Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for, and editing and producing stories for's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

In the latest twist to the story of a Texas high school student who became a celebrity after he was arrested over a project in which he rebuilt a digital clock, Ahmed Mohamed and his family are moving to Qatar, where Mohamed, 14, has accepted a scholarship.

The news comes on the heels of Mohamed meeting President Obama at the White House Astronomy Night on Monday.

A U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18 Hornet fighter jet crashed northeast of Cambridge, England, Wednesday morning; officials say the pilot did not survive the crash. The plane had taken off from RAF Lakenheath in Suffolk.

"Response efforts are under way and the incident is currently under investigation," the Marine Corps says.

Update at 1:30 p.m. ET: Details On Plane And Flight

In his first known international trip since civil war began in Syria, President Bashar Assad has just returned from a quick visit in Moscow with Russian President Vladimir Putin. Assad reportedly briefed Putin on Syria's current and future military operations.

Assad's trip was kept secret until after Tuesday's meeting — and after the Syrian leader's safe return home.

Saying that thousands of people have overwhelmed its infrastructure at Slovenia's border with Croatia, Slovenia is moving to deploy its army. More than 6,000 people arrived Tuesday, Slovenia's interior minister says, with more than 18,000 reaching Slovenia since Friday.

Ahmed Mohamed, the Texas student who was arrested and suspended from high school for bringing a homemade clock to class, attended a science event at the White House on Monday night.

Canadian news outlets are calling it a "Liberal wave." After nearly a decade in office, Stephen Harper has been ousted as Canada's prime minister, falling to the Liberal Party's Justin Trudeau. Losing his bid for a fourth term, Harper will also step down as leader of the Conservative Party.

Classes resumed at Umpqua Community College this morning, and as students made their way to school buildings, they were greeted by Gov. Kate Brown and hundreds of well-wishers. Classes at the Roseburg, Ore., campus had been suspended since the Oct. 1 shooting that left nine victims dead.

The attack came on the first week of classes at Umpqua; this past weekend, families and loved ones held memorial services and funerals for many of the victims of the shooting.

From Jefferson Public Radio, Liam Moriarty reports for our Newscast unit:

After three years and more than $15 million in police expense, Scotland Yard says it's removing the guards that have waited outside the Ecuadorian Embassy in London for a chance to arrest WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange.

Instead of stalking Assange with an overt 24-hour presence, London's Metropolitan Police announced Monday, the agency "will deploy a number of overt and covert tactics to arrest him."

If legal marijuana were a movie, the $11 million that's estimated to have been taken in during Oregon's first week of retail sales would place it fourth on the list of U.S. weekend box-office receipts, right behind Pan.

Rebel groups that oppose both Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and terrorist group ISIS have formed a new coalition, called the Syrian Democratic Forces. Led by Kurds, the coalition could receive U.S. air support in Syria.

From Beirut, NPR's Alison Meuse reports for our Newscast unit:

"The Syrian Democratic Forces calls itself a unified national military, aimed at establishing a new democratic Syria. Members include Kurds, Arabs and Assyrian Christians. But those familiar with the group say it's led by the Kurdish YPG, the only partner the U.S. trusts.