Asma Khalid

Asma Khalid is a political reporter. She travels the country focusing on voters through the lens of demographics and economics.

Before joining NPR's political team, Asma helped launch a new team for Boston's NPR station WBUR where she reported on biz/tech and the Future of Work.

She's reported on a range of stories over the years — including the 2016 presidential campaign, the Boston Marathon bombings and the trial of James "Whitey" Bulger.

Asma got her start in journalism in her home state of Indiana, but was introduced to radio through an internship at BBC Newshour in London during grad school.

These days the Web can seem like a dark place, filled with internet trolls and divisive discourse. But the man who invented the World Wide Web 28 years ago is still optimistic (sort of).

That man is Tim Berners-Lee, and on Tuesday he was awarded the prestigious Turing Award for his invention. It's an honor thought of as a Nobel Prize for computer science that comes with a $1 million award from Google.

What if your friend the robot could tell what you're thinking, without you saying a word?

David Betras realized Hillary Clinton's odds of winning the presidency were in peril — back in March of last year.

Betras, the chairman of the Mahoning County Democratic Party, lives in an area of Ohio that traditionally votes for Democrats. But during the Ohio primary, Betras saw 18 people on his own precinct committee defect and cross party lines to vote Republican.

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There were two major assumptions about Latino voters throughout the presidential campaign:

(1) a record number of Latinos would show up on Election Day to oppose Donald Trump's candidacy and

(2) the anti-immigration rhetoric that launched Trump's campaign would push conservative-leaning Hispanics to flee the Republican Party.

Neither of those assumptions entirely panned out as expected.

Prediction 1: The Surge?

Editor's note: There is language in this piece that some will find offensive.

Sometime in early 2016 between a Trump rally in New Hampshire, where a burly man shouted something at me about being Muslim, and a series of particularly vitriolic tweets that included some combination of "raghead," "terrorist," "bitch" and "jihadi," I went into my editor's office and wept.

I cried for the first (but not the last) time this campaign season.

For more than a hundred years, Vigo County, Indiana has consistently voted for the winning president. It chose Barack Obama twice, and then picked Donald Trump this November. In fact, the county is a remarkably accurate bellwether; it's only been wrong two times since the 1890s.

Why does Vigo County almost always predict the winner?

There are many hypotheses, none of which fully explain this quirky mystery of why a small region in southwest Indiana (a reliably Republican state) routinely jumps from Democrat to Republican in presidential years.

Millennials might have been Hillary Clinton's Achilles' heel on Tuesday night.

Obama won 60 percent of the millennial vote. Clinton got only about 55 percent. (We're using "millennials" as shorthand for voters between the ages of 18 and 29, but some millennials are in their 30s).

But it's not that young voters across the country were necessarily flocking to the Republican Party this year.

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Turnout was a problem for younger voters in Pennsylvania, but what about the rest of the country? NPR's Asma Khalid covers demographics and joins me now. Hey there.

ASMA KHALID, BYLINE: Hey, how are you?

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Hillary Clinton's bringing out big-name celebrities to energize her Democratic base ahead of the election, like Beyonce who performed for Mrs. Clinton at a concert last night in Cleveland. NPR's Asma Khalid reports.

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First lady Michelle Obama has emerged as Hillary Clinton's most powerful advocate in the campaign. She has even given the Clinton campaign a lasting slogan.

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Throughout the show today, we're checking in with states still up for grabs as we come down to the wire. Elsewhere this hour, we'll hear from Arizona. First, NPR's Asma Khalid - she went to Ohio to figure out why the race there is so tight.

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And Donald Trump's tax returns, or lack of tax returns, have turned into campaign fodder for Hillary Clinton. In Ohio yesterday, Clinton slammed Trump's tax history, as NPR's Asma Khalid reports.

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We're going to hear about the candidates' performance in last night's presidential debate and ask, did it change anyone's minds? But first, here's a bit of Hillary Clinton last night.

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Hillary Clinton has a problem with young voters. She doesn't excite them as a candidate in the same way that Barack Obama did when he ran.

Muslims are a tiny fraction of the U.S. population, making up somewhere around one percent, according to the Pew Research Center.

But a lot of Muslims live in key battleground states like Florida, Virginia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Ohio, which makes them a small but important group.

That's why Hillary Clinton's campaign is trying to make sure they show up in large numbers on Election Day.

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Hillary Clinton's "basket of deplorables" remark has echoed through the political interwebs and produced many rounds of cable TV analysis.

Sure, conservatives pounced. And some liberals laughed in agreement. But does it matter in the real world?

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Hillary Clinton is starting to focus more on Hillary Clinton and less on Donald Trump. This comes in a week when Clinton released a policy book with her running mate. Much of her campaign has focused on white papers and policy proposals.

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North Carolina is the ultimate battleground turf this election season. Barack Obama narrowly won the state in 2008 by fewer than 15,000 votes, but he lost it in 2012.

Hillary Clinton would love to turn this Southern state blue again, and her success depends largely on black voters. In fact, she has no path to victory without African-Americans.

Millennials may be notorious for their low voter turnout, but they have growing political clout. This November, they'll rival baby boomers in terms of their sheer number of eligible voters. And that means they could be key deciders in battleground states. Theoretically, that ought to benefit a Democrat. But during the primaries, young voters were Hillary Clinton's Achilles' heel. Now Clinton is hoping they'll give her a second chance.

Hillary Clinton's recent surge in the polls is being fueled in part by a demographic that President Obama lost handily four years ago — white, college-educated voters.

"In over a half-century, no Democratic presidential candidate has carried white voters with a college degree," said Michelle Diggles, a senior political analyst with the center-left think tank Third Way, who described the split between the white working class and whites with a college degree as "the most underreported story of this year."

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