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Puerto Rico is in full-on disaster-response mode after powerful Hurricane Maria hit yesterday. There is no power on the entire island and almost no running water. There have been landslides, flooding and widespread structural damage.

Another Good Reason Not To Pee In The Pool

Sep 21, 2017

Water parks can be fun, but they also can pose unexpected health risks – in this case, eye and respiratory problems. And that shower you never take before you get in the pool plays a role.

In July 2015, patrons at an indoor water park resort in Ohio started to complain about eye and respiratory problems. Local health officials surveyed patrons and water park employees, who reported issues like eye burning, nose irritation, difficulty breathing and vomiting. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention then stepped in to investigate.

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When filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick began research for a 10-part PBS documentary on the Vietnam War, they thought they knew the material. After all, Burns was of draft age in 1970, though his draft number was too high for him to be called to serve.

But as they began interviewing subjects and sorting through archival footage, Burns and Novick soon came to appreciate just how complicated the war was. "We went in, both of us, with this kind of arrogance about it, and immediately had that blown out of the water," Burns says. "We realized we knew nothing."

Ah, to be a chef with three Michelin stars: The envy of your peers. Reservation lists months long. The satisfaction of reaching the highest level of culinary art.

The crippling pressure to stay on top.

Sébastien Bras runs Le Suquet, a restaurant in the southern French town of Laguiole that first won its three stars in 1999, when it was run by his father Michel.

Let's do the numbers: on private jets

Sep 21, 2017

President Trump has expensive taste and a penchant for spending.

What do Bolivia, Belgium, Burkina Faso, China, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ecuador, Egypt, India, Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, Scotland, South Africa, the United States and Vietnam all have in common?

The pervasive idea is that girls are vulnerable and that boys are strong and independent.

Bedecked in fondant and flowers, modern wedding cakes are the centerpiece of the marriage feast — an edible form of art. But are they also an expression of free speech?

That is the question the Supreme Court will consider this fall when it hears the case of a Colorado baker who refused to make a custom wedding cake for a gay couple because he said it would violate his religious beliefs.

"You'd think cake would be apolitical, and yet here we are," muses baker Catherine George of Catherine George Cakes.

As we have shown in so many previous episodes of Alt.Latino, the cultural interchange between the U.S., Latin America and the Caribbean has been going on practically since there were people in these parts of the world.

Tens of thousands of people have taken to the streets in Barcelona, protesting the Spanish government and expressing support for a planned Oct. 1 vote on Catalan independence.

Spain considers the referendum to be illegal. On Wednesday, Spanish police with court-ordered search warrants seized millions of ballots and detained more than a dozen Catalan politicians. A top treasury official is being held on sedition charges, the BBC reports.

Google makes a $1 billion bet on hardware

Sep 21, 2017

In the everything old is new again department, Google is betting big on hardware. The company already bought and sold Motorola in the past five years and now Google’s announced it’ll pay $1.1 billion for a chunk of HTC. To be clear Google’s not acquiring the company here. It’s acqui-hiring pretty much the entire engineering department of the Taiwanese phone maker. So what’s the strategy here?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

The entire island of Puerto Rico is still without power today in the wake of Hurricane Maria. Local officials said it could take months to repair the damage and restore full service. And it won't be easy. The utility was already around $9 billion in debt before the hurricane and had filed for bankruptcy earlier this year. Now, there's a big repair bill and the problem of deciding who gets power back first. Puerto Rico's economy can't recover unless the businesses it depends on have electricity. But should they get priority over, say schools or residential areas?

Back-to-back natural disasters in Mexico and across the Caribbean have left millions of people reeling.

The headline unemployment rate we report every month from the Labor Department has been consistently low. According to economists we’re at or near what’s considered full employment.Employers have a record number of job openings, about 6 million right now, and say they can’t find workers to fill them, especially in fields like manufacturing and construction. Meanwhile, about 8.5 million people are either looking for work, or say they want to work but have given up looking.

What is EDGAR and why do we care if it was hacked?

Sep 21, 2017

The acronym of the day is EDGAR, which stands for Electronic Data Gathering Analysis and Retrieval.

It’s a platform created and run by the Securities and Exchange Commission. It could also be known, though, as the latest hacking victim in this economy. The SEC made the disclosure late last night that it'd been breached and added that it's possible some insider trading was done as a result. 

