NPR News

Pages

Food
6:12 am
Sun June 24, 2012

The Time Traveler's Cookbook: Meat-Lover's Edition

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 11:20 pm

For the next few days, NPR will be taking a closer look at meat consumption in America; we're calling it "Meat Week." One of our stories is about a recent interest in replicating the Paleolithic diet. Well, if you really want to eat like our distant ancestors, we have just the "cookbook" for you. Our tongue-in-cheek recipes — which we based on archeological digs and actual historical texts — trace humanity's changing relationship with meat. Current relationship status? It's complicated. (Scroll down to read more or click the link below to download a pdf version.)

Read more
Middle East
6:10 am
Sun June 24, 2012

Syrians Now Willing To Talk, But No Names, Please

President Bashar Assad addresses Parliament on June 3. Syrians in the capital, Damascus, have become more willing to speak out, though they still don't want to be identified by name. Many feel the Assad regime is losing control of parts of the country.
Anonymous SANA/AP

In Damascus, Syrians now openly speak their minds, but often won't offer a name for the record.

The "wall of fear" is crumbling even in the capital, where the security police have the heaviest presence. Syrians have lived under surveillance and emergency law for years, but after 15 months of anti-government protest and a brutal response by the regime, the killings have changed people.

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
6:04 am
Sun June 24, 2012

Countdown To The Supreme Court's Ruling On Health Care

People wait outside the Supreme Court last week for word on the fate of the federal health overhaul law.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 8:46 am

Anticipation has reached a fever pitch, and the waiting is almost over.

This week, the Supreme Court is almost certain to issue its decision on the constitutionality of President Obama's health care law. The decision could have far-reaching implications for the legal landscape, the nation's health care system and even the Supreme Court's legacy.

Read more
Author Interviews
6:04 am
Sun June 24, 2012

The Fight For The Right To Hear, 'Yes, Chef'

Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 1:50 pm

As you walk in the doors of Red Rooster, you immediately see a key piece of design: a bar dominates the front room, nearly touching the street, as if to say to the people of Harlem, N.Y., "Come on in."

The story behind the restaurant's owner, celebrity chef Marcus Samuelsson, is more about life than food.

Read more
National Security
6:02 am
Sun June 24, 2012

Planes, Patience And Slightly Kid-Friendlier Security

Some parents say the hardest part of flying with young kids on an airplane is dealing with unpredictable kids and adult passengers.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 7:31 am

It's 7 a.m. at the Kimball's Washington, D.C., home. Peter and Leslie Kimball are running up and down the stairs, changing diapers and trying to feed their kids breakfast.

They're packing for a work conference in Orlando, Fla., but they've also planned a surprise for their daughter Lane's birthday: a visit to Disney World.

This summer, more than 200 million people are expected to fly out of U.S. airports. The Kimballs are one of many families flying with their kids.

Read more
Election 2012
6:01 am
Sun June 24, 2012

Sen. Hatch Faces 'Youth Movement' In Utah Primary

Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch and former state Sen. Dan Liljenquist talk before a debate at KSL NewsRadio in Salt Lake City on June 15. The two face each other in the Utah Republican primary on Tuesday.
Laura Seitz AP

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 1:31 pm

The Tea Party revolution swept through Utah in 2010, when conservative favorite Mike Lee ousted three-term Republican Sen. Bob Bennett at the state party convention.

Perhaps the person watching the upset closest that day was Utah's longest-serving senator, Orrin Hatch. Now 78, Hatch is trying to keep his job in an anti-incumbent atmosphere that led to the defeat last month of his colleague Richard Lugar of Indiana.

Read more
National Teachers Initiative
6:00 am
Sun June 24, 2012

Former Dropouts Push Others To Reach Finish Line

Anthony Gonzales graduated on Tuesday from Learning Works charter school in Pasadena, Calif.
Learning Works

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 1:40 pm

In Pasadena, Calif., one teacher's devotion is helping kids graduate. Mikala Rahn is the founder of Learning Works, a charter school for kids who have dropped out of traditional schools.

Carlos Cruz is one of the first students she helped graduate. When he started senior year, Cruz realized he was two years behind.

"[I remember] you looking at me and telling me that everything was going to be OK," Cruz tells Rahn, "and me looking back at you, and I'm like, 'How the [expletive] do you think everything is going to be OK?' "

Rahn says it was optimism.

Read more
Sunday Puzzle
12:03 am
Sun June 24, 2012

Finding The Common Thread

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 7:31 am

On-Air Challenge: You are given three words starting with the letter "F." The answer is a word that can follow each of those three words to complete a familiar two-word phrase. For example, if given "flag, father's and field," the answer would be "day."

Last Week's Challenge From listener Kate MacDonald of Murphys, Calif.: Think of a common French word that everyone knows. Add a "V" to the beginning and an "E" at the end. The result will be the English-language equivalent of the French word. What is it?

Read more
Presidential Race
5:52 pm
Sat June 23, 2012

Putting A Positive Spin On Negative Campaigning

The 1988 presidential race between George H.W. Bush and Michael Dukakis is often considered one of the most negative elections in the modern era.
Lennox McLendon AP

Originally published on Sun June 24, 2012 6:46 am

The general presidential election is still months away, but President Obama and presumptive Republican nominee Mitt Romney are already hammering each other with attack ads.

Obama's most recent ads criticize Romney's time as a so-called "corporate raider," while Romney has released several ads seizing upon the president's statement that the "private sector is doing fine."

Read more
Around the Nation
4:56 pm
Sat June 23, 2012

University, Community Reacts To Sandusky Conviction

Originally published on Sat June 23, 2012 5:42 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

Jerry Sandusky will likely spend the rest of his life in prison. After just two days of deliberations, a jury found the former Penn State assistant coach guilty of sexually abusing 10 boys. He'll be sentenced in 90 days. But right now, the community where he lived and worked is trying to recover from the damage he caused.

NPR's Jeff Brady joins us from State College, Pennsylvania. And, Jeff, what are people saying about that verdict there today?

Read more

Pages