NPR News

Global markets react to first presidential debate

Sep 27, 2016
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Marketplace staff

Financial markets around the world reacted to last night’s presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, with some adjustments to views of the upcoming U.S. election.

In currency markets, traders are taking the view that Trump is now less likely to win. The Canadian dollar and the Mexican peso spiked up. In the case of the peso, it went up about 2 percent in morning trading, the biggest gain in seven months.

The U.S. is targeting a Chinese company and the people who run it for allegedly helping North Korea with its nuclear weapons program. It closely follows the North's fifth nuclear test, which took place earlier this month.

"Each new nuclear test...spurs this kind of scramble to do something," says John Delury, a professor of international relations at Seoul's Yonsei University. "And sanctions is the kind of preferred choice."

The list of preventive services that women can receive without paying anything out of pocket under the health law could grow if recommendations from a group of mostly medical providers are adopted by federal officials later this year.

You could see the contrast in the eyes of the respective candidates' spokespersons, surrogates and family members after the first presidential debate of 2016 had wrapped.

As always, earnest efforts were made on both sides to claim victory — even insist on it — after the nationally televised clash between Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican nominee Donald Trump.

"Trump was especially strong on the issues in the first 45 minutes," said former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski on CNN.

For the past couple of decades, night owls with the munchies have flocked to a certain street in Beijing that is packed with all-night restaurants. The sidewalks are jammed with cars and have a perpetual patina of rancid-smelling cooking oil.

One of the trendier restaurants on the block is called A Very Long Time Ago. The decor is upscale Paleolithic, with silhouettes of cavemen traipsing across the walls. The clientele is not so fossilized. They're mostly 20-somethings who roast skewers of food over hot coals.

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Mariam Baksh

There was lots of hype beforehand about how last night’s presidential debate could be among the most-watched in history, and a money maker for the networks showing it.

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Kim Adams

One of the many testy exchanges of the first 2016 presidential debate came on the topic of trade. Republican nominee Donald Trump accused his Democratic opponent, Hillary Clinton, of supporting the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the massive trade deal covering a dozen Pacific Rim countries.

Clinton has distanced herself from the deal throughout this campaign, and did so again last night.

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Eilis O'Neill

Paul and Maureen Knapp are fourth-generation dairy farmers in upstate New York.  For years, they struggled to make ends meet.

Maureen Knapp recalls thinking, “We don’t know if we can pay the help or, you know, pay the machinery bill.”

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David Brancaccio

Despite some modest progress in the last few years, women are still underrepresented in the workplace, according to a new joint study from the nonprofit Lean In and the consulting firm McKinsey & Co.

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton went head-to-head Monday night in the first presidential debate.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, live annotated the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are underlined in yellow, followed by context and fact check.

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