Bach's (Birthday) Lunch! Bring Your Lunch-We'll Have The Cake | Friday, March 31 @ Noon

Guest pianist Barbara McKenzie will launch WHQR's new Bach's Lunch series on Friday, March 31st . Whether you're a long time, sophisticated listener or someone looking for a rejuvenating lunch break, you'll enjoy gathering in the WHQR Gallery from Noon-1 to hear Barbara bring the joy and wonder of Bach's keyboard music to life. She'll expose the melodies and mysteries of Bach's G minor English Suite, a series of dances and jigs and share some interesting factoids about the Baroque master....

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Ben Newton from Australia - 24, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=10462693

Friday Feedback for March 24, 2017

Keegan Lester/instagram

Poet Keegan Lester is on a tour with his collection of poetry called this shouldn't be beautiful but it was & it was all i had so i drew it. This collection was published by Slope Editions after Keegan won the 2016 Slope Editions Book Prize. He's on a 28-date tour with the book, mostly sharing readings and signing books in bars and other locations outside the walls of academia. Keegan earned his MFA in Poetry at Columbia University, but this tour seems to represent a break with the university system he criticizes for constraining emerging poets through unyielding and outdated definitions of poetry. Listen above.

The Special Use Permit is on the agenda for Monday’s New Hanover County Board of Commissioners meeting. It’s comes up after a year of work by county staff and interested parties.

After almost a year of meetings, public hearings and work sessions, the New Hanover County Commissioners will discuss changes in the Special Use Permit or SUP, Monday afternoon.

Last month the county planning board voted 6 to 1 to approve the changes in the SUP and send it to the next level.

Aleks Karjaka

The New York Times calls him "gifted"; the Wall Street Journal says his performance is "dazzling." The LA Times proclaims him as "the next big organ talent." He hasn't hit 30 yet, but young Christopher Houlihan is taking the organ world by storm, and he's performing in Wilmington on Friday, March 10 at St. Paul's Episcopal Church. He drew a great deal of attention when he performed all 6 of Louis Vierne's organ symphonies in 2012, and he'll play excerpts (Scherzo, Cantabile, & Allegro) from Vierne's 2nd Symphony on Friday night, plus Vierne's Carillon de Westminster, J.S. Bach's Italian Concerto, and César Franck's Choral II in B minor

Thursday morning, North Carolina state legislators, including Representative Ted Davis, Junior (R-New Hanover County) and Senator Bill Rabon (R-Brunswick County), held a press conference to announce the introduction of the STOP Act.  It’s legislation intended to address the opioid epidemic in North Carolina by "ensuring smarter prescribing and dispensing of highly-addictive prescription drugs", according to bill sponsors.  The bill would also provide funding for treatment and recovery. 

Front Street Blues host Lan Nichols explores the newest release from one of North Carolina's most prolific blues artists of the new century, Randy McQuay. A three-time finalist of the International Blues Challenge in Memphis TN, Randy brought the IBC solo championship trophy back to Wilmington in 2015, leaving no question about his hard work and love of the  blues.

Nick Szuberla, Executive Director of Working Narratives, and the Lead Artist, Rend Smith, joined us to talk about a project they are doing in Wilmington: Free Movement. The key part of this project is the part public art event/part sustainable community building group called Black Man Running 5K. The group meets (and runs/walks) weekly, but on Saturday, March 11, 9:00am-4:00pm, they are throwing a big event at Hugh MacRae Park

On Friday, March 3rd the Wilmington StarNews published an editorial honoring Station Manager Cleve Callison on his decision to retire from WHQR. We here at WHQR appreciate the tribute. To read the editorial click HERE.

Alliance for Cape Fear Trees

          

How important are trees to a city’s landscape?  When you see the glorious oak trees in Carolina Heights in Wilmington, do you wonder how long it took them to grow?  Do you worry about the safety of those old trees and heavy limbs falling on roadways?  Do you think tree preservation gets in the way of development and economic growth in what is an urban area? 

As Wilmington enjoys a development boom – with hundreds of new apartment units, single-family homes, and commercial properties going up – what’s happening to the area’s trees? 

Some local activists in Wilmington and Southport are working to help municipalities do more to protect trees by advocating for rules that are clearer, more consistent, and more enforceable. 

City officials admit that Wilmington’s current development ordinance is a bit long in the tooth -- last updated in the 1980s.   And there is work underway to bring it up-to-date. 

On this edition of CoastLine, we learn about the particular challenges builders and developers face when building within city limits.  We also hear from advocates who are focused on the urgency of protecting trees in Wilmington and Southport. 

Guests: 

Bill Jayne served on the Wilmington Tree Commission, a twelve-member body, nine of them appointed by members of City Council, for six years.  He chaired the commission for two.  He is now a member of a relatively new local nonprofit Alliance for Cape Fear Trees.

Scott Len chairs the Southport Forestry Committee and is a member of the North Carolina Urban Forest Council.

Brian Chambers, Associate Planner, City of Wