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The Two-Way
7:37 am
Sun April 8, 2012

VIDEO: 'It Gets Better' For Mormon Students Too

A screengrab from the "It Gets Better" video created by gay and lesbian students at Brigham Young University.
YouTube

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The Salt
6:04 am
Sun April 8, 2012

Eggs Become Art To Celebrate Life's Rebirth

Ukrainians have been crafting elaborately decorated eggs for thousands of years.
Konstantin Chernichkin Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:54 am

It all starts with the egg.

In spring, chickens start laying again, bringing a welcome source of protein at winter's end. So it's no surprise that cultures around the world celebrate spring by honoring the egg.

Some traditions are simple, like the red eggs that get baked into Greek Easter breads. Others elevate the egg into an elaborate art, like the heavily jewel-encrusted Faberge eggs that were favored by the Russian czars starting in the 19th century.

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Music News
6:03 am
Sun April 8, 2012

In D.C., A Bastion Of Black Entertainment Returns

Once the home of Washington, D.C.'s "Black Broadway" district, the Howard Theatre is reopening after decades of inactivity.
Tim Cooper

It was 1910. Howard Taft was president, the Boy Scouts of America came into being and in Washington, D.C., the Howard Theatre opened its doors, ushering in a new era of black culture and entertainment.

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Food
6:03 am
Sun April 8, 2012

Spilled Or Not, Cries Remain In Raw Milk Debate

A dairy cow from Eastleigh Farm in Framingham, Mass., grazes near the Statehouse on Boston Common on May 10, 2010. The cow's visit was part of a rally by raw-milk proponents.
Steven Senne AP

Originally published on Sun April 8, 2012 12:28 pm

Weekend Edition food commentator Bonny Wolf is trying to understand if the glass is half-full or half-empty when it comes to arguments for and against raw, unpasteurized milk.

I first drank raw milk two years ago, at a dinner given by a college anthropology class in Maryland. The professor, whose three small children drink only raw milk, had to go to Pennsylvania to get it since it's illegal to sell it in Maryland.

I felt a slight thrill of danger before my first sip because, according to the federal government, drinking raw milk is a very bad idea.

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Asia
6:02 am
Sun April 8, 2012

India's Census: Lots Of Cellphones, Too Few Toilets

A woman talks on her cellphone in a slum area of Bhopal last month.
Sanjeev Gupta EPA /Landov

Originally published on Sun April 8, 2012 5:56 pm

India's once-a-decade census has turned up some striking numbers: The population grew this past decade by 181 million — that's the total population of Brazil. India now has more than 1.2 billion people and is on track to overtake China as the world's most populous nation in 2030.

India's rapid economic growth — and its long-standing poverty — are also reflected in the census. More than half of all Indian households now have cellphones, but fewer than half have toilets.

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Home Front: Soldiers Learn To Live After War
6:01 am
Sun April 8, 2012

Dismissed: Military Families Reunite, Face The Future

A portrait of Spc. Jonathan Nestico, 27, is displayed in his family's home in Woburn, Mass.
Becky Lettenberger Becky Lettenberger/NPR

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:53 am

Back from a yearlong deployment to Afghanistan, the 182nd Infantry Regiment of the Army National Guard had to make a pit stop before heading home. At Camp Atterbury in Indiana, the service members were far from their families, most of which are in Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

The returning soldiers had to go through a series of checkups and assessments before their welcome-home ceremony, which marks the moment they return to civilian life and the people they left behind.

Before they got there, there was anxiety on both sides — for soldiers and their families.

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Sunday Puzzle
12:01 am
Sun April 8, 2012

A Mix-Up At The Music Fest

On-Air Challenge: Every answer is the name of a popular music group, past or present. You'll be given clues in which two letters in the group's name have been changed. For example, given "The Bench Boss," the answer would be "The Beach Boys," after changing the N in "Bench" to an A and the first S of "Boss" to a Y.

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Around the Nation
5:22 pm
Sat April 7, 2012

Is Death Row Still Death Row If Repeal Passes?

Religious leaders stop to pray as they march to the state Capitol for a rally to support repealing the death penalty, in Hartford, Conn., on Tuesday. The state Senate passed a bill abolishing capital punishment Thursday.
Jessica Hill AP

Following a vote this week in the state Senate, it's all but certain that Connecticut will become the next state to abolish the death penalty. But residents are divided over what a repeal will mean for those currently on death row.

State Sen. Edward Meyer stressed that the bill — which makes life in prison without parole the maximum sentence — was not retroactive.

"It doesn't affect the 11 inmates that are on death row right now," he said.

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Environment
4:12 pm
Sat April 7, 2012

Sunny Days Are Here Again — But Is That Good?

A couple enjoy a sunny afternoon against the backdrop of the Midtown skyline from Piedmont Park in Atlanta in late March.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Sat April 7, 2012 7:41 pm

Across the country, more than 7,700 daily temperature records were broken last month, on the heels of the fourth warmest winter on record.

While it might be time to lie on a blanket in the park, climate scientists are worried. They say all these sunny days are actually an extreme weather event, one with local and global implications.

In Iowa, March was so hot — a record-breaking 84 degrees — that some crops there, like oats, are now running way ahead of schedule.

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Music Interviews
4:00 pm
Sat April 7, 2012

Simone Felice: The Solemn Sound Of A Brush With Death

Simone Felice wrote the songs on his new self-titled album while recovering from emergency open-heart surgery.
Courtesy of the artist

Simone (pronounced "Simon") Felice is a poet, a novelist and a musician from rural New York state who has lived through two near-death experiences. At 12, he suffered a brain aneurysm, and in June 2010, he underwent emergency open-heart surgery. He jokes, "I guess I came out of the factory a little defective."

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