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(U.S. Edition) The Senate has to approve a spending bill by midnight to keep the government from shutting down, but the votes just don't seem to be there. Jim Kessler, from the centrist think tank Third Way, explains which groups and agencies could be affected. Afterwards, we'll discuss a recent survey that finds in many cases, employees who were sexually harassed never reported it to management. Plus: We look at Jordan's dependence on the U.S. for foreign aid, and what the future of that relationship looks like now that the U.S.

A favorite pastime for April Gibson and her teenage son, Gregory Bess, is simply talking to one another.

"I think I learn more from those conversations than school," says Gregory, who turned 17 on Thursday.

But during a recent StoryCorps conversation in St. Paul, Minn., April, 33, knew he wanted to talk about a subject the two hadn't really explored.

April invited her son to ask about what that time was like for her, as a young black mother. "Now you can ask me the hard question," April says.

"What did you feel like when I was born?" Gregory asks.

On Sunday, people around the country will mark one year since the Women's March on Washington, D.C. Last year it brought hundreds of thousands of liberals to the capital, many wearing pink knitted caps in solidarity. Others marched in hundreds of cities and towns across the United States and more than 80 other countries.

If President Trump's first year in office seemed chaotic from a staffing perspective, there's a reason. Turnover among top-level staff in the Trump White House was off the charts, according to a new Brookings Institution report.

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A powerful storm that brought hurricane-force winds to parts of Western Europe, bringing floods, causing downed trees and halting public transport, has been blamed for at least nine deaths in four countries.

The Netherlands, Germany, France and Belgium got the brunt of the unusual storm system. Some areas saw winds up to 126 mph.

Adm. Stansfield Turner, who led the Central Intelligence Agency under President Jimmy Carter and presided over a controversial downsizing of its clandestine operations, has died. He was 94.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … New figures show Venezuela’s oil output plunged again last year, continuing a yearlong streak of falling production. What will it mean for the economy as inflation soars and quality of life for residents declines? Then, evidence is growing against a Taiwanese businessman accused of selling oil to North Korea in violation of U.N. sanctions. Afterwards, we’ll tell you what new U.S. satellite images reveal about our planet. There's so much debris floating around Earth, it looks like a swarm of insects.

Why most employees still won’t report sexual harassment

4 hours ago

Despite the growing number of women speaking out publicly about sexual harassment in the workplace, a recent survey found that in many cases, employees who were sexually harassed never reported it to management, in fear of being labeled a “troublemaker.”

“Others said it was their word against the other person’s. Or, they’re afraid of losing their job,” said Ladan Nikravan Hayes, a career advisor at CareerBuilder, the company behind the survey.

Two boys have been charged with killing a half-million bees after they allegedly vandalized a honey farm in Sioux City, Iowa, knocking over hives and exposing the bees to deadly winter temperatures.

The suspects are 12 and 13 years old and their names are not being released because of their age.

01/19/18: The healthy race to measure health

5 hours ago

There are lots of startups as well as established tech companies, like Apple and Google, that are interested in measuring our waists and monitoring our blood pressure. But as the Food and Drug Administration loosens regulations in the digital health space, who’s looking out for the consumers? On our segment Quality Assurance — a second look at the week’s tech news — Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood talks about the regulation of health tech with CNBC's Christina Farr.

As anti-abortion rights activists gather at the National Mall for the 45th annual rally known as the March for Life, they'll hear a history-making address from the man who's become an unlikely champion of their cause: President Trump.

Trump is scheduled to speak live via satellite from the White House Rose Garden before marchers begin their walk through the nation's capital in protest of legalized abortion.

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A tablespoon of soil contains billions of microscopic organisms. Life on Earth, especially the growing of food, depends on these microbes, but scientists don't even have names for most of them, much less a description.

That's changing, slowly, thanks to researchers like Noah Fierer, at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Fierer think microbes have lived in obscurity for too long. "They do a lot of important things for us, directly or indirectly, and I hope they get the respect they deserve," he says.

On Thursday, USA Gymnastics announced they will stop using the Karolyi Ranch — the site of many of the atrocities committed against Olympians by Larry Nassar, the team's former doctor. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks to New York Times reporter, Juliet Macur about what happens next as Nassar faces sentencing hearings this week.

Editor's note: This report includes disturbing descriptions of abuse.

Last June, a jury found former Milwaukee police officer Dominique Heaggan-Brown not guilty of first-degree reckless homicide. Now, Heaggan-Brown is taking a plea deal over separate sexual assault allegations that led the Milwaukee Police Department to fire him.

The shooting death of Sylville Smith, a 23-year-old black man, ignited riots in the north side of Milwaukee in August 2016.

One year later: we check in on the refugee settlement in Erie, Pennsylvania

17 hours ago

In January of 2017, Marketplace traveled to Erie, Pennsylvania to do a live show the day before President Trump's inauguration as part of our series The Big Promise. The particular politics of Erie, voting twice for President Obama and then for Trump, have made it a microcosm of the larger political and socioeconomic climate in America. That includes the way its economy has changed over the past couple of decades -- specifically, the number of immigrants and refugees who joined the workforce.

It wouldn't make any sense to send a French-speaking refugee to a German-speaking town in Switzerland.

But under Switzerland's current system of placing refugees, that's a situation that can easily happen. This problem isn't unique to Switzerland, and it's not the only kind of mismatch that might happen.

You may need to get used to the threat of government shutdown

18 hours ago

There is currently no plan to fund the federal government beyond tomorrow. Lawmakers have yet to agree on a continuing resolution to fund the government. The deadline to do so is this Friday at midnight. To get a sense of how budget negotiations used to go—and whether we can expect the current state of affairs to be the new normal—Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal spoke with Stan Collender, professor of public policy at Georgetown. 

Baltimore public schools' heating crisis earlier this month was a "day of reckoning" for the system, the city, and the state said public schools CEO Sonja Santelises. The crisis, she said in an interview with WYPR Wednesday, exposed the truth that Baltimore city school buildings are less than functional.

Over the last month, in a series of volatile swings, the price of the cryptocurrency bitcoin rose to a record high — then plunged to less than half that value.

The abrupt changes have inspired comparisons to the dot-com bubble, and underscored the extremely speculative nature of investing in cryptocurrency.

Editor's note: This report includes disturbing descriptions of child abuse.

Updated at 5:30 p.m. ET

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