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The Two-Way
12:15 pm
Wed December 5, 2012

Legendary Jazz Musician Dave Brubeck Dies

Dave Brubeck performs along with his Dave Brubeck Quartet in November 2005.
Timm Schamberger AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu December 6, 2012 11:36 am

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The Two-Way
12:10 pm
Wed December 5, 2012

VIDEO: Missouri Bridge Blows Up Real Good (On Purpose)

Boom! The westbound side of Missouri's Blanchette Bridge went down Tuesday.
Missouri Department of Transportation

We're little kids when it comes to watching things blow up.

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History
12:04 pm
Wed December 5, 2012

Buying Freedom Through Dressmaking

Originally published on Wed December 5, 2012 12:30 pm

The new movie 'Lincoln' explores the last months of Abraham Lincoln's life and sheds light on prominent figures of the time. One lesser-known person is former slave Elizabeth Keckley. She became a close confidante to Mary Todd Lincoln. Host Michel Martin speaks with professor Clarence Lusane about Keckley's contributions to American history.

Education
12:04 pm
Wed December 5, 2012

Grading Kids On Race

Some public schools across the U.S. are setting different standards for students based on their race. The goal is to cut the achievement gap in half. Host Michel Martin speaks with Emily Richmond, of the Education Writers Association, about criticisms to this approach.

Economy
12:04 pm
Wed December 5, 2012

How Helpful Is Extending Unemployment Benefits?

Originally published on Wed December 5, 2012 12:30 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, for years now we've been talking about ways to close the achievement gap. Now some states are asking to set standards based on race. You can imagine why this is controversial. So we'll try to learn more about this in just a few minutes.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:19 am
Wed December 5, 2012

A Choral Christmas With Stile Antico

The London-based a cappella choir Stile Antico brings a program of Christmas music to Cambridge, Mass.
Marco Borggreve

Originally published on Wed December 5, 2012 9:55 pm

Stile Antico is a 13-member a cappella choir based in London. Most of these fresh-faced singers are still in their 20s, but they've already racked up some impressive awards for their recordings — mainly of intricately woven music from the Renaissance.

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The Two-Way
11:11 am
Wed December 5, 2012

China's Communists Declare War ... On Boring Meetings

Must ... stay .... awake: A Chinese paramilitary police officer yawns and his colleagues fall asleep while then-President Hu Jintao delivers a speech at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, Dec. 18, 2008.
Andy Wong AP

Originally published on Wed December 5, 2012 9:14 pm

Suffer from insomnia? The droning rhythm of a Chinese Communist official reading a work report out loud will likely do the trick.

It certainly does for many party members: Just 10 minutes into any party meeting, look down the serried ranks of the attendees, and you'll spot the dozers and snoozers, napping away, heads lolling lazily toward their neighbors.

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The Two-Way
11:09 am
Wed December 5, 2012

Citigroup Cutting 11,000 Jobs, Taking $1.1 Billion In Charges

Chris Hondros Getty Images

Originally published on Wed December 5, 2012 2:48 pm

Saying it needs to "further reduce expenses and improve efficiency across the company," Citigroup announced today that it is eliminating about 11,000 jobs — 4 percent of its global workforce.

The banking giant also said it is expects to take "pre-tax charges of approximately $1 billion in the fourth quarter of 2012 and approximately $100 million of related charges in the first half of 2013."

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The Two-Way
10:25 am
Wed December 5, 2012

'NY Post' Photographer: I Was Too Far Away To Reach Man Hit By Train

Before the attack: Two men are seen talking on a New York City subway platform Monday in this framegrab from a video released by the New York City Police Department. Moments later, police say, Ki-Suk Han (whose face is obscured) was pushed on to the tracks.
New York City Police Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu December 13, 2012 3:26 pm

It's a horrifying image that has sparked a passionate debate.

By now you've probably heard about the front page photo on Tuesday's New York Post of a man struggling to climb out of an approaching subway train's way. He had been pushed on to the tracks by a stranger.

Ki-Suck Han, 58, did not make it. He died from the injuries he received.

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Shots - Health News
9:51 am
Wed December 5, 2012

Medical Residents Work Long Hours Despite Rules

To reduce errors by doctors in training, medical educators have capped how long they can work. But enforcing the limits can be a challenge.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu December 6, 2012 10:05 am

More than 10 years after she was a internal medicine resident, Dr. Vineet Arora still thinks about how her shifts used to end.

She says the best shift change was one that didn't require her to transfer single patient to the next bunch of residents. "A good sign out was 'nothing to do,' " she recalls. "When I trained, you worked here until your work was done."

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