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Education
7:45 am
Tue July 31, 2012

Senate Panel Gives For-Profit Colleges An 'F'

Renee Montagne talks with Democratic Sen. Tom Harkin of Iowa about what can be done to regulate for-profit colleges' alleged abusive recruitment policies and high dropout rates. Harkin heads the committee that conducted a two-year investigation into the colleges — and issued a scathing report Monday.

World
7:45 am
Tue July 31, 2012

How U.S.-Iran Tensions Are Tied To Afghanistan

To the United States, Iran is a pariah state. To Afghanistan, Iran is a powerful neighbor that could help promote development and stability, and that puts U.S. foreign policy in conflict. On one hand, Washington is looking for every opportunity to contain Tehran. But, if Iran chooses to help achieve the American goal of peace and stability in Afghanistan, the U.S. might have to turn a blind eye.

Election 2012
7:45 am
Tue July 31, 2012

Controversy Followed Romney On Overseas Trip

Originally published on Sun August 5, 2012 2:02 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

Republican presidential candidate, Mitt Romney, wrapped up a week-long foreign trip today, with a speech in Warsaw, Poland. His trip overseas, which began in London and then on to Jerusalem, was designed to bolster Romney's foreign policy credentials, but instead it's been riddled with gaffs and controversy.

Joining us now from Warsaw, is NPR's Eric Westervelt. Good morning.

ERIC WESTERVELT, BYLINE: Good morning, Renee.

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The Two-Way
7:36 am
Tue July 31, 2012

Massive Failure: 600 Million In India Lose Power; Grid Collapses For Second Day

Passengers waited for trains Tuesday at a railway station in New Delhi. Another grid failure cut power, causing chaos.
Raveendran AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 31, 2012 2:38 pm

At day's end in India, after what's been called the "world's biggest blackout" ever, officials were reporting that electric service had been restored to most of the 670 million or so people who lost it on Tuesday.

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U.S.
7:19 am
Tue July 31, 2012

N.J. Mom Puts Kids To Bed With Math

Originally published on Wed August 1, 2012 4:55 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Ask a lot of people and they'll tell you math is not their strong suit. In an international student assessment program in 2009, the United States was ranked 25th in math proficiency. A parent in New Jersey wants to help change that, beginning with a new nightly ritual, as Ashley Milne-Tyte reports.

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Election 2012
7:19 am
Tue July 31, 2012

Presidential Race Zeroes In On Nevada

Originally published on Tue July 31, 2012 7:45 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

Nevada has just six electoral votes, but it's a state that's much fought over in presidential elections. In 2008, Nevada gave an unexpectedly big boost to Democratic candidate Barack Obama. He carried the state by more than 12 points, thanks to unions and the Hispanic vote.

This year, the contest is shaping up to be much closer, as Nevada copes with both the worst unemployment in the nation and one of the country's highest home foreclosure rates.

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Election 2012
7:19 am
Tue July 31, 2012

NRA Targets One Of Its Own In Tenn. Race

Originally published on Tue July 31, 2012 7:45 am

On Thursday, voters in Tennessee will decide on a series of ballot issues, including an unusual one that's garnering a lot of attention. The National Rifle Association has turned against one of its biggest supporters and is actively trying to get the Republican booted from office.

NPR Story
7:19 am
Tue July 31, 2012

Punk Band's Case Tests Putin's Tolerance For Dissent

Originally published on Tue July 31, 2012 7:52 am

Three women charged with blasphemy went on trial Monday in Russia in a case that's being seen as a major test of President Vladimir Putin's tolerance for dissent. The women are members of the band Pussy Riot. They were arrested after staging a punk rock protest at the altar of a Moscow cathedral.

Dead Stop
5:07 am
Tue July 31, 2012

Rediscovered Headstones Hold Clues To Earthquake

The Gilliam Cemetery, near Sebastopol, Calif., received its first grave in 1852. Many of its older headstones have disappeared over the years.
Cindy Carpien NPR

Originally published on Tue July 31, 2012 8:55 am

The Gilliam Cemetery, which lies 60 miles north of San Francisco, appears to be gaining residents lately. But it's not only because new people have been interred there. Instead, headstones that wound up being buried a century ago have been found and resurrected.

The cemetery's story begins in 1850, when a wagon train of pioneers left Missouri and settled near what is now Sebastopol, Calif. The Gilliam Cemetery was started in 1852, when Polly Gilliam Sullivan and her husband, Isaac, needed a place to bury their stillborn son.

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Crisis In The Housing Market
5:07 am
Tue July 31, 2012

Is Housing Recovery Real? Not Everyone Is Convinced

A construction worker carries lumber while working on new homes in San Mateo, Calif., in March. Homebuilding is at its highest level in nearly four years.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 31, 2012 5:08 pm

Housing, the sector that led us into the recession, now looks to be one of the brighter spots in the economy. Homebuilding is at its highest level in nearly four years. More homes are selling, and at higher prices.

The question, of course, is whether this is a solid enough foundation to sustain a full housing recovery.

Lawrence Yun, the chief economist for the National Association of Realtors, says housing woes are largely behind us.

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