year's presidential election in Russia, officials announced on Monday.

Putin is anticipated to win re-election yet again, continuing nearly two decades of dominance over Russian politics.

"Navalny is implicitly barred from running for office because of a conviction in a fraud case which has been viewed as political retribution," The Associated Press writes. "He could have run if he [were] given a special dispensation or if his conviction was cancelled."


A suicide bomber in Kabul killed at least 6 people in an attack early Monday, near the Afghan intelligence agency.

The Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the attack through its news agency Amaq.

One of the victims was a woman traveling in a car as it was passing by the site of the explosion, The Associated Press reports.

The exact target of the attack is unclear, the AP says.

Reuters, which confirmed five deaths with the Afghan interior ministry, reports that all of the known victims were civilians.

A winter storm system delivered Christmas Eve snow to Detroit, Chicago and other parts of the Midwest, and is now passing over the Northeast. Snow and sleet also struck some parts of the Pacific Northwest.

That means families in parts of the country woke up to a white Christmas, with corresponding joy or a touch of dread (depending, in no small part, on who has snow-shoveling duties).

And there's more to come for the states north of Pennsylvania.

In Los Angeles, Cleveland, Boston and other communities across America, people gathered on Thursday to honor the lives of the homeless people who died in 2017.

Dec. 21 — the winter solstice, the day with the longest night of the year — was named as the 2017 National Homeless Persons' Memorial Day by several advocacy groups.

A horse-drawn carriage company in Philadelphia is shutting down at the behest of city officials, after inspectors found the company was violating building codes and animal welfare laws.

The Philadelphia Carriage Co.'s horses will be handed over to the city and ultimately sent to a sanctuary, The Associated Press reports. The company's closure means one company continues to offer horse-drawn carriage tours in the historic section of the city.

The city has spent six months attempting to get control of the horses, the AP writes.

Six people who were arrested at protests during President Trump's inauguration in January have been found not guilty of charges of property destruction and rioting, in the first of a series of trials over Inauguration Day demonstrations.

As the sun sets on this winter solstice, bringing an end to the shortest day of the year, headlights will flicker on in traffic jams across the country, according to estimates from AAA.

Wednesday and Thursday afternoon were expected to see the most crowded roads for this holiday season.

In New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Houston, the worst day for travel was Wednesday.

The European Union has taken unprecedented steps toward punishing Poland for a series of laws that have upended the checks and balances of Polish government. Through a never-before-implemented process, Poland could face sanctions, potentially including a loss of voting rights within the EU — although Hungary is expected to block the worst of the repercussions.

The Human Rights Campaign, working with artist Robin Bell, projected words like "fetus" and "transgender" onto the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday night, to protest the words being included on a "forbidden" list circulating at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Let's just say his night took a swan dive.

Police rescued a 36-year-old man from the center of Lake Eola in Orlando, Fla, in the wee hours of Friday morning, after he hijacked a boat to visit some friends and got stuck on a fountain.

Facebook is expanding its use of facial recognition software to alert users when photos of them are posted on the platform — whether or not they are tagged in the photo.

By default, Facebook users in the U.S. will be signed up for these face recognition alerts, unless they have previously opted out of a similar, more limited feature. But users can turn off face recognition, Facebook says.

Additionally, the company says it will roll out new tools to alert users if someone else may be impersonating them with a misleading profile photo.

A new president in real life means a new president at Magic Kingdom, too.

Specifically, a new animatronic figure in the Hall of Presidents at Walt Disney World, where every former leader of the republic is depicted in an "audio-animatronics show."

The exhibit is currently closed for updates and maintenance, but Disney has released a sneak peak of the new addition.

Adolescent female monkeys in Japan have repeatedly engaged in sexual behaviors with sika deer, for reasons that are not yet clear, according to researchers who study macaque behavior.

The study, published in the peer-reviewed Archives of Sexual Behavior, follows up on a single report from earlier this year of a male macaque mounting a female sika deer on Yakushima Island.

Updated at 3:15 p.m. ET

A grand jury tasked with investigating broad issues of hazing at Penn State has issued a blistering report asserting that leaders at the university were well aware of pervasive misbehavior in the Greek system and failed to take action.

Penn State, responding in court, said that the university has "shown an unwavering commitment to promoting safety and accountability" and that alcohol abuse at college is a "national problem," not a university-specific one.

As public support for the death penalty wanes, the number of executions and projected death sentences in 2017 rose only slightly, remaining at nearly 25-year lows, according to the annual report released Thursday by the Death Penalty Information Center.

There were 23 executions this year, the center says. Over the past 25 years, only last year's total, 20, was lower.

Updated at 11:50 a.m. ET

Minnesota Lt. Gov. Tina Smith has been appointed to fill the U.S. Senate seat left vacant by Al Franken's upcoming resignation.

Smith, a Democrat, will serve until January 2019. She also plans to run in a special election next year to serve out the entirety of Franken's term, which ends in 2020, according to a source who spoke to Minnesota Public Radio.

Last week, another human foot washed ashore near Sooke, Canada, on Vancouver Island — the 13th foot found in British Columbia in the last decade.

Human feet have also had a tendency to wash ashore in Washington state.

The most recent foot (with lower leg bones tibia and fibula attached) was encountered by a man walking his dogs in the town of Jordan River, the CBC reports.

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

The Golden Globe nominations were announced this morning. Among the nominees is Christopher Plummer for a role he played as a last-minute replacement for Kevin Spacey. NPR's Camila Domonoske reports.

The color of the year for 2018 is a vivid purple, according to Pantone, which gives the title to a new hue every December.

Specifically, "PANTONE 18-3838 Ultra Violet" is the chosen hue. ("Ultra violet" with a space, we'll note: actual "ultraviolet" light is, by definition, invisible.)

Updated at 2:55 p.m. ET

"I have determined that it is time to officially recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel," President Trump said in a controversial address from the White House on Wednesday afternoon. He also directed the State Department to "begin preparation to move the American Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem."

The Army, Navy, Marines and Air Force all regularly fail to submit required crime data to the FBI for inclusion in national databases, but the Air Force has shown improvement over the past several years, according to a new report released by the Department of Defense Office of the Inspector General.

Maltese police have arrested 10 suspects in connection to the October assassination of investigative journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia, who was renowned for her unflinching scrutiny of the corrupt and powerful on the Mediterranean island nation.

All of the suspects are from Malta and most have criminal records, NPR's Frank Langfitt reports, citing Maltese Prime Minister Joseph Muscat.

Frank reports that the FBI is assisting with the investigation into Caruana Galizia's murder, which drew international attention:

Netflix will film eight more episodes of House of Cards, in a final season that will feature female lead Robin Wright — with former star Kevin Spacey cut out of the show completely.

Four Catalan politicians and activists will remain in Spanish custody after a judge denied bail for the separatist leaders — including the erstwhile vice president of Catalonia, who is on the ballot for special elections on Dec. 21 and will be campaigning from behind bars.

Six other separatist leaders have been released on bail, to the tune of 100,000 euros (about $118,000) each, The Associated Press reports. The judge also ordered the confiscation of those politicians' passports.

Updated at 8 p.m. ET

CVS is preparing to buy the health insurance giant Aetna for $69 billion, the companies say.

Updated at 8:45 p.m. ET

James Levine, a legendary conductor at the Metropolitan Opera, has been accused of sexually abusing a teenager in Illinois for a period of several years in the 1980s.

Charges went off. Smoke went up.

But the Pontiac Silverdome didn't come down.

The aging structure in Michigan — the former home of the Detroit Lions, and at one time the largest NFL stadium — was slated for demolition on Sunday, but the explosion was a failure.

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