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Shots - Health Blog
4:03 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

State Legislatures Stay Busy On Abortion Laws

Virginia Senate Republican Leader Thomas Norment, of James City, (left), and State Sen. Stephen Newman, of Lynchburg, listen to a Feb. debate on a bill requiring an ultrasound before an abortion. The bill was later amended to remove a requirement for transvaginal ultrasound.
Steve Helber AP

2011 was a banner year for state laws restricting abortion. And 2012 looks like runner-up.

That's the central finding of the midyear report from the Guttmacher Institute, the reproductive policy research group that keeps track of such things.

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A Blog Supreme
3:55 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Back Home With Canada's Greatest Living Jazz Musician

Oliver Jones.
Michael Slobodian

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:15 pm

A week ago, Oliver Jones — the greatest living jazz musician in Canada — played his hometown Montreal International Jazz Festival, one of the world's largest. "Oliver Jones Plays Oliver Jones," read the bill. It was the first time, he said in a conversation earlier last week, that the pianist, now 77, would be playing strictly his own tunes for an entire set.

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It's All Politics
3:53 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Biden Says It, So Obama Doesn't Have To

Vice President Biden addresses the NAACP annual convention Thursday in Houston.
Pat Sullivan AP

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 4:31 pm

President Obama may have disappointed the NAACP by appearing only via brief video message Thursday at the civil rights group's annual gathering — especially after Mitt Romney had personally taken the stage a day earlier.

But sending in Vice President Biden to stir things up, just 24 hours after Romney was booed while delivering a conservative message meant to resonate beyond the walls of the Houston convention center, seemed to work out just fine for Obama.

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The Two-Way
3:53 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Nike Announces They Will Take Paterno's Name Off Child Care Center

Former Penn State Coach Joe Paterno stands with his players in 2009.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 4:45 pm

The fallout from the independent report on how Penn State handled the sexual abuse allegations by Jerry Sandusky has begun.

Nike has announced that it has removed the name of former Penn State football coach Joe Paterno from its child care center in Oregon. Mark Parker, Nike's president and CEO, said he was "deeply saddened" by the results of the investigation.

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It's All Politics
3:46 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Three Crucial Years Propel Romney's Business Career Back To Center Stage

Thomas Monaghan (left), founder and chairman of Domino's Pizza, signs an agreement to sell a "significant portion" of his stake in the company to Mitt Romney's Bain Capital, in 1998. Romney, then Bain's CEO, maintains that he left the firm the following year.
Scott Gries AP

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 4:00 pm

Three years might not seem like a big deal when looking back over Mitt Romney's two-decade career with Bain Capital.

But a growing number of journalists — and the Obama campaign — think it is.

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The Two-Way
2:58 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Wells Fargo Agrees To $175 Million Settlement Over Lending Discrimination

Wells Fargo has denied claims of lending discrimination and said it's settling "solely for the purpose of avoiding contested litigation with" the Justice Department
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Wells Fargo Bank agreed to pay at least $175 million Thursday to resolve allegations it discriminated against black and Latino home buyers, in what the Justice Department called the second largest settlement over fair lending violations.

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The Picture Show
2:50 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Detroit Lost And Found: Vintage Photos Speak Volumes

These photos from the 1960s-1990s were found by two Italian photographers while working in Detroit.
Cesuralab

In 2009, Italian photographers Arianna Arcara and Luca Santese were on assignment in Detroit to document the U.S. economic crisis. While wandering around the city, they kept coming across old photos. They gathered about 1,500 over the course of two trips and, writes Arcara via email, "we fell in love."

"We thought we could do a better job working on this material that was actually taken from the people that lived in that town ... instead of taking pictures of the aftermath of the crisis."

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Planet Money
2:50 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

How To Define Your Terms In 300 Pages

Mary Schapiro, chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, and Gary Gensler, chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, before a June congressional hearing. Both agencies adopted hundreds of pages of rules this week.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 4:09 pm

In Tuesday's show, economist Luigi Zingales warned that massive, overly complicated laws and regulations go a long way toward undermining public trust in the government. They leave only lobbyists and lawyers reading the rules, in the pursuit of loopholes.

By coincidence, on Tuesday a key federal financial regulator said it had approved a collection of definitions and conditions for regulating a big chunk of the derivatives market.

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The Two-Way
2:48 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

No Reason To Get Excited, Dylan Says: PBS Has The Wrong Guitar

Bob Dylan in April 1965, just as he was going electric.
Harry Thompson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 4:48 pm

The sleuths at PBS' History Detectives show think they've had their hands on the guitar Bob Dylan played when he famously (or infamously?) "went electric" at the Newport Folk Festival in 1965.

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The Two-Way
2:40 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Saudi Arabia Will Send Two Women To The Olympics

In this May photo, members of a Saudi female soccer team listen to their captain, Rawh Abdullah, before their training session at a secret location in Riyadh. The decision to send female athletes to the Olympics will definitely have consequences at home.
Hassan Ammar AP

Under international pressure, Saudi Arabia has decided to send two women to the Olympics in London.

That means that for the first time ever, the Olympic games will include women from every competing country. NPR's Howard Berkes filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"Saudi Arabia now joins Qatar and Brunei as the last countries to enter women into Olympic competition. Seven athletes once banned because of their gender will compete in judo, track, swimming, table tennis and shooting events when the London Olympics begin later this month.

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