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Goats and Soda
2:58 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

This Suit Keeps Ebola Out — So How Can A Health Worker Catch It?

Protective gear runs from goggles and head covering to gloves and boots. This health worker was photographed leaving the isolation area at the treatment center in Kailahun, Sierra Leone.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 4:56 pm

The fight against Ebola in West Africa suffered a setback Wednesday. Dr. Sheik Umar Khan, one of the top doctors treating patients, caught the virus, even though he was wearing protective gear.

"Even with the full protective clothing you put on," Khan has said, "you are at risk."

That statement made us wonder about those yellow and white suits you see in photos: Just how good are they at protecting health workers from the bodily fluids that can transmit the virus — vomit, blood, sweat, mucus?

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The Two-Way
2:45 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Central American Presidents Say U.S. Shares Responsibility For Migration Crisis

President of Honduras Juan Orlando Hernandez, left, delivers remarks on immigration beside President of Guatemala Otto Perez Molina.
Michael Reynolds EPA /LANDOV

The presidents of Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador will meet with President Obama on Friday.

But before the meeting, the heads of state are making the rounds in Washington, telling their side of an immigration crisis that has driven tens of thousands of unaccompanied children to the U.S. border.

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NPR Ed
2:31 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Saving Lives In South Miami, One Pool At A Time

Tavarius Miller, 12, Jermaien Payne, 8, Kemarion Jones, 9, and Gary Kendrick, 8, all wait for the pool at Ransom Everglades School to open after an afternoon storm. The kids are bused over once a week from South Miami, which does not have a public pool.
Wilson Sayre WLRN

It's hot out. The usual midday thunderstorm has just passed, and the few kids hanging out on bleachers around the pool at Miami's Ransom Everglades School finally get the go-ahead to jump in and cool off.

Eight-year-old Gary Kendrick and the others are all here for swim lessons.

"They told us to hold on to the wall and kick our feet and, like, move our arms," Kendrick says. "When I had to swim to one of the counselors, I was really swimming. I ain't even know I was moving."

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Book Reviews
2:27 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

'Panic In A Suitcase' Puts A Fresh Spin On A Coming-To-America Story

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 4:45 pm

There's a wonderful 1982 memoir called An Orphan in History by the late Village Voice writer Paul Cowan. It's about Cowan's search for his European Jewish roots, and in it he says something about the sacrifices of older generations of immigrants that's always stayed with me. Cowan says: "Millions of immigrant families . . . left the economically and culturally confining Old World towns where they were raised, and paid for the freedom and prosperity this country offered with their pasts."

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Iraq
2:27 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Human Rights Watch Researcher Reports ISIS Abuses In Iraq

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 3:01 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

U.S.
1:33 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Do Heat-Sensitive Inmates Have A Right To Air Conditioning?

Inmate dormitories at Louisiana State Penitentiary, like this one photographed in July 2011, have heating in the winter and cooling by fans and open windows in the summer, but no air conditioning. A judge ruled earlier this year that that constituted cruel and unusual punishment, but installation is on hold pending a state appeal.
Scott Threlkeld The Times-Picayune/Landov

Originally published on Fri July 25, 2014 7:04 pm

The exact cause of prisoner Jerome Murdough's death at Rikers Island in February is still under investigation. But the temperature in the cell when he was found in New York City's biggest jail was at least 100 degrees.

The death of Murdough, who had severe mental illness, called renewed attention to a long-standing problem: maintaining reasonable temperatures in jails and prisons.

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The Two-Way
1:01 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Zoo In Argentina Says 'Sad Bear' Too Old To Go To Canada

Arturo, the only polar bear in Argentina, lives in captivity at a zoo in Mendoza. The plight of the "sad bear" has spawned more than 400,000 signatures on a petition to get him moved to a "better life" in Canada.
AFP Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 1:55 pm

Despite a public outcry that resulted in more than a half-million petition signatures and a personal appeal by former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, Arturo, Argentina's "sad bear," has been deemed too old to migrate to Canada.

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Parallels
12:55 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Syrian President Issues New Stamps, But Can't Deliver The Mail

One of the three stamps issued recently to commemorate Syrian leader Bashar Assad's presidential election victory.
Via Syrian Arab News Agency

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 4:06 pm

As the Middle East froths with blood — from Iraq to Syria to the Gaza Strip — a commemorative set of three stamps depicting Syrian President Bashar Assad may not seem hugely relevant.

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Health
12:23 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Effective New HIV Treatment Makes Researcher 'Hopeful' In Fighting Epidemic

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Media
12:23 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Racially-Charged Casting Call: 'Surprising' But Not Shocking To Insiders

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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