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4:49 pm
Tue June 19, 2012

Failure: The F-Word Silicon Valley Loves And Hates

Tech entrepreneurs gather at the offices of Y Combinator, a company based in Mountain View, Calif., that provides seed money to young startups. Founder Paul Graham predicts half of the startups funded by Y Combinator will ultimately fail.
Melissa Block NPR

Originally published on Tue June 19, 2012 8:18 pm

In Silicon Valley, there's an "F word" that entrepreneurs say in polite company all the time: failure.

For every high-tech business success, there are countless failures in this California cradle of Internet startups. Here failure is accepted, or even welcomed, as a guide for future success.

In fact, failure is dissected in San Francisco at FailCon, an annual one-day conference where tech entrepreneurs and investors spill their guts and share lessons learned.

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The Salt
4:21 pm
Tue June 19, 2012

Surviving A Food Festival Without Getting A Tummy Ache

The Fancy Food Show floor in 2011.
Embajada del Ecuador en Estados Unidos Flickr.com

Originally published on Tue June 19, 2012 8:07 pm

I've never in my life desired a low-sodium biscuit, but I let the well-groomed woman at the Fancy Food Show in Washington, D.C. this week goad me into eating one.

"They're soooo good, I swear," she says.

It's perfectly fluffy and edible, this low-sodium biscuit, but seconds after it's gone I'm regretting having just wolfed down the whole thing. That's precious space in my stomach that I've just forfeited for an unremarkable food I'd never be interested in eating again.

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The Two-Way
4:19 pm
Tue June 19, 2012

Senators Ask Supreme Court To Televise Health Care Decision

The U.S. Supreme Court is seen in Washington, DC on June 18.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 19, 2012 4:40 pm

Two members of the Senate's Judiciary Committee are asking the Supreme Court to provide live coverage of its proceedings when it hands down its decision on the constitutionality of the 2010 health care law.

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Deceptive Cadence
4:18 pm
Tue June 19, 2012

The Cleveland Youth Orchestra: On The Road In Mozart's Hometown

The Cleveland Orchestra Youth Orchestra embarks on its first European tour.
Roger Mastroianni Cleveland Orchestra

Originally published on Wed June 27, 2012 1:19 pm

Nurturing young talent is a long tradition in the classical music world, and many professional orchestras have their own youth orchestras. But it stands to reason that an organization with the kind of international stature the Cleveland Orchestra enjoys would have a top-notch youth ensemble. It does. And it's called, not surprisingly, the Cleveland Orchestra Youth Orchestra — COYO for short. The young musicians have just embarked on a European tour.

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Planet Money
4:18 pm
Tue June 19, 2012

The Government Economist Who Thinks Like An Undercover Agent

Alex Wong Getty Images

This week in the New York Times Magazine, Adam Davidson looks at the enormous influence of the federal government's monthly jobs report. "Literally, markets move up and down based on the numbers we produce," says Abraham Mosisa, an economist at the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

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All Songs Considered Blog
4:08 pm
Tue June 19, 2012

Hear 'Follow,' A Warmly Chiming Mood-Setter From Diiv

Diiv.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 8:09 am

There's more than one way to qualify as a "guitar band": You can shred, sure, or you can lay down layer upon layer of guitars to weave an intricate tapestry. For Diiv — yes, the group was once called "Dive," and yes, it's from Brooklyn — guitars dominate, but as warm, chiming mood-setters.

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The Two-Way
4:01 pm
Tue June 19, 2012

Mubarak Suffers Stroke, Says Egyptian State TV

Egypt's ex-President Hosni Mubarak lays on a gurney inside a barred cage in the police academy courthouse in Cairo, Egypt during his sentencing in June.
AP

Originally published on Wed June 20, 2012 7:30 am

Quoting a "security official," the AP reports that Hosni Mubarak's heart stopped just as he reached a military hospital. Mubarak is now on life support.

The former Egyptian president, who ruled for 30 years, was being transfered to the military hospital from prison after suffering a stroke.

Reporting from Cairo, NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi-Nelson tells our Newscast unit that Mubarak's health has declined since he was sentenced in June.

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American Dreams: Then And Now
3:54 pm
Tue June 19, 2012

Hollywood Dreams Of Wealth, Youth And Beauty

Paulette Goddard in the Tramp's (Charlie Chaplin) dream of a middle-class life in Modern Times.
Chaplin/United Artists/The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Tue June 19, 2012 6:59 pm

Tinseltown didn't invent the American dream, but it sure put it out there for the world to see — a dream lit by the perpetual sunshine of Southern California, steeped in the values of the immigrant filmmakers who moved there in the early 1900s and got enormously rich.

It was their own outsider experience these Italian, Irish, German and often Jewish moviemakers were putting on screen, each optimistic, escapist fantasy a virtual American dream checklist:

  • Hard work carries the day in Mr. Smith Goes to Washington.
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A Blog Supreme
3:38 pm
Tue June 19, 2012

Five Jazz Songs Which Speak Of The Freedom Struggle

Gary Bartz performs at the 1973 Montreux Jazz Festival. The saxophonist is often cited as a messenger of black empowerment in music.
David Redfern Redferns

Originally published on Wed June 20, 2012 10:36 am

Today, June 19, is a holiday known as Juneteenth — the oldest commemoration of slavery's end. Though the Emancipation Proclamation declared the freedom of slaves in Confederate states on Jan. 1, 1863, it was only on June 19, 1865 (months after Confederate forces had surrendered) that Union soldiers landed at Galveston, Texas, to spread news of the war's end, and to enforce the proclamation in Texas. The date has since been noted in Texas and across the country as a celebration of African-American freedom and history, especially since the Civil Rights movement.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:35 pm
Tue June 19, 2012

Shocker: Doctors Work When They're Sick

Take a sick day, doc.
iStockphoto.com

How do doctors work around so many ill people without getting sick? Well, they don't.

Even if they scrub their hands like crazy, which certainly helps, they succumb to germs every once in a while, just like the rest of us. And also like lots of the rest of us, they'll go to work sick, a survey of medical residents finds.

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