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7:22 am
Sun July 15, 2012

Bob Dylan's Famous Electric Guitar: Lost But Found?

Originally published on Tue July 17, 2012 2:41 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The year was 1965. The place: Newport, Rhode Island. A young Bob Dylan took the stage at the Newport Folk Festival; a harmonica around his neck, and a guitar over his shoulder. But this time, something new - a wailing Stratocaster guitar. In 1965, folk music was acoustic music, period. And the crowd? Not happy that Bobby was plugged in.

(SOUNDBITE OF BOOING)

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Middle East
7:22 am
Sun July 15, 2012

U.N. Tries To Reconcile Accounts Of Killings In Syria

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 11:11 am

U.N. investigators visited the site of a mass killing in Syria. Their initial report cites a targeted attack on the village of Tremseh, but have been unable to confirm the death toll. The Syrian government says it was an anti-terrorist operation and no civilians were killed. Guest host David Greene talks to NPR's Deborah Amos.

Europe
7:22 am
Sun July 15, 2012

Babushkas Sing For The Good Of Their Village

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 11:11 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And let's travel to a different part of Russia now.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

BABUSHKAS OF BURANOVA: (Singing in Russian)

GREENE: These are the Babushkas of Buranova.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

BURANOVA: (Singing in Russian)

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Europe
7:22 am
Sun July 15, 2012

German Town Separates Parking Spots By Gender

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 11:11 am

A small town in southwest German has designated two parking spaces, "men only." They're two of the town's trickiest places to park. The mayor's response, guest host David Greene reports, is that it will attract tourists.

Middle East
7:22 am
Sun July 15, 2012

In Egypt, Clinton Promotes Dialogue With Military

Originally published on Sun July 22, 2012 9:41 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton heads for Israel today; this, after leaving Egypt, where she met with that country's new Islamist president and also, the head of the powerful military council. Secretary Clinton said Egypt needs to continue its transition to a civilian-led democracy. But that message was delivered gently, a sign that Washington sees a long and uncertain transition ahead. NPR's Peter Kenyon has more from Cairo.

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Asia
7:22 am
Sun July 15, 2012

Slowed Growth Reflects China's Uphill Battle

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 11:11 am

No country has enjoyed more spectacular growth in recent decades than China. But the economy that will one day replace America's as the world's largest also faces a lot of challenges. Guest host David Greene talks to NPR's Frank Langfitt, who was a reporter in China in the '90s and returned to Shanghai for NPR last year.

Europe
7:00 am
Sun July 15, 2012

Public Crisis Makes Athens A Tough Draw For Tourists

Graffiti coats a statue near the National Archaeological Museum in Athens. The street is often filled with drug users at night.
Joanna Kakissis NPR

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 11:21 am

The Greek capital of Athens has suffered from an image problem since the debt crisis began more than two years ago. Media reports often show masked gangs throwing petrol bombs at Parliament or riot police dousing demonstrators with tear gas.

Many tourists are staying away as a result. Tourist arrivals to the city are down by between 20 and 40 percent, industry representatives say.

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Theater
6:30 am
Sun July 15, 2012

Intiman Theater Returns For A Shrunken Second Act

Miracle!, a drag version of the Helen Keller drama The Miracle Worker created and directed by Dan Savage, is a highlight of the Intiman Theater's comeback summer festival in Seattle.
Chris Bennion Intiman Theater

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 11:11 am

Forty years ago, the founders of Seattle's Intiman Theater envisioned a company devoted to Western classics: Shakespeare, Chekhov, Ibsen and the like. But over the decades, Intiman also earned national recognition as an incubator of new work.

In 1991, it premiered The Kentucky Cycle, which went on to win a Pulitzer Prize. A decade later, it produced the first workshops of the Tony Award-winning musical The Light in the Piazza.

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Music Interviews
6:25 am
Sun July 15, 2012

Souad Massi: Carrying The Sound Of Algeria On Her Back

Souad Massi performs earlier this month at the Montreal International Jazz Festival.
Frederique Menard-Aubin Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun July 15, 2012 11:11 am

Algerian singer and guitarist Souad Massi paid a visit to the U.S. recently, touring to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Algeria's independence. While in D.C., she stopped by NPR's headquarters to play a Tiny Desk Concert.

After the show, she came downstairs to chat with Weekend Edition Sunday, carrying a guitar on her back. Massi says she's never without one and doesn't really care if it's an acoustic or electric.

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Books News & Features
6:12 am
Sun July 15, 2012

In 'Red Chamber,' A Love Triangle For The Ages

The romance between star-crossed lovers Jia Baoyu (left) and Lin Daiyu, depicted here in a relief panel, meets a tragic end in the classic Chinese novel Dream of the Red Chamber.
IvanWalsh.com Flickr

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 2:48 pm

Before most readers in China learned of Romeo and Juliet, they were captivated by a love triangle between a boy and his two female cousins.

It's the "single most famous love triangle in Chinese literary history," says author Pauline A. Chen, who's written the latest retelling of the tale of Jia Baoyu and his cousins Lin Daiyu and Xue Baochai. The three characters form the central love story of the Chinese novel Hong Lou Meng, often translated as Dream of the Red Chamber in English.

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