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YouTube tries to make nice with its creators

Jun 22, 2018

YouTube has had a bad year. One of its biggest stars, Logan Paul, filmed the body of a suicide victim. Advertisers boycotted over inappropriate content, and parents panicked over violent and sexual videos showing up in the site’s kids' channel. Competition is also growing. Facebook is building a system to connect influencers with brands. And Instagram launched new video tools on Wednesday. So on Thursday YouTube's chief product officer, Neal Mohan, announced new ways for YouTube creators to make money.

YouTube tries to make nice with creators

Jun 22, 2018

YouTube has had a bad year. One of its biggest stars, Logan Paul, filmed the body of a suicide victim. Advertisers boycotted over inappropriate content, and parents panicked over violent and sexual videos showing up in the site’s kids’ channel. Competition is also growing. Facebook is building a system to connect influencers with brands. And Instagram launched new video tools on Wednesday. So on Thursday, YouTube's chief product officer, Neal Mohan, announced new ways for YouTube creators to make money.

As the other kids cry inconsolably on an audio recording of migrant children, 6-year-old Alison Jimena Valencia Madrid can be heard pleading for someone to call her aunt — reciting the number in Spanish.

Jimena is from El Salvador, and had just crossed into the U.S. before she was detained and separated from her mother.

"For the last 14 years I had been a stay at home mom and a soccer mom of three kids," says Lori Alhadeff. "On Valentine's Day my daughter was brutally shot down and murdered and I became a school safety activist."

That day at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, when a 19-year-old former student killed Alyssa Alhadeff and 16 other people, changed many lives.

And it pushed the question of school safety once again to the front and center.

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Phillie Phanatic Injures Fan With Hot Dog

Jun 22, 2018

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EU Begins Tariffs On U.S. Goods

Jun 22, 2018

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Conservative columnist Charles Krauthammer died yesterday at the age of 68.

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Krauthammer was a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist who wrote a regular column for The Washington Post. He was also a longtime contributor to Fox News.

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Growing up, half sisters Glennette Rozelle and Jennifer Mack were used to hearing their parents fight.

At StoryCorps, the women remember the night that changed everything for their family.

It was Valentine's Day, 1977. Minnie Wallace and Virgil "Glenn" Wallace were raising four children outside Oklahoma City. Glennette, then 7, and 10-year-old Jennifer, who was Glenn's stepdaughter, were home on a night that took them decades to process.

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Republican lawmakers in the House have punted on immigration yet again.

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The police killings of unarmed black Americans impact the mental health of people far beyond those who knew the victim directly. A new study is delving into this, and Karen Grigsby Bates for a Code Switch team has more.

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Whenever a symphony orchestra or opera house loses its financial footing, a chorus of classical music "coroners" quickly steps up to pronounce the imminent demise of an entire genre. The pianist and scholar Charles Rosen put it best when he said, "The death of classical music is perhaps its oldest continuing tradition."

The controversy over President Trump's executive order to end the policy of separating migrant families who cross into the U.S. illegally is shifting to the courts.

Do you see a blue dress or a gold dress? Well, this time it's a green Zara jacket. And the color doesn't matter — it's what's written on the back in big white graffiti lettering: "I REALLY DON'T CARE, DO U?"

Navigating the objection phase of the tariff exemption process

Jun 21, 2018

This week, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross announced the first official exemptions and rejections for companies that applied for exclusions from steel and aluminum tariffs. For seven lucky companies, that means they'll get to stop paying the tariffs on specific imports — 25 percent for steel and 10 percent for aluminum.

Updated at 9:42 p.m. ET

Charles Krauthammer, the prominent Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for the Washington Post and commentator for the Fox News Channel, has died.

His death was confirmed by Fred Hiatt, the editorial page editor for the Post. The cause of Krauthammer's death was cancer. He was 68.

How Trump's immigration policy is hurting commerce at the border

Jun 21, 2018

In Brownsville, Texas, the neighboring city Matamoros, in Tamaulipas, Mexico, is just a 10-minute walk away. As the Trump administration's immigration policy causes tension nationally, Brownsville's local economy feels its effects first hand. Marketplace’s Andy Uhler spent some time on both sides of the border and talked with host Kai Ryssdal about what he saw. The following is an edited transcript of their conversation.

Opportunity, phone home!

NASA scientists are still holding out hope they will hear from the surprisingly long-lived Mars rover. It went into snooze mode earlier this month, thanks to a gargantuan dust storm on the Red Planet that's blocking beams from reaching the solar panels that recharge the rover's batteries.

Germany automakers are looking for a better trade deal

Jun 21, 2018

Steel and aluminum have been getting most of the tariff coverage, but automakers, specifically European carmakers, are getting some attention on their willingness to negotiate tariffs on U.S.-imported vehicles. Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal talked to William Boston, reporter from the Wall Street Journal, about the proposal and how that is going to play in the global car market. 

Kai Ryssdal: What is the proposal that does seem to be on the table here then?

By a razor-thin margin, the House of Representatives passed its version of the farm bill Thursday as Republican leadership was able to round up just enough support from members of its conservative wing to clear passage.

The GOP-backed measure, which covers farm and food policy legislation, passed 213-211.

The $867 billion package renews the safety net for farmers across the country, but also includes tougher work requirements for recipients of the Supplemental Nutrition Program or SNAP, formerly known as food stamps.

A Texas sheriff has barred his deputies from taking on additional work as off-duty security at a recently built tent encampment intended to house migrant children separated from their parents at the border.

El Paso Sheriff Richard Wiles said he feared the assignment to oversee minors forcibly separated from their parents would fuel the current controversy over the practice and undermine trust between law enforcement and the people they serve.

In a 5-to-4 decision in the case of South Dakota v. Wayfair, the Supreme Court majority ruled that South Dakota can require online retailers that do not have a physical presence in the state to collect state sales tax on purchases by state residents.

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OK, so the Dow Jones tracks how 30 big companies are trading. These companies are all American, all blue-chip. This week's GE news got us wondering, why 30? And how relevant is the Dow these days as a measure of the health of the economy?

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OPEC meetings are underway in Vienna, and for now, indications are that oil-producing countries will agree to lift some of the production limits they set 18 months ago. We look into how any changes out of the OPEC summit could ripple through the global economy.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

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