Facebook fights fires on multiple fronts

Sep 21, 2017

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced today that the company will give congressional investigators thousands of social and political ads from accounts associated with a Russian organization known as the Internet Research Agency. And while Zuckerberg was busy detailing that decision, Facebook's chief operating officer, Sheryl Sandberg, has been dealing with another tricky issue. ProPublica recently reported that Facebook advertisers could target ads using anti-Semitic keywords. Now, Sandberg has promised to strengthen its ad enforcement methodology.

Just over a year ago, Lillie Gumm, 63, woke up to find her Baton Rouge, Louisiana home filling with water.

"Within a matter of about maybe 30, 40 minutes, the water was just above my knees," Gumm said. "There was a very strong current in the water."

Gumm flagged down a passing school bus and, along with her grandson, caught a ride to higher ground, then a shelter.

09/21/2017: Facebook's ad trouble, explained

Sep 21, 2017

The drip-drip-drip of news about Russia and the 2016 election continues today. A week or so ago, Facebook said it sold about $100,000 worth of ads to a so-called Russian "troll farm." Today, the company announced it would show the ads to the government. Meanwhile, the company is working to improve its advertising process after ProPublica revealed users could target ads with anti-Semitic keywords. We'll start today's show by explaining all the fires Facebook is fighting. Then: all of Puerto Rico is still without power today, and it could take months to restore service.

Updated at 3:36 p.m. ET

President Trump ordered new economic sanctions Thursday against any bank or other company doing business with North Korea, in response to Pyongyang's renegade nuclear program.

The move is designed to tighten the economic screws on North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, in hopes of halting his development of nuclear warheads and the missiles to deliver them.

Updated at 4:35 p.m. ET

A strong earthquake that hit Mexico City and other central areas has killed at least 273 people, officials say. Search teams are working feverishly to find any survivors who were trapped.

In a cozy little restaurant called VIF, on the edge of Frankfurt’s financial district, the young owner Luise Hoepfner makes herself a cup of coffee and relaxes after the lunch time rush. Hoepfner is rather pleased with herself. She took a gamble opening her restaurant a year ago. Now she believes it will pay off, thanks to Brexit. 

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If there is one thing science is good for, it's going to extremes.

A lot of science's history is just one story after another of people figuring out how to do something that, just a few years before, was thought to be impossible.

The impossible was heavy on my mind last Wednesday as I found out just how close we were to seeing — as in taking actual pictures — of black holes.

NEW YORK (AP) — President Donald Trump signed an executive order Thursday aiming to tighten an economic noose around North Korea, days after he threatened to “totally destroy” the country if forced to defend the United States or its allies.

The new order enables the U.S. to sanction individual companies and institutions that finance trade with North Korea. It adds to U.S.-led international pressure against Kim Jong Un’s expanded missile and nuclear testing program that has stoked fears of nuclear war and dominated the president’s debut at this week’s U.N. General Assembly.

Here's What You Need To Know About Germany's Election

Sep 21, 2017

In these uncertain times, the international community has looked increasingly to Germany and its experienced, long-serving chancellor, for leadership.

That leader, Angela Merkel, looks set to return to office for her fourth term when Germans go to the polls on Sunday.

But even if she does, there's no guarantee it will be business as usual. Governments in Germany are most commonly formed as coalitions, and for now, it's unclear what the country's next coalition will end up looking like — and how that will affect Germany's global role.

Fossilized dinosaur feces are challenging some basic assumptions about dinosaur eating habits.

Hadrosaurs, a kind of duck-billed dinosaur, are among the most common herbivores of the Cretaceous period. But new research suggests that actually, these animals also chowed down on crustaceans. The prehistoric snacking was likely intentional and linked to mating behaviors.

The scientists found tell-tale crustacean shell pieces in samples of fossilized dinosaur feces about 75 million year old from the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southern Utah.

Preserving America's movie going history

Sep 21, 2017

Movie theaters had a tough time this summer, ticket sales were the worst the industry has seen for the summer season in over a decade. But the movie theater business has never been an easy one. Theaters have been opening and closing, rising and falling with economic tides for years. In one American city, Baltimore, Maryland, there were 129 theaters open in 1916, 119 remained in 1950, but by 2016 there were just three.

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