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Presidential Race
2:26 am
Sun July 15, 2012

Green Party Pick Gives Democrats Brunt Of Criticism

Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein delivers her acceptance speech at the party's convention in Baltimore on Saturday.
Laura-Chase McGehee AP

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 11:11 am

The Green Party nominated a Massachusetts physician and a formerly homeless single mother as their presidential and vice-presidential candidates for 2012 on Saturday. They say they are in it to win it, and — at the very least — to expand the electoral conversation to include people they say aren't represented by either Democrats or Republicans.

Amid waving green and white campaign signs in a conference room at a Baltimore Holiday Inn, the room erupted in cheers as Dr. Jill Stein won the delegate count.

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Europe
12:58 am
Sun July 15, 2012

Running With The Bulls, But The Fear Is Financial

Summertime is Spain's festival season. Villages across the country will honor their patron saints with more wild parties. But come September, a hangover just might be waiting.
Jasper Juinen Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 5:07 pm

As a journalist, I came to Pamplona to see if Spain's dismal economy would dampen the spirit of the country's biggest summertime festival, the running of the bulls. Spaniards take their partying very seriously, and if there were even a hint of melancholy in their chants of "Viva San Fermin!" it might mean the economy devils had won.

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Monkey See
12:03 am
Sun July 15, 2012

The Id, The Ego And The Superhero: What Makes Batman Tick?

Christian Bale as Batman in The Dark Knight Rises.
Ron Phillips Warner Brothers Pictures

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 11:11 am

When you look at Batman with a coldly analytical eye — and he's hard to avoid these days, with The Dark Knight Rises set to come out Friday — a few things stand out as potential red flags: the secrecy, the lair, the attraction to danger, the blithe self-sacrifice, the ... cape.

It's unusual, all of it, you have to admit. Sure, he's handy to have around in an emergency, and you can't beat a fella who can be summoned with a giant light in the sky in the event you've got no cellphone reception.

But is he entirely ... well?

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Sunday Puzzle
12:03 am
Sun July 15, 2012

Following The Trail

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 11:11 am

On-Air Challenge: For each category, name something in the category starting with each of the letters in the word "trail." For example, if the category were "books of the Bible," you might say Timothy, Ruth, Amos, Isaiah and Leviticus.

Any answer that works is correct. And you can give the answers in any order.

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Economy
5:52 pm
Sat July 14, 2012

A Tale Of Two Cities: Too Many Jobs, Or Not Enough

Agriculture is a key job sector in Yuma, Ariz., where the seasonal workforce and migrant labor tend to boost the unemployment rate.
Jacob Lopez AP

Originally published on Sat July 14, 2012 6:12 pm

Maria Arvizu continues to fill out job applications even though she has yet to deposit her last paycheck.

Arvizu, 53, relocated to Yuma, Ariz., to become a bus driver for the local school district last year. After school closed for summer break, she was caught off guard when she was laid off. She had expected to get another driving assignment and was denied collecting unemployment because she was still considered a school employee.

"I just keep looking for a job," Arvizu says.

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Energy
5:20 pm
Sat July 14, 2012

Miners Weather The Slow Burn Of Coal's Demise

Equipment for transporting and housing coal sits idle in Cowen, W.Va. Since the natural gas boom, several mines in Webster County have either slowed or shut down operation, laying off hundreds of workers.
Guy Raz NPR

Originally published on Sat July 14, 2012 8:21 pm

At some point today, you will probably flip on a light switch. That simple action connects you to the oldest and most plentiful source of American electricity: coal.

Since the early 1880s — when Edison and Tesla pioneered the distribution of electrical power into our homes — most of that power has come from the process of burning coal.

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Shots - Health Blog
5:12 pm
Sat July 14, 2012

Pennsylvania Cuts Medicaid Coverage For Dental Care

Marcia Esters hopes charity will pay for dental work that Medicaid used to cover.
Erika Beras

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 7:41 am

Marcia Esters needs crowns fused to six of her bottom teeth and new dentures. But because of changes made to Medicaid in Pennsylvania, she now has to pay for it all herself.

"It's thousands of dollars' worth of work that I cannot afford," she says.

Esters also uses a wheelchair. Because she couldn't get get her teeth fixed, she has spent the last few months eating pureed food and avoiding people.

"I don't go anywhere unless I have to," she says. "If you could look or feel halfway decent, it just helps, it really does."

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Around the Nation
5:12 pm
Sat July 14, 2012

Two Governors, Two Approaches To Solvency

Originally published on Sat July 14, 2012 7:21 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

This weekend, governors from around the country are convening in Williamsburg, Virginia, for their annual meeting. The convention is happening at a time when most states are struggling to balance budgets and close deficits. In many cases, that's meant cutbacks.

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Around the Nation
5:12 pm
Sat July 14, 2012

Challenges Ahead For Oregon's Health Exchanges

Originally published on Sat July 14, 2012 7:21 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

And if you're just joining us, this is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

As Governor Deal just mentioned, Georgia is still undecided over whether it will participate in Medicaid expansion. That's part of the Affordable Care Act.

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Author Interviews
4:31 pm
Sat July 14, 2012

'Sunny Chernobyl': Beauty In A Haze Of Pollution

Garbage litters the banks of India's holy Yamuna River on World Water Day 2010. For decades, the Yamuna has been dying a slow death from pollution. According to Blackwell, even its most ardent defenders refer to it as a "sewage drain."
Manan Vatsyayana AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 4:04 am

In some of the dirtiest places on Earth, author and environmentalist Andrew Blackwell found some beauty. His book, Visit Sunny Chernobyl, tours the deforestation of the Amazon, the oil sand mines in Canada and the world's most polluted city, located in China.

Blackwell says his ode to polluted locales is a bid for re-engagement with places people have shrunk away from in disgust.

Radioactive To Its Core

His first stop was the site of the world's worst nuclear disaster, Chernobyl.

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