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Economy
5:20 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Dismal Job Growth Nothing New In California

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 6:13 pm

The good news is that unemployment rate in California dropped down to 10.9 percent for the month of April. The bad news is that a million more workers were unemployed in April compared to a pre-recession low in October 2006. The new numbers suggest a lurching recovery without any sustained momentum.

Economy
5:20 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Oil Industry Helps Job Growth Hold Steady In Texas

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 6:13 pm

Texas is one of the states that has actually seen job growth. Nathan Bernier of member station KUT reports on the type of jobs being created.

Economy
5:20 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Part-Time Workers Skew Jobs Figures In Arizona

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 6:13 pm

Arizona is among the top ten states for job growth. But that includes part-time jobs, so thousands may be underemployed.

Law
5:20 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Zimmerman Headed To Jail After Bond Is Revoked

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 6:13 pm

George Zimmerman, the neighborhood watch captain accused of killing an unarmed teen, will now go to jail. A judge revoked Zimmerman's bond on Friday, saying he was dishonest about his assets.

World
5:03 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Struggling U.S. Economy Drags Down The World

Slow economic growth in the U.S. is having an impact on many countries around the world. Here, people walk past a board flashing the Nikkei index on the Tokyo Stock Exchange in Japan last month.
Toru Yamanaka AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 5:38 pm

The sputtering U.S. economy isn't just bad news for America, it's a drag on the global economic outlook as well.

"What matters to the rest of the world is the amount of demand the United States is going to generate," says economist Eswar Prasad, a professor of trade policy at Cornell.

"Weak job growth translates to weak domestic demand in the U.S., and that concerns all of the U.S.'s major trading partners," he says.

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Business
5:03 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

No Beer Goggles For Baseball Stadium Brew Prices

A fan of the St. Louis Cardinals buys a beer from a vendor prior to Game 3 of the World Series against the Detroit Tigers at Busch Stadium in 2006. At 56 cents an ounce, St. Louis is second only to Boston for the priciest ballpark brew in the country.
Jamie Squire Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 6:13 pm

Change has been the story of the season for the Miami Marlins, formerly the Florida Marlins. With a new coach, a new name, new team colors and a new stadium the baseball team set a franchise record for winning games in May.

But one tradition isn't changing anytime soon: beer. Ordering a beer at a baseball game is as American as apple pie. So is forking over a small fortune for that beer.

According to an analysis by TheStreet.com, the most expensive beer of any baseball stadium is sold at the new Marlins Park, where baseball fans pay $8 for a Bud Light draft.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:47 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

As Nations Develop, Cancer Takes Hold

No corner of the world is safe from cancer.
iStockphoto

Cancer is everywhere.

And, before long, cancer will be a major cause of death in every part of the world, not just a big factor in what's now the developed world.

In 2030 the world's population is expected to hit 8.3 billion, up from 7 billion today. By then, new cases of cancer cases are expected to nearly double to 20.3 million from 12.8 million in 2008, according to an analysis in The Lancet Oncology.

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It's All Politics
4:32 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Roberts' Legacy And The Health Care Law

Chief Justice John Roberts
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 5:02 pm

In just a few weeks, a decision is expected from the Supreme Court on the constitutionality of President Obama's health care law. Some legal analysts expect the justices to strike down the law, or at least the controversial individual mandate. And whatever the court decides, it could come in a 5-4 decision.

A few of these analysts discussed the implications of a split decision in this high-profile case with NPR's Neal Conan Thursday on Talk of the Nation.

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Law
4:29 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Edwards Verdict: A Case Of Campaign Law Confusion

Former Sen. John Edwards leaves federal court in Greensboro, N.C., Thursday after jurors acquitted him of one felony count and a judge declared a mistrial on five other charges.
Sara D. Davis Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 10:29 pm

From the day a grand jury indicted former Sen. John Edwards on six felony charges nearly one year ago, the case drew jeers from election lawyers and government watchdogs.

"It was an incredibly aggressive prosecution because it was based on a novel theory of the law," says Melanie Sloan, executive director of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington. "There was literally no precedent. No case had ever been like this."

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Planet Money
4:27 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

How To Kill A Currency

A one-crown note from the Austro-Hungarian empire.
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Mon June 4, 2012 12:25 pm

As the world considers the possible death of the euro, it's worth considering a famous historical example. Ok, it's not that famous. But it's still worth looking at: The break-up of the Austro-Hungarian currency union in 1918.

Just as the countries of Europe today share the euro, the Austrian empire and the Kingdom of Hungary had created a shared currency: the Austro-Hungarian crown.

After World War I, the region broke up. All of a sudden there were lots of countries wanting to switch to their own currencies.

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