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Long and short: women, wages and the workforce

May 19, 2017
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Lizzie O'Leary and Hayley Hershman

The Los Angeles Times' Natalie Kitroeff and The Atlantic's Gillian White play the long and short game this week, focusing on the Congressional Budget Office's forthcoming report on the health care bill and varying definitions of full employment. Plus, Janet Yellen's commencement speech at Brown University provides context for how far women have come in the workplace, and we discuss the recent reversal of this growth.

When John Luther Adams won the Pulitzer Prize for music in 2014 for his undulating orchestral piece Become Ocean, you'd be forgiven for thinking of him as something like the Jacques Cousteau of contemporary classical music.

Burial's been lurking in some subterranean realms lately.

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Updated at 12:30 p.m. ET

Swedish prosecutors have announced they are dropping the country's rape investigation of Julian Assange. The WikiLeaks founder, who has long denied the allegation, has been holed up at the Ecuadorean Embassy in London since 2012 to avoid Sweden's extradition request.

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Milwaukee has the nation's longest-running publicly funded voucher program.

For 27 years it has targeted African-American kids from low-income families, children who otherwise could not afford the tuition at a private or religious school.

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Marielle Segarra

In March, the Department of Homeland Security banned laptops from the cabins of flights coming from 10 airports in the Middle East and North Africa. Now, the agency is reportedly considering expanding the ban to all international flights.

George W. Bush Photo-Bombs A Reporter

May 19, 2017

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Good morning. I'm David Greene. So Fox Sports reporter Emily Jones was just doing her job, talking on camera about a Texas Rangers player, when a baseball fan photo-bombed her, walked by and yelled hey.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

GEORGE W. BUSH: Hey.

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Twenty-five years ago, television audiences watching the final episodes of "Twin Peaks" heard this.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "TWIN PEAKS")

UNIDENTIFIED ACTRESS: (As Laura Palmer, unintelligible).

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Now that a special counsel has been named to lead the investigation into Russian meddling, what does that mean for the other probes happening already on Capitol Hill?

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President Trump will try to leave his troubles behind as he departs on the first foreign trip of his presidency. It's an ambitious itinerary with stops in Saudi Arabia, Israel and the Vatican and two meetings with European leaders.

Here are five objectives to watch for as Trump goes overseas.

1. Will the cloud of controversy follow?

There has been one "bad news" headline after another involving the Trump administration breaking every day this week. But if the president is looking for a reprieve, recent history indicates he might be disappointed.

Remember when President Trump allegedly leaking classified information to the Russians was dominating news coverage?

You'd be forgiven if you only vaguely remembered that, because it was so long ago — Monday, a lifetime in Trump-era news terms.

Take a look at what else happened this week

Monday
"Reports: Trump Gave Classified Info To Russians During White House Visit"

As part of President Trump's executive order to review "job-killing regulations," the Environmental Protection Agency last month asked for the public's input on what to streamline or cut. It held a series of open-mic meetings and set up a website that has received more than 28,000 comments, many of which urge the agency not to roll back environmental protections.

Stocks and bonds have echoed the turbulence in Washington this week. We'll chat with FTN Financial's chief economist, Christopher Low, about why markets took a dip and progress on the GOP's health care bill. Afterwards, we'll examine how Trump's trip to Saudi Arabia could lead to the approval of up to $300 billion in arms sales.

Oh, Code Switch fam: Has there ever been such a week? Because of the virtual smorgasbord of unfortunate news, you may have skipped putting these on your plate. Dig in. Keep a chaser of Pepto handy.

Prepared meal kits have grown into a huge market, now worth an estimated $1.5 billion. It’s been driven by startups, like Blue Apron, Purple Carrot, HelloFresh ... the list goes on. But major supermarkets like Kroger and Publix are now muscling in and testing their own versions.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

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Peggy Lowe

If there was a world series for crazy ballpark food, the Kansas City Royals would be winning.

Kansas City takes two slots on USA Today’s ranking of “10 craziest ballpark foods for the 2017 MLB season”  – more than any other team.

Trade is center stage as President Trump heads to Saudi Arabia

May 19, 2017

President Trump travels to Saudi Arabia today, the first stop on his first foreign trip as president. A number of American CEOs are also tagging along because, it turns out, there are deals to be done in Saudi Arabia.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

 

That whole Panama Papers scandal? The U.S. also needs to take a look at itself

May 19, 2017
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David Brancaccio and Janet Nguyen

The West tends to think highly of itself when it comes to dealing with corruption, but it's an image that's been showing cracks, according to the book "Unmasked: Corruption in the West."

05/19/2017: Corruption in the West

May 19, 2017
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Marketplace

President Trump is traveling to Saudi Arabia today, a trip that'll include a number of American CEOs. The reason they're tagging along: there are deals to be made. On today's show, we'll take a look at the state of trade between the Gulf kingdom and the U.S. Afterwards, we'll explore the meal-kit war between startups like Blue Apron and major supermarkets like Kroger. Plus: Author Laurence Cockcroft explains rising corruption in the West and how the Trump administration is trying to roll back rules aimed at combating the issue.

05/19/2017: Why all the focus on chip-making?

May 19, 2017
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Marketplace

Google and Apple are making their own chips, a move that could have long-ranging effects on smaller chip-focused firms like Nvidia and Imagination Technologies. We'll take a look at why these two tech giants are dipping their toes in this area, and then play this week's Silicon Tally with the Financial Times' San Francisco correspondent Hannah Kuchler. 

The U.S. Treasury Department is freezing the assets of eight members of Venezuela's Supreme Court of Justice as a result of rulings that the U.S. says have usurped the power of that country's democratically elected National Assembly.

The sanctions were announced in a statement by Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin:

President Trump gave a eulogy on Thursday for the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.

"Obamacare is collapsing. It's dead. It's gone," Trump said in a news conference with Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos.

"There's nothing to compare it to because we don't have health care in this country," he went on.

That left some Obamacare customers scratching their heads — figuratively — on Twitter.

At a Senate hearing Thursday, Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, accused Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin of failing to answer his questions about President Trump's business ties to people who might be violating money laundering and other U.S. laws.

Mnuchin responded by suggesting Brown "just send me a note on what you are looking for."

Brown pointed out that he had already sent a two-page letter.

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