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The Two-Way
12:22 pm
Mon November 5, 2012

Boy Killed By Dogs At Pittsburgh Zoo: Onlookers' Screams 'Just Kept Coming'

A security guard closes the gate at the Pittsburgh Zoo, where a 2-year-old boy was killed Sunday.
John Heller AP

Originally published on Mon November 5, 2012 1:28 pm

Witnesses describe a horribly heartbreaking scene Sunday at the Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium after a 2-year-old boy fell into an exhibit housing wild African dogs.

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Education
11:52 am
Mon November 5, 2012

Is A Law Degree Still Worth It?

Originally published on Mon November 5, 2012 2:03 pm

A law degree used to pretty much guarantee a stable job. But journalist Elizabeth Lesly Stevens reports that thousands of law students are going into an industry that no longer has room for them. Stevens discusses her article with host Michel Martin, and they hear from NPR Facebook fans about whether a law degree is still worth it.

Election 2012
11:52 am
Mon November 5, 2012

Polls Put Race Within 'The Margin Of Litigation'

Election Day 2000 ended in a stalemate and weeks of finger-pointing and legal battles. Host Michel Martin looks at whether the country has learned the lessons from that crisis in time for Tuesday's vote. She speaks with Ilya Shapiro of the Cato Institute, and Robert Pastor of the Center for Democracy and Election Management at American University.

Around the Nation
11:52 am
Mon November 5, 2012

NY Public Housing Residents Hit Hard By Sandy

Nearly a week after superstorm Sandy pummeled the East Coast, thousands of Americans are still without basics like power and clean water. Host Michel Martin speaks with New York Times reporter Michael Wilson about how some New York Public Housing residents are facing unique challenges in the storm's aftermath.

Education
11:52 am
Mon November 5, 2012

A Lesson In Making Math Cool For Girls

Originally published on Mon November 5, 2012 1:59 pm

Women make up nearly half of the college-educated workforce, but hold less than a quarter of STEM jobs — as in jobs that involve science, technology, engineering and math. Actress turned mathematician Danica McKellar wants to turn those numbers around. She speaks to host Michel Martin about her latest math book for young girls, Girls Get Curves.

Deceptive Cadence
11:50 am
Mon November 5, 2012

Pianist Gabriela Montero's Election Improv

Gabriela Montero takes ideas from audience members to create on the spot improvisations.
Colin Bell

Originally published on Mon November 5, 2012 12:36 pm

Few classical musicians these days are serious improvisers — aside from organists and early-music practitioners. But pianist Gabriela Montero is absolutely fearless when it comes to creating a new piece, right out of the air, right on the spot. At her concerts she takes requests from audience members. They can suggest a song for her to improvise on, or simply a topic of interest.

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The Two-Way
11:05 am
Mon November 5, 2012

'Insult To Injury': Nor'easter Targets New York, New Jersey

Another significant storm is looking likely for New York and New Jersey, forecasters are warning.

The Washington Post's Capital Weather Gang says the computer models have come into agreement, forecasting a Nor'easter to begin forming election night and then move up the east coast on Wednesday and Thursday.

The Capital Weather Gang reports:

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It's All Politics
11:02 am
Mon November 5, 2012

Arab-American Voters Lean Toward Obama, But With Less Enthusiasm

Originally published on Sun November 11, 2012 8:32 am

Arab-American voters strongly supported President Obama in 2008, and polls show most are doing so this time around as well. But some of those voters are concerned about the way Obama has handled issues important to their community — even if they still intend to cast their ballots for his re-election.

At the Washington, D.C., headquarters of the Arab American Institute, the walls are full of red, white and blue signs in English and Arabic urging people to vote.

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The Two-Way
10:18 am
Mon November 5, 2012

In New York City, More Signs Of Normal As Schools Reopen After Sandy

Commuters disembark the Staten Island Ferry one week after Superstorm Sandy crashed into the metropolitan area.
John Minchillo AP

Originally published on Mon November 5, 2012 10:28 am

Some schools don't have heat. Others are serving their students shelf-safe milk.

But today, most of New York City's 1,700 schools reopened for the first time since Sandy devastated the northeast. NPR's Margot Adler has been working her way through Manhattan. She visited PS-41 in Greenwich Village and reports everything was great. But then, as she walked west on Houston St. all the way to East River, she stopped by Bard High School Early College.

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Shots - Health News
9:39 am
Mon November 5, 2012

What We Wanted To Tell You About Mumps But Couldn't

Each dot represents one case of mumps between late June 2009 and late June 2010.
The New England Journal of Medicine

Last week, we wrote about an outbreak of mumps within several Orthodox Jewish communities in and around New York City.

We told you how the outbreak spread so rapidly in 2009 that public health officials tried something that hadn't been done before. Doctors gave uninfected children who'd already been immunized a third booster shot of the measles-mumps-rubella, or MMR, vaccine. Two doses is the usual regimen.

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