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Shots - Health News
6:07 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

More Clues About Hazards From Laundry Detergent Pods

A label warns parents to keep Tide laundry detergent packets away from small children.
Pat Sullivan AP

There's now a deeper look at young kids who got sick after eating or otherwise messing around with those laundry detergent pods that look a lot like candy.

Doctors from two poison control centers and the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention have analyzed more than a thousand incidents involving people exposed to the pods and other kinds of laundry detergent.

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The Two-Way
6:00 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

Immigration Arrest Near School, Sparks Protest In Detroit

Immigrant rights groups rallied in Detroit, yesterday, after Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials arrested one man and questioned another when they were on their way to drop their kids off at school.

Michigan Live reports:

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Around the Nation
5:37 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

To Shrink Rents, S.F. Considers Shrinking Apartments

The development firm Panoramic Interests is building about two dozen "micro-apartments" in San Francisco. The company is poised to offer even smaller units if the city approves a proposed new minimum size of 220 square feet.
Artist's Rendering of Smartspace Unit Courtesy of Panoramic Interests

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 8:32 pm

In many large cities, like Dallas, Phoenix and even parts of Chicago, $800 a month is enough for a clean one-bedroom apartment, decked out with a living room, washer and dryer — and maybe even a pool, in a larger complex.

But if you want to live alone in San Francisco, getting those amenities at that price is practically a pipe dream. With the region's resurgent high-tech industries luring many well-educated, well-paid workers to the Bay Area, the average rent for a studio apartment in the city now runs around $2,000.

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The Two-Way
5:04 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

Colombia, Rebel Group Will Continue Peace Talks In Cuba

Colombia's government head of negotiators Humberto de la Calle (second to the left), speaks next to the delegation members prior to boarding a plane to Oslo, Norway, on Tuesday.
Eitan Abramovich AFP/Getty Images

After a first round of historic peace talks, the Colombian government and members of the rebel Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia have agreed to continue peace talks in Havana, Cuba.

It was just this summer that President Juan Manuel Santos acknowledged for the first time that the two groups were engaged in "exploratory talks" aimed at bringing the longest war in the Western Hemisphere to an end.

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Media
4:59 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

After 80 Years In Print, 'Newsweek' To Go All Digital

Tina Brown, editor-in-chief of Newsweek, announced Thursday that the 80-year-old newsmagazine will publish its final print edition on Dec. 31 and shift to an all-digital format in early 2013.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 8:00 pm

Newsweek editor Tina Brown announced Thursday she would embrace a fully digital future as she revealed that the magazine's final print edition would be published at the end of the year.

Her announcement was a bow to gravity, as her unique blend of buzz and brio proved incapable of counteracting Newsweek's plummeting circulation and advertising amid an accelerating news cycle. Brown said there would be an unspecified number of layoffs as well.

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Around the Nation
4:40 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

Boy Scouts Forced To Show Sex Abuse Allegations

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 8:01 pm

Records of Boy Scout leaders accused of child molestation between the mid-1960s and the 1980s were made public today. The Oregon Supreme court ordered the release of the so-called "perversion files" over the objections of the Boy Scouts of America, who wanted them to remain confidential.

Health Care
4:40 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

'Times' Health Care Op-Ed Gets Unexpected Response

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 8:00 pm

Robert Siegel talks to New York Times columnist Nick Kristof about his friend and college roommate Scott Androes, who was diagnosed with Stage Four prostate cancer. In two recent columns, Kristof wrote about Androes, who didn't have health insurance at the time of the diagnosis. In Thursday's paper, Kristof writes that Androes drifted into a coma Sunday and died Monday morning.

Business
4:40 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

Premature Press Release Makes Google Shares Plunge

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 8:00 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Google's high-flying stock hit some turbulence today. Its shares were down as much as 10 percent before trading was temporarily halted. The drop came after the company's quarterly earnings report was released prematurely, a report that showed Google struggling in the third quarter. NPR's Steve Henn reports.

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Around the Nation
4:40 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

Remote Alaskan Villages Get Indoor Plumbing

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 8:00 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Music
4:40 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

The Price Of Fame: Rolling Stones Tickets Then And Now

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 8:00 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

While Radio Liberty struggles to reinvent itself, this week brought a big announcement from a group that has dominated the radio for half a century.

SIR MICK JAGGER: Soon we'll be back on stage playing for you in two cities that know how to rock and roll.

SIEGEL: That's the Rolling Stones announcing a new concert tour to celebrate their 50th anniversary. They've scheduled four shows so far, starting next month, two in Newark, New Jersey and two in their hometown of London.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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