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Health Care
2:30 pm
Mon July 2, 2012

The Takeaway From The Health Care Ruling

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 3:45 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. And topic A in this city remains the Supreme Court decision on health care handed down on Thursday. President Obama claims validation of his signature legislative achievement. Republicans, including presidential candidate Mitt Romney, vow to repeal it.

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Africa
2:27 pm
Mon July 2, 2012

Africa's Ongoing Militant Conflicts And Ethnic Feuds

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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Books
2:06 pm
Mon July 2, 2012

The Internal Politics At War In 'Little America'

In Little America, Washington Post correspondent Rajiv Chandrasekaran details the difficulties that followed the 2009 troop surge in Afghanistan.
Patrick Baz/AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 12:11 pm

On assignment in southern Afghanistan in 2009, Washington Post correspondent Rajiv Chandrasekaran waded through chest-high water with U.S. Marines, through canals originally dug by Americans 60 years ago. There, he discovered a massive Cold War project to transform the Helmand River Valley through electrification and modern agriculture in an area once known as "Little America."

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Deceptive Cadence
1:57 pm
Mon July 2, 2012

Summer Souvenirs: 75 Years Of Tanglewood In Pictures

Seiji Ozawa and Arthur Fielder, aboard a train during Tanglewood on Parade, 1975.
Heinz Weissenstein/Whitestone Photo courtesy of the Boston Symphony Orchestra

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 3:34 pm

Join us Friday as we celebrate the 75th anniversary of Tanglewood, the summer music festival that is both the seasonal home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and a legendary destination in its own right.

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The Two-Way
1:49 pm
Mon July 2, 2012

European Giant Airbus Set To Open First American Plant In Alabama

Airbus President & CEO Fabrice Bregier, second from left, shakes hands with Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley as they pose with a model of the A320 Airbus.
Dave Martin AP

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 3:51 pm

Airbus, the European aviation giant, announced that it was opening its first assembly plant in the United States.

The AP reports this is a significant and symbolic step in its rivalry with the American Boeing.

The AP adds:

"The French-based company said the Alabama plant is expected to cost $600 million to build and will employ 1,000 people when it reaches full production, likely to be four planes a month by 2017.

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The Two-Way
1:31 pm
Mon July 2, 2012

Gatorade And Cheetos: Blackout In Small-Town West Virginia

Members of the Williamsburg Volunteer Fire Department were unable to find fuel at a station in Crawley, W.Va. Elsewhere, people waited in line for hours for the chance to fill up.
Alan Greenblatt NPR

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 3:28 pm

People who show up at the Shell station in Crawley, W.Va., hoping to find ice, water or a working bathroom are out of luck. With no power to work the pumps, there's no hope of buying gas, either.

Still, a steady stream of customers arrived at the station Sunday evening, picking up snack cakes and 12-packs of Bud Light. A couple of women left the food store with little kids in tow holding Gatorade and Cheetos, which seems like a suitable supper when the food in your home freezer has started to go bad.

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Shots - Health Blog
12:59 pm
Mon July 2, 2012

Glaxo To Plead Guilty To 3 Charges In Sweeping Health Settlement

GlaxoSmithKline's mishandling of information on safety problems with diabetes drug Avandia is just one of the violations cited in a settlement with the government.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:15 am

If you've grown numb to the federal fraud charges settled by drugmakers one after another, shake it off and take note of today's huge settlement by GlaxoSmithKline.

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The Two-Way
12:56 pm
Mon July 2, 2012

CBS News: Roberts Switched His Vote On Health Care

The U.S. Supreme Court justices (first row, from left) Clarence Thomas, Antonin Scalia, Chief Justice John Roberts, Anthony Kennedy, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, (back row) Sonia Sotomayor, Stephen Breyer, Samuel Alito and Elena Kagan.
Supreme Court

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 2:55 pm

It was much rumored as soon as the 5-4 decision that upheld President Obama's signature health care law was announced.

Chief Justice John Roberts had sided with the liberal wing of the court and he had done so after initially voting in favor of striking down the individual mandate, the part of the law the required every American to obtain health care.

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Judging The Health Care Law
12:39 pm
Mon July 2, 2012

Assessing The Supreme Court's Recent Term

The U.S. Supreme Court justices (first row, from left) Clarence Thomas, Antonin Scalia, Chief Justice John Roberts, Anthony Kennedy, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, (back row) Sonia Sotomayor, Stephen Breyer, Samuel Alito and Elena Kagan — pose at the Supreme Court in 2010.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 2:43 pm

An eventful term of the U.S. Supreme Court ended Thursday with the landmark 5-4 ruling affirming the legality of the Affordable Care Act. Much attention has focused on the pivotal role of Chief Justice John Roberts in the case — and whether some elements of his opinion in the health care ruling will have a conservative influence on future cases.

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Book Reviews
12:16 pm
Mon July 2, 2012

'The Age Of Miracles' Considers Earth's Fragility

iStock

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 12:39 pm

The Age of Miracles is literary fiction, but it spins out the same kind of "what if?" disaster plot that distinguishes many a classic sci-fi movie. Too bad the title The Day the Earth Stood Still was already taken, because it really would have been the perfect title for Thompson's novel.

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