WHQR

Communique: "The Donut Inn" Sends Donuts Out | Donut Donations For Non-Profits

How did two humanitarians end up owning and managing a donut cafe? I wondered, so I invited the owners of Wilmington's The Donut Inn to the studio for a chat. Matt Anlyan and Allen Renquist had a lot to say about the kind of outreach a business like theirs can do; listen to an excerpt from Renquist above.

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Giulian Frisoni: https://www.flickr.com/photos/giulianfrisoni/30021521302/

It seems like a no-brainer: Both recreational and commercial fishermen want a lot of fish.  But how they balance and protect that resource – that’s where the problems arise.  House Bill 867, which was filed in the North Carolina General Assembly last month, would shift the NC Marine Fisheries Commission’s focus from sustaining populations to conserving stock.

Derek Keats, Flickr Creative Commons: https://www.flickr.com/photos/dkeats/5645778206/

New legislation is working its way through the North Carolina General Assembly, and its focus is on the balance between conservation and sustainability of fish stocks. On last week’s CoastLine, Rachel Lewis Hilburn sat down with biologist Jess Hawkins, Dick Brame of Coastal Conservation Association of North Carolina, and Jerry Schill of the North Carolina Fisheries Association. While all guests share a love of fishing, their ideas about preservation are quite different…

Creative Commons Zero - CCO

On Wednesday’s CoastLine: The coastal Carolinas are known for their fishing – both commercial and recreational. We’ll hear about how those two sectors can sometimes clash, as well as proposed legislation that would affect the industry. 

I’m going to deal today with an issue worthy of serious attention. This past Monday Pat Marriott, on his Evening Concert program on Classical HQR, played music by Felix Draeseke. That’s an unfamiliar name in music, and Pat explained on Monday morning that the works of Draeseke were favored by “the cultural authorities of the Third Reich”, then largely disappeared after World War II, but are now coming to public attention again. We immediately heard from listener E: “I find [Pat’s] choice, his timing, and his words to be particularly scary, alarming, and distressing."

Temple of Israel

This isn't the first time Rabbi Paul Sidlofsky has invited the non-Jewish community to the Temple of Israel. He says visitors are always welcome, but he's been setting aside special Sabbath evening services for visitors for 6 years now. Initially, the plan was to do it once a year...due to popular demand, this "Invite Your Neighbor" service is now twice a year. His aim is not to convert people, but to open up communication with the community. He says this year, this kind of outreach is more important than ever.

Big Dawg Productions

Actresses Chris Brown and Irene Slater say Big Dawg's latest play, Over the River and Through the Woods, is hilarious--but they advise bringing a tissue for the tears. They both know this show well: 10 years ago, they played the parts they play now (grandmothers Emma and Aida), then opposite grandfathers played by Donn Ansell and Frank Capasso. Both Donn and Frank have passed away since. Listen above to hear Chris and Irene talk about the poignancy of the show itself and their own emotional journey performing it again.

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Cameron Art Museum has a monthly family art program called "Kids at CAM," but this month, the program is more like "festival at CAM."  It's called Summer Roll-Out, and several artists will give demonstrations and invite children and adults to participate in a variety of activities. It's Saturday, May 6, Noon-3:00pm. This is a kick-off for the camps, workshops, and classes for youth and adults offered this summer. See a list of activities and artists below, and listen above to Georgia Mastroieni, Director of Youth and Family Education, and Donna Moore, Museum School Director, talk about making art with adults and kids.

Vince Winkel

Confederate Memorial Day is a state holiday in North Carolina, officially observed on May 10. Six other states celebrate the holiday. It’s not without controversy. In New Orleans, Confederate monuments are now being removed from public places. Meanwhile, at Fort Fisher, a new interpretive marker was just dedicated next to the Confederate Monument. The service was more about men … than soldiers.

Peggy Porter is a long-time resident of New Hanover County, and a former teacher of U.S. History and Civics. 

You can hear more from Peggy and our other commentators at our website: WHQR DOT O-R-G. Just click on "Commentary." 

Erin Whittle/Forward Motion Dance

Dancer, choreographer, and organizer Tracey Varga presents the 16th Annual Art Sensation this weekend. This yearly celebration of dance and music for a cause is produced by Varga's company, Forward Motion Dance. The beneficiary of funds raised this year is Cape Fear River Watch. The first act of the show features musical guest Port City Trio. The second act is a variety of dance performances, from ballroom to ballet to belly dancing. Tracey Varga and Port City Trio percussionist, Woody Dobson, joined us; listen above.

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The Latest News From NPR

The Supreme Court has effectively struck down two North Carolina congressional districts, saying that the state relied too heavily on race in drawing them.

Former Trump national security adviser Michael Flynn is invoking his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination on Monday, refusing to hand over documents subpoenaed by the Senate Intelligence Committee.

The panel wants to see documents relating to Flynn's interactions with Russian officials as part of its probe into Russia's meddling in the 2016 presidential election.

In a visit fraught with symbolism, President Trump on Monday became the first sitting U.S. president to set foot in the Old City of Jerusalem.

The president and first lady Melania Trump visited the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, traditional site of Jesus' crucifixion, burial and resurrection, and the Western Wall, part of the Jewish temple complex destroyed by Rome in 70 C.E.

Lawyers for Bill Cosby will get their first glimpse on Monday of potential jurors who will decide the fate of the 79-year-old comedian in his criminal trial on sexual assault charges in Pennsylvania.

Cosby has maintained his innocence in the face of three felony counts of aggravated indecent assault over a 2004 encounter at his suburban Philadelphia mansion.

Now, after one and a half years of hearings, the trial is finally about to begin, pitting the story of Andrea Constand against Cosby's defense.

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WHQR's Annual Fundraising Luncheon

**EVENT FULL** WHQR's Annual Fundraising Luncheon Featuring Melissa Block

Tuesday, May 23rd
12:00–1:30 pm
The Hilton Grand Ballroom

Cinematique Presents

Cinématique Presents "The Sense of an Ending"

May 22 - 24
Monday and Tuesday
at 7pm
Wednesday at 4 pm and 7 pm
Thalian Hall Main Stage

Soup to Nuts LIVE! Presents: Derwin Hinson & Cre8tive Coast

Thursday, 05/25
Doors open 6:30pm
Show starts 7:30pm

Call For Art Submissions

WHQR is Currently Accepting Submissions From Artists

In the MC Erny Gallery

The MC Erny Gallery Presents "Nevermore..."

Opening Reception Friday, May 26th, Closing Reception Friday, June 23rd, Show Closes Friday, July 13th.

Prologue

Prologue

With Kristy Woodson Harvey
Monday, June 5th, 7 pm
The MC Erny Gallery at WHQR

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WHQR Commentary: "Facebook Manners"

Commentator Bridget Callahan is new to WHQR; this is her first commentary. Bridget is a writer and comedian, an editor for The Tusk magazine, and an entertainment correspondent for Star News. She makes her home in Wilmington. The internet brings out the worst in all of us. Even if you think you are careful, you’re one of the good ones, you’re not one of the evil trolls, it’ll still get you. On facebook the other day my friend posted “I wonder if I know anyone with Yaumacon contacts.” And my...

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