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Updated at 4:46 p.m. ET

Police in Manchester, England, decided to stop sharing some intelligence with the U.S. after details from their ongoing terrorism investigation were apparently leaked to the American press, the city's mayor told CNN.

3 things you may have missed about Trump's budget

May 25, 2017
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Janet Nguyen

President Trump released his budget proposal this week, a plan that could have long-ranging consequences on the future of the U.S. economy, education system and country's voting preferences. 

With many programs expected to see billions slashed, let's take a closer look at the specific programs that could be negatively impacted and the rationale behind such huge cuts.  

First, what’s going to happen to the debt ceiling?

Trump’s plan calls our economy “broken” and “stagnant,” alerting readers to the country’s $20 trillion debt.

Here's why so much news seems to break late in the day

May 25, 2017
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Adrienne Hill

The early evening on the East Coast has become a pretty dramatic time of day. Phones start pinging with news alerts. Ping. Ping. Twitter goes crazy. Cable-news anchors jump in with breathless breaking news reports.

Even White House aides live in "dread" of 5 o’clock; worried about the latest news dump, reports The New York Times.

Why is that the time of day it seems like big news has been breaking?

Is the craft movement making service jobs hip?

May 25, 2017
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Kai Ryssdal

What makes a job "cool?" That's the question behind Richard Ocejo's book, "Masters of Craft: Old Jobs in the New Urban Economy." Ocejo, an associate professor of sociology at John Jay University and The City University of New York," interviewed bartenders, distillers, barbers and butchers to understand why these folks pursue a craft service career. Ocejo even joined the bandwagon and got a job as an intern butcher at Dickson's Farmstead Meats in New York.

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David Weinberg

In January of next year, California will become the largest state in the country to legalize recreational marijuana. Medicinal marijuana is already legal in the state. Now, some cash-strapped cities in California are hoping to revive their struggling economies by becoming the first to open their doors to the marijuana industry.

Health care groups that represent doctors and patients are warning members of Congress that the House Republicans' plan to overhaul the Affordable Care Act would hurt people who need insurance most.

By heading straight to the homelands of Islam, Judaism and Christianity on his first presidential trip, Donald Trump took a major risk. The possibility of offending his hosts somewhere along the way with an ill-considered tweet or offhand remark loomed large. Saudi Arabia, Israel and the Vatican are places where appearances matter and words must be chosen carefully.

Model Dani Mathers, whose haughty posting of a photo of a naked woman at her gym sparked outrage last summer, will be punished by spending a month removing graffiti in Los Angeles. Mathers pleaded no contest to a charge of invading the 70-year-old woman's privacy.

If the word "aura" is defined as a pervasive atmosphere, then it's a perfect title for this piece by Anna Thorvaldsdottir, who has a knack for creating vivid sonic environments.

05/25/2017: What, me worry?

May 25, 2017
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Marketplace

We've talked a lot about the economic anxiety normal Americans face every day, but today we're casting and eye toward economic anxiety in and about Washington. First, the White House's budget. There are some assumptions that don't quite add up, but today Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin reiterated his confidence that tax cuts, deregulation and trade policy will ratchet up economic growth. But what if it doesn't? Then: Mnuchin and White House budget director Mick Mulvaney both testified on Capitol Hill this week to sound the alarm about the deb limit.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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One of President Trump's boldest, most ambitious proposals on the campaign trail was to build a wall along the Southern border and get Mexico to pay for it. Amid the tumult of Trump's first few months in office, the border wall hasn't gotten as much attention as some other things. But new legislation has been introduced in Congress to help fund it.

It's called the Border Wall Funding Act of 2017, introduced on March 30 by Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Ala.

Updated at 2 p.m. ET

U.S. personnel "could not have predicted" that dozens of Mosul residents would be in a building where ISIS snipers were firing when they authorized a strike on it in March, the Pentagon says in a newly released report. That airstrike in Iraq killed at least 105 civilians.

The report also says the building collapsed after the strike triggered explosives that had been planted by ISIS.

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Jana Kasperkevic

On Wednesday evening, Greg Gianforte, the Republican candidate for Montana’s lone House seat, allegedly “body-slammed” Guardian U.S. political reporter Ben Jacobs and broke his glasses in the process. The altercation took place when Jacobs tried to ask Gianforte for his take on the recently released Congressional Budget Office score of the new health care replacement bill. The exchange was recorded by Jacobs and later released to public by the Guardian.

Let’s do the numbers: the 'Star Wars' empire

May 25, 2017
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Jana Kasperkevic

Happy 40th birthday, "Star Wars"! May the Force be with you.

Disappointment over declining oil prices abound. OPEC had agreed to make production cuts to help with an oil glut, but it seems these policy changes aren't helping — and neither is the U.S. We'll look at how America's own production habits undercuts the cartel's. Afterwards, we'll examine how state insurance markets that get waivers for pre-existing conditions would react to the GOP's new health care bill, and then talk about the stock market's inability to yield the magic it used to.

The Congressional Budget Office has released its report on the health care bill passed in the House of Representatives. It projects an additional 23 million people would be uninsured under that bill. And it also imagines what the insurance market would look like in states that take advantage of one of the bill’s key provisions: waivers from federal rules on pre-existing conditions and essential health benefits. 

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Jason Cisneroz, a community service officer in Houston, is troubled. His job in the nation's fourth largest city is to forge good relations between the police and Hispanic immigrants, a population typically wary of blue uniforms.

"A couple of days ago there was a witness to a burglary of a motor vehicle," he said. "She saw the suspects run to a certain place and with items they stole from a car, but she was afraid to come to police, she was in fear they would ask for her papers."

At 43 years old, Katina Johnson is planning her high school graduation party. It's been about thirty years since she dropped out of middle school when she found out she was pregnant.

Even before then, though, she'd never had a stable education. Her mother was addicted to drugs and moved her around a lot before she died when Johnson was just 12 years old. "That was the last time I even seen the inside of a school," she says.

If you fly into Haines, Alaska, you'll be on a prop plane so small that your pilot will call the roll.

"Melissa." Yup. "Mary." Yes. "Joseph?" Right here.

Just 2,500 people live in Haines — a small town in southeast Alaska surrounded by water. The scenery is incredible, with snowy mountains and lush green forest beyond. The city center is just a few blocks, with several bars, a few restaurants and a beautiful, award-winning library.

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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A tense moment at a campaign rally last night in Montana turned violent. And now a candidate for Congress has been charged with assault, this on the eve of the special election. So Steve, tell us what happened exactly.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Trump Organization appears to be making only a limited effort to live up to President Trump's promise to give the U.S. Treasury all foreign profits from his hotels and resorts, according to documents released in recent days.

Trump made the promise in mid-January as a way to avoid violating the U.S. Constitution's emoluments clause, which prohibits a president from accepting gifts and payments from foreign governments.

Body cameras are spreading fast through American policing, and they're generating an ocean of video. Axon, a company that provides secure cloud storage for police departments, says it has received more than 4 million hours' worth of video uploads from its clients.

The struggle is real for Sears Holdings — the company behind Sears and Kmart. The once-powerful brand warned investors back in March that there was “substantial doubt” about its future. This week, Sears announced it’s pushed back a deadline on a $500 million loan by six months. That’s got Sears vendors even more anxious about a looming bankruptcy.

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