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The Two-Way
7:30 am
Tue October 4, 2011

As Amanda Knox Heads Home, Murdered Girl's Family Seeks Answers

Arline Kercher and Lyle Kercher, the mother and brother of murder victim Meredith Kercher, on Monday in Perugia, Italy.

Franco Origlia Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 4, 2011 7:39 am

Her murder conviction overturned by an Italian appeals court, American Amanda Knox has left Italy and is making her way home to Seattle, The Associated Press reports.

Now, the BCC writes:

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The Two-Way
7:00 am
Tue October 4, 2011

Nobel Prize In Physics Honors Work On Expanding Universe

NASA Getty Images

Three U.S.-born scientists whose work indicates that the universe is expanding at an accelerating rate have been awarded the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics.

American Saul Perlmutter will share the $1.5 million award with U.S.-Australian Brian Schmidt and U.S. scientist Adam Riess, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced this morning.

In its statement announcing the honors, the academy writes that

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Politics
2:49 am
Tue October 4, 2011

Activists Press Obama To Renew Progressive Stand

Originally published on Tue October 4, 2011 9:52 am

Progressive activists played a big role in helping President Obama get elected. But in the years since, the big story of political activism has been the conservative Tea Party movement.

Hoping to reverse that trend, 2,000 people have registered for the annual "Take Back the American Dream Conference" this week in Washington, D.C. That's more than double the number at the 2010 event.

Shamako Noble, 31, of San Jose, Calif., comes every year and says he has learned that work can't stop, even after the election is over.

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Media
12:01 am
Tue October 4, 2011

NPR's New Chief Faces Tough Choices On Funding

Incoming NPR CEO and President Gary Knell.

Sesame Workshop

On Sunday, former NPR CEO Vivian Schiller tweeted a strong endorsement for the choice of Gary Knell to replace her. In the same 140 characters, however, Schiller characterized continued federal funding of public radio as "untenable."

Schiller has told associates the subsidy allows lawmakers to use NPR unfairly as a political punching bag.

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Business
12:01 am
Tue October 4, 2011

Design, Price Are Keys To Success For Hyundai

A Hyundai Genesis Coupe is on display in a showroom in Glendale, Calif., last January.

Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Despite a sluggish economy in the U.S., it's been a really good year for Hyundai. The Korean automaker is on track to sell more cars this year than ever before, and it has seen its share of the U.S. market more than double in the past decade.

At first glance, Hyundai may appear to be resorting to slick marketing gimmicks. For instance, the company will guarantee the price of your car, not now but when you trade it in.

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The Salt
12:01 am
Tue October 4, 2011

Eating Meals With Men May Mean Eating Less

It turns out that the gender of your dining companions makes a big difference in what you eat and how much you eat. The new research on dining habits — although small — adds a new dimension to the study of risk factors for obesity, and could also shed new light on eating disorders such as anorexia.

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World
12:01 am
Tue October 4, 2011

Tough Choices For Greece's Youth In Economic Crisis

Stella Kasdagli, 30, and her husband Alexandros Karamalikis, 35, are trying to make ends meet. Karamalikis lost his job and and is now a stay-at-home father, raising their 13-month-old daughter

Sylvia Poggioli NPR

Originally published on Tue October 4, 2011 8:19 pm

The financial crisis gripping Greece is having a major impact on the country's young people. A two-tier labor market that favors the older generation and draconian austerity measures have triggered a record high jobless rate among those under 35.

And now, the economic upheaval is undermining the traditional family structure and pushing the young to leave their homeland for better prospects.

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Politics
12:01 am
Tue October 4, 2011

Running The Government On Temporary Extensions

Originally published on Sat December 15, 2012 1:54 pm

The U.S. House of Representatives is scheduled to vote Tuesday on a temporary measure — passed by the Senate last week — to keep the government funded through mid-November.

"Hopefully, we can certainly avoid any shutdown talk this time," said House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va. "Get it done and continue along our mission to try and change the way spending occurs in this town."

These temporary funding extensions, lasting a few days or a few weeks, are pretty standard in Washington. Called "continuing resolutions," they go all the way back to 1876.

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The Two-Way
7:26 pm
Mon October 3, 2011

Cities Win Dubious Prize: Most Stuffy Noses

Mowing his lawn, Shane Nantz kicks up a cloud of pollen at his Charlotte, N.C., home, in this file photo from April, 2010. The city is No. 8 on a recent America's Most Congested list.

Todd Sumlin AP

Originally published on Mon October 3, 2011 7:28 pm

If mold, dust and other culprits are shutting down your nasal passages, you might find it useful to know which U.S. cities' residents have it even worse. It turns out that people living in Oklahoma City, Okla., suffer the most nasal congestion of any metropolitan area in America.

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The Two-Way
6:16 pm
Mon October 3, 2011

Shares In American Airlines' Parent Company Sink

As fears spread that American Airlines may be headed for bankruptcy proceedings, shares in the airline's parent company, AMR Corp., plummeted by 41 percent before closing at $1.98 Monday — a 33 percent drop in its value.

The stock hadn't closed below $2 since 2003, according to the Associated Press.

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