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Of 577 key federal jobs requiring Senate confirmation, only 106 have had nominees put forward by President Trump. That's according to the count by the Washington Post and the Partnership for Public Service. Those vacancies include leadership roles at NASA and NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. With no one at the helm, science-based agencies can’t undertake major new research or other initiatives, and lose their effectiveness. But under the current White House administration, new leadership could be more disruptive.

Amazon is everywhere. Even in economic data.

Aug 15, 2017

Today the retail industry got a small piece of good news in the form of some data from July that was better than expected. The government announced this morning that retail sales last month were up 0.6 percent during the previous month and more than 4 percent from this time last year. Not bad for an industry that’s had a lot of hand wringing of late. One of the reasons for the gain? Amazon Prime Day.  

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Many young American surgeons have a strong desire to do humanitarian work overseas. But their good intentions usually don't match up with the skills, such as performing cesarean section deliveries and fixing broken bones, that they'll need in poor countries.

And that means U.S. general surgeons, eager to do charitable work around the globe, may miss out on chances to help some of the world's neediest patients.

More than two weeks after they were first spotted, wildfires on the western coast of Greenland are still burning, worrying local residents and drawing the attention of scientists.

The moments inside a courtroom in Orlando in 2007 were quick and consequential for Marquis McKenzie. The 16-year-old stood handcuffed behind a lectern. A juvenile judge announced his charges, then apologized that he could no longer take up the case.

"You're being direct filed," he told McKenzie, who was accused of armed robbery over a cellphone and a wallet. "You understand what I'm saying? You're being charged as an adult now."

McKenzie remembers his mother wailing from the courtroom benches, begging the judge to reconsider.

Your pumpkin pie is a lie

Aug 15, 2017

Always leave room for dessert, especially when it's served with a little business history on the side. In her new cookbook, "BraveTart: Iconic American Desserts," Serious Eats senior editor Stella Parks tells how some of the most all-American desserts became so popular in this country. A lot of times, it's because a corporation made it happen.

The U.S. International Trade Commission, an independent federal agency, starts hearings Tuesday on whether U.S. solar manufacturers are being hurt by foreign competition. The hearings could lead to tariffs being put in place on all foreign-made panels. Such tariffs could have consequences for the entire solar industry. 

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Pearce Tefft wrote a letter to members of his community in Fargo, N.D., to set the record straight about his family and the current state of his relationship to Peter Tefft, calling his son "an avowed white nationalist" who attended the "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, Va., over the weekend.

Wilco has released a new song against ignorance and violence in the wake of last weekend's unrest in Charlottesville, VA. The track, called "All Lives, You Say?" is a short country shuffle that takes aim at the slogan "All Lives Matter," designed as a counter-protest to the Black Lives Matter movement.

My Economy tells the story of the new economic normal through the eyes of people trying to make it, because we know the only numbers that really matter are the ones in your economy.

Today’s installment is from Dr. Javier Martinez, CEO of Martinez Brands, a wine and spirits wholesaler and importer in Pasadena, California.

Do you ever bring your child to work with you? Do you feel like you have co-workers that do it way too often? Marketplace Weekend is tackling kids at the office in its latest work advice column from Alison Green, from the popular blog, Ask a Manager

08/15/2017: Why would CEOs stick with Trump?

Aug 15, 2017

An infrastructure announcement turned into an off-the-rails press conference this afternoon as President Trump blasted the four (now five) CEOs who have left his manufacturing council. We'll correct the record on some of his criticisms and then zoom out to the bigger question: If you're a CEO tapped for one of these White House advisory roles, why do you stay? Then: Trump has nominated people to fill just 106 of 577 key Senate-confirmed jobs in his administration. NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are both lacking permanent leadership.

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And let's hear the voice now. I have a Republican lawmaker. It's Congressman Tom Cole of the state of Oklahoma who's on the line with us. Congressman, thanks, as always, for joining us. We appreciate it.

TOM COLE: David, thank you.

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08/15/2017: Why would CEOs stick with Trump?

Aug 15, 2017

An infrastructure announcement turned into an off-the-rails press conference this afternoon as President Trump blasted the four (now five) CEOs who have left his manufacturing council. We'll correct the record on some of his criticisms and then zoom out to the bigger question: If you're a CEO tapped for one of these White House advisory roles, why do you stay? Then: Trump has nominated people to fill just 106 of 577 key Senate-confirmed jobs in his administration. NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are both lacking permanent leadership.

Who are the winners and losers of globalization?

Aug 15, 2017

Slow income growth among the middle class of rich countries like the U.S., Japan and Germany is widely attributed to globalization. A lack of upward mobility has been frustrating for many, leading to an increase of political populism on both sides of the spectrum. Former World Bank economist Branko Milanovic has created the “elephant chart,” which answers the question: Who are the winners and losers of globalization?

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un reviewed his military's plans to rain "an enveloping fire" around the U.S. territory of Guam — but opted not to fire missiles at this time, according to state media. Despite the stand-down, some Guamanians were alarmed after two radio stations aired an erroneous emergency alert Tuesday.

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North Korean leader Kim Jong-un has decided not to launch four missiles toward Guam after all, according to state media reports. Is that what's helping to calm markets? MacroPolicy Perspectives Julia Coronado joined us to talk about some of the factors responsible for this stock market rally. Afterwards, we'll discuss the crowded field of premium rewards cards, and then look at why millennials seem to be disinterested in vintage furniture. 

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Good morning, I'm Ailsa Chang with a story about...

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Cheese. We'll go somewhere where there's cheese.

Bank of America plans to launch a new premium rewards credit card next month. The bank is entering a crowded field of similar products from American Express and Chase, whose Sapphire Reserve card made headlines for its initial 100,000-point sign-up bonus and $450 annual fee. As a result, banks are changing the way they try to lure new customers.

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This is just one of the stories from our "I've Always Wondered" series, where we tackle all of your questions about the world of business, no matter how big or small. Ever wondered if recycling is worth it? Or how store brands stack up against name brands? What do you wonder?

American doctors have been noticing an increase in osteoarthritis of the knee. They have suspected two driving forces: more old people and more people who are overweight.

A study published in this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences argues that's far from the whole story. Even correcting for body mass index and age, osteoarthritis of the knee is twice as common now as it was before the 1950s.

The names and faces of individuals who were part of last weekend's white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., are being plastered all over the Internet by civil rights advocates. It's part of an effort to shame the people who participated. But it's a tactic that can also snare some innocent people in its net.

A Bootstrapped British Invasion

Aug 15, 2017

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There are a lot of artists, singers and writers who make us see the world a little bit differently, but not many who inspire a brand new color.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "PURPLE RAIN")

PRINCE: (Singing) Purple rain, purple rain.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The Trump administration on Wednesday will start to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement with Canada and Mexico. And despite very tough talk about NAFTA during the campaign, it appears the administration has backed away from a major assault on the decades-old trade deal.

And that is a relief to businesses in all three countries.

During the presidential campaign, Donald Trump clearly tapped into frustration about workers who had lost jobs in manufacturing. And he painted NAFTA as one of the central villains responsible for stealing Americans jobs.

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