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2:17 pm
Mon December 10, 2012

K'Naan On Cheapening His Music For The Money

Somali-Canadian rapper K'Naan released his first album in 2005.
Alberto E. Rodriguez Getty Images

Originally published on Thu December 13, 2012 2:30 pm

Somali-born rapper and musician K'naan became a success based, at least in part, on gritty stories from his childhood in war-torn Mogadishu. But on his most recent album, Country, God, Or the Girl, the edginess of past songs has been replaced with a polished pop sound and lyrics directed to a young American audience.

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Africa
2:08 pm
Mon December 10, 2012

The U.S. Role In Egypt's Battle For Democracy

Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi authorized the military to secure the country ahead of a controversial referendum on a draft constitution β€” a move that some compared to martial law. The opposition is split over what to do β€” vote down the constitution or boycott the vote altogether.

The Picture Show
1:35 pm
Mon December 10, 2012

A Black And White 1860s Fundraiser

Rosa, Charley and Rebecca are three of eight freed slaves who sat for portraits in 1863-1864 that were sold to raise money to fund schools for emancipated slaves in Louisiana. The three were chosen because it was believed their near-white complexions would draw more sympathy Ҁ” and support Ҁ” from a country torn apart by slavery and civil war.
Charles Paxson Library of Congress

Originally published on Mon December 10, 2012 5:05 pm

They look like any other 19th century vignettes and portraits of children kneeling in prayer or cloaked in the U.S. flag.

But these cartes de visite (a calling card with a portrait mounted on it that was all the rage during the 1860s) featured Charles, Rebecca and Rosa β€” former slave children who looked white.

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The Two-Way
12:27 pm
Mon December 10, 2012

Many Apps For Children Still Raise Privacy Concerns, FTC Says

Who's collecting information about her?
Peggy Turbett The Plain Dealer /Landov

Originally published on Mon December 10, 2012 8:44 pm

Developers of smartphone and tablet apps aimed at children have done little in the past year to give parents "the information they need to determine what data is being collected from their children, how it is being shared, or who will have access to it," the Federal Trade Commission reports.

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Author Interviews
12:09 pm
Mon December 10, 2012

Lemony Snicket Dons A Trenchcoat

Meredith Heuer Courtesy of Little, Brown & Co.

Originally published on Mon December 10, 2012 1:53 pm

It's been more than six years since Daniel Handler, aka Lemony Snicket, concluded his enormously popular 13-volume young adult series, A Series of Unfortunate Events. Now Handler has revived the Snicket narrator in his YA novel Who Could That Be at This Hour?

The book is the first of a series β€” All the Wrong Questions β€” and a prequel to A Series of Unfortunate Events. It tracks the young Snicket's adventures during his apprenticeship at the V.F.D., a mysterious organization that readers familiar with the Snicket stories will recognize.

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Behind Closed Doors
12:00 pm
Mon December 10, 2012

Transgender Woman Finds Acceptance In South Korea

Originally published on Mon December 10, 2012 12:46 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Now we go behind closed doors. That's where we talk about issues people usually keep private.

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Economy
12:00 pm
Mon December 10, 2012

Fiscal Cliff: Cutting the Untouchable?

Originally published on Mon December 10, 2012 12:46 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, we'll hear about elections in Ghana. We'll talk about whether the election of President John Dramani Mahama to a new term confirms the country's reputation for leadership in democratic processes, or perhaps undermines it. That's later.

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Africa
12:00 pm
Mon December 10, 2012

Trying To Reform Nigeria Amid Family Kidnapping

Originally published on Mon December 10, 2012 12:46 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We want to turn now from Ghana to Nigeria, where there is disturbing news. The mother of Nigeria's finance minister, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, was kidnapped this weekend. Police say they've launched a massive search to find her.

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Europe
11:47 am
Mon December 10, 2012

Spain's Crisis Leads To Rise Of Grass-Roots Groups

A demonstrator shouts during a protest against housing evictions in Madrid last month. The sign to his right reads, "Stop evictions."
Pablo Blazquez Dominguez Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 10, 2012 8:44 pm

A year and a half ago, recession-ravaged Spanish society reacted to the economic crisis with the "Indignados," a mass protest that inspired the worldwide "Occupy" movement.

The "angry ones" are long gone from Spanish streets, but they've evolved into many grass-roots associations now filling the gaps left by the eroding welfare state, spawning a new form of anti-austerity resistance that embraces all branches of society, from those who have lost homes to foreclosures, to the entire judiciary.

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The Two-Way
11:43 am
Mon December 10, 2012

After Helping Europe Rise From Ashes, EU Accepts Nobel Peace Prize

European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso of Portugal during today's Nobel Peace Prize ceremony in Oslo.
Nigel Waldron Getty Images

Giving the 2012 Nobel Peace Prize to the European Union has been controversial.

As The Associated Press reports:

Three previous Peace Prize laureates "South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Mairead Maguire of Northern Ireland and Adolfo Perez Esquivel from Argentina, have demanded that the prize money of $1.2 million not be paid this year. They say the bloc contradicts the values associated with the prize because it relies on military force to ensure security."

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