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Business
4:33 pm
Mon July 2, 2012

As Strikes Wane, Caterpillar Workers Hold The Line

Striking workers picket outside a Caterpillar plant in Joliet, Ill. The work stoppage is now entering its third month.
Joseph P. Meier Sun-Times Media Photo

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 6:35 pm

Whenever a car or truck turns off busy Channahon Road onto the long drive to the Caterpillar plant in Joliet, Ill., a handful of union workers on a picket line scream, "Scab! Scab!!"

As strikers try shaming the few workers and managers who cross the line, even a clearly marked sandwich delivery car gets shouted down.

Approximately 800 workers at this plant, which makes hydraulic systems for Caterpillar's heavy construction and mining equipment, are about to enter their third month on strike.

Negotiations Fail

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Music News
4:33 pm
Mon July 2, 2012

The Olympics Of Choral Music Come To Cincinnati

South Africa's Kearsney College Choir is one of 360 groups that will be competing at the 2012 World Choir Games in Cincinnati.
World Choir Games

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 10:11 am

This summer, while athletes prepare for the Olympic Games in London, music lovers are getting ready for the "Olympics of Choral Music." Officially called the World Choir Games, this Herculean singing competition features hundreds of choirs from around the world. This year is the first time it will be held in the U.S. — in Cincinnati, starting Wednesday.

Catherine Roma, conductor of women's choir MUSE, says her philosophy is more about musical excellence than competition. After witnessing the 2010 Choral Olympics in China, she saw something that surprised her.

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The Two-Way
4:33 pm
Mon July 2, 2012

Phelps Will Not Try For 8 Medals This Year

Michael Phelps reacts after winning the men's 200m Butterfly semifinal on day six of the 2012 U.S. Olympic Team Trials on Saturday.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 4:44 pm

Michael Phelps, the American Olympic swimming star, will not try to repeat his incredible feat of Beijing. Phelps collected eight gold medals in 2008, which essentially cemented his place as the the best swimmer the world has seen.

The New York Times reports that Phelp's coach, Bob Bowman, announced today that Phelps will not compete in the 200-meter freestyle in London, which reduces his event load to seven.

The Times adds:

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Economy
4:33 pm
Mon July 2, 2012

Factories Scaling Back Amid Economic Slide

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 6:35 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

In what could be a troubling sign for the U.S. economy, manufacturing activity started contracting last month. U.S. manufacturing has been a much-needed bright spot, with companies adding jobs and selling more products.

But today, as NPR's Chris Arnold tells us, we got evidence that things might be changing.

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Deceptive Cadence
4:17 pm
Mon July 2, 2012

Copland's 'Lincoln Portrait': Honest Abe's Oratory, Tailored For Orchestra

Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 26, 2012 12:39 pm

Brooklyn-born Aaron Copland was an American original in more ways than one. It's not just his music, with its openness and simple elegance. It's that he expected ballet dancers to act like cowboys, pianists to play blues and orchestra players to accompany political speechmaking. His Lincoln Portrait, composed during World War II, matches words from our 16th president with symphonic music.

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NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
3:58 pm
Mon July 2, 2012

Do You Live In A City? Hm. Let's Find Out

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 11:37 am

Urban life is multifaceted and complex. But, sometimes you need to just go with the flow and this chart may (or may not) show you if you're really an urbanite.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
3:58 pm
Mon July 2, 2012

At Work And At Play, How Cities Stack Up

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 4:50 pm

There is increasing awareness of cities as a defining trait of humanity and their importance to our health, economy and the environment. Here, some basic nuts and bolts about cities and the people who live, drive, work and play in them

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sports
3:36 pm
Mon July 2, 2012

1500 Meters US Champion On Humble Beginnings

Leonel Manzano leads Matthew Centrowitz to the finish in the men's 1500 meter final at the U.S. Olympic Track and Field Trials Sunday, July 1, 2012, in Eugene, Ore. Manzano came in first and Centrowitz crossed second. Both made the Olympic team. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 3:54 pm

Leonel Manzano is the new U.S. track and field champion in the men's 1500 meters. He took home the title on Sunday night, and booked his place on the 2012 U.S. Olympic team. As part of Tell Me More's preview of the Summer Olympics, host Michel Martin speaks with Manzano about his humble beginnings in Mexico.

It's All Politics
3:35 pm
Mon July 2, 2012

Romney Adviser Seems To Undercut GOP Health Care Tax Argument

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 11:35 am

There apparently isn't a unified Republican message on whether President Obama has introduced a big new tax through the Affordable Care Act.

Eric Fehrnstrom, a top aide to Mitt Romney, said Monday that the Republican presidential candidate's position is that the penalty under the new law — the one for people who can afford to buy health insurance, but don't — is not a tax.

The Supreme Court last week upheld the health care law's individual mandate on the grounds that it is a permissible tax, in a 5-4 opinion authored by Chief Justice John Roberts.

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Afghanistan
3:12 pm
Mon July 2, 2012

Lack Of Electricity Dims Afghan Economic Prospects

Afghanistan produces about half the power it currently uses and imports the other half from neighboring countries. But that total still doesn't meet the country's demands. This photo shows Kabul at night in January.
Jawad Jalali EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 5:38 pm

Afghanistan desperately needs to jump-start its economy if it hopes to stand on its own after NATO's drawdown in 2014. But there's a major constraint for a country trying to build a modern economy: electricity shortages.

Afghanistan ranks among the countries with the lowest electricity production per capita in the world. Despite billions of dollars in projects over the past decade, at best one-third of the population has access to regular power.

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