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It has been just a month since the death of Otto Warmbier — an American tourist jailed by North Korean authorities, sentenced to 15 years of hard labor for pulling down a propaganda poster, and eventually released to the U.S. in a coma under mysterious circumstances.

A 50-cent meningitis vaccine. Kid-friendly malaria drugs. A vaccine to prevent a deadly diarrheal disease.

These U.S.-funded global health innovations have saved millions of lives around the world. But they also come with an added bonus for Americans.

Updated at 4:50 p.m. ET

Attorney General Jeff Sessions says he will stay at his post for "as long as that is appropriate." That follows comments by President Trump, who said he wouldn't have appointed Sessions had he known Sessions would recuse himself from the investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

The Trump hotel: gold, glitz and lawsuits

Jul 20, 2017
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Nancy Marshall-Genzer

When it comes to President Trump's business dealings, there are still a lot of unanswered questions, including whether the president is breaking the law — and violating something known as the emoluments clause — by receiving payments from foreign governments. Not directly, but by way of their business at the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., which opened last year on the historic site of the Old Post Office and is still operated by Trump's company. And that's not the only headache the flashy new hotel is causing.

Updated at 12:24 p.m. ET

Beltway denizens heading to work on Thursday were forced to contemplate something inevitable but which no one expected anytime soon: the possibility of a Washington without Sen. John McCain.

McCain, the irascible old living legend. McCain, the Vietnam War hero. McCain, the globe-trotting State Department of one. McCain, the outspoken hawk who championed American troops — and Pentagon spending — and also pilloried the defense contractors he felt let them all down.

In a fitness-crazed land of spin classes and CrossFit gyms, Octavia Zahrt found it can be tough to feel as though you're doing enough. "When I was in school in London, I felt really good about my activity. Then I moved to Stanford, and everyone around me seems to be so active and going to the gym every day," she says. "In the San Francisco Bay Area, it's like 75 percent of people walk around here wearing exercise clothes all day, every day, all the time, and just looking really fit."

A Baltimore man was held in jail for months after police found a stash of drugs — but the officer who found the drugs also seems to be the one who hid them in that spot, according to footage from his body camera. The public defender's office says the man is now free and it is questioning the officer's involvement in 53 active cases.

The officer has been suspended and two of his colleagues are on administrative duty, Baltimore Police Commissioner Kevin Davis said, as the agency's internal affairs unit looks at the case.

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Gigi Douban

If you’re driving around West Jefferson. Ala. looking for a place to eat, you won’t find much. The Alabama Rose, a restaurant that pops up on a phone search, actually burned down a few years ago. But it’s still where 78-year-old Arthur Graves lives.

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07/20/2017: On to the next

Jul 20, 2017
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Marketplace

While the Senate keeps on trying to figure out what it's gonna do about health care, there are plenty of other economic policy problems to deal with. The next big project on the table is tax reform. We take a look at how that debate is shaping up. Also on today's show: What do gold, glitz and lawsuits have in common? The Trump International Hotel. Plus, we talk to Clint Rainey from Bloomberg Businessweek about America’s cheese surplus and the "mad cheese scientists" who are trying to solve it. That's right, cheese scientists. 

 

At a lunch on Wednesday, President Trump tried to persuade some reluctant senators to endorse repealing the Affordable Care Act.

07/20/2017: The line between free speech and propaganda

Jul 20, 2017

In Paris, 25 senior economists and public officials from about two dozen countries recently met behind closed doors to talk about how the world economy is doing. One of them: Diane Swonk from DS Economics. She shared some good news (the rest of the world seems to be doing better) and bad news (these gains have caused negative undercurrents in political elections).  Afterwards, we'll look at how companies are trying to find allow free speech, while blocking propaganda from terrorist organizations like ISIS at the same time.

When Bao Phi's family fled Vietnam in 1975 and settled in Minneapolis with other refugees, he was just a few months old. He was too young to understand the scene at the airport that day: Communist soldiers were firing rockets at planes filled with people trying to escape, incinerating them in the sky. Phi's parent's told him about their family history bit by bit, and he began to form a stronger sense of his own identity.

The cost of repealing — but not replacing — Obamacare

Jul 20, 2017
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Lizzie O'Leary and Eliza Mills

The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has released its calculation of the costs and benefits if Congress repeals the federal health care law, but doesn't replace it. About 32 million people would be uninsured by 2026 and premiums would double. On the other hand, the federal deficit would drop by $473 billion. 

Marketplace's Dan Gorenstein joined us to talk about the possibility of another repeal-and-replace plan in the cards and the future of Medicaid. Below is an edited transcript.

Reality Show Crew Robbed At Gunpoint

Jul 20, 2017

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The Dangers Of Camping

Jul 20, 2017

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Military contractors outnumber soldiers in Afghanistan almost 3-1. They do a lot of the back-office work of warfighting. The question now is whether their role could expand under the Trump administration.

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This is also a moment when President Trump's relationship with members of his own party in Congress is strained, to say the least.

Trump scolded Senate Republicans in a White House meeting yesterday.

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Senator John McCain has brain cancer.

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Meghan McCain writes that, of her family members, the one most confident and calm right now is her father.

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Her father is Senator John McCain. And his office says he was diagnosed with brain cancer.

O.J. Simpson will find out on Thursday if he soon will be released from the Lovelock Correctional Center in Nevada. He has been held there for nearly nine years for convictions on armed robbery and other charges.

The former NFL hero, TV pitchman and movie star, now 70, stands a good chance of being granted parole when he appears before the Nevada Parole Board via video link. No one has registered to testify against him. He will likely try to persuade the board of his good behavior behind bars.

If paroled, Simpson would be released from prison no sooner than Oct. 1.

On a recent morning in Texas, Fort Worth police arrested a man who threatened to burn down his girlfriend's apartment. The officers also detained two Mexican nationals at the apartment complex because they suspected them of being in the country illegally.

Then police called ICE Fugitive Operations. Soon men with guns and dark ballistic vests swarmed the parking lot.

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos spoke to the annual meeting of the American Legislative Exchange Council, or ALEC, on Thursday in Denver, but protests from left-wing activists and teacher groups started Wednesday.

Hundreds marched from the state Capitol in Denver to the Hyatt Regency, the site of the speech, with signs reading: "Dump Betsy DeVos," "Take Devouchers Elsewhere" and "Stop School Privatization!"

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President Trump did not do much to sell the Senate health care bill before its failure. But he gave the sale a shot Wednesday in the White House before cameras and a captive audience of nearly all the Republican senators. His comments were at times confusing, and in some cases, outright incorrect.

It shows the challenge for a president who doesn't dive deeply into policy to sell his agenda.

What opportunities are there for a coal-mining community after its main industry has waned?

In Somerset County in southwestern Pennsylvania, that's not an easy question to answer. For this county of roughly 76,000 residents, renewable energy and health care offer hopes for its future. But first it has to attract qualified workers.

Visa is set to report third-quarter earnings today after market close and all signs are pointing to good news. The company’s investment in digital platforms is contributing to growth. Visa Checkout, for one, has more than 20 million enrolled accounts and other initiatives are expanding globally. But they’re not the only digital pay app in the game. 

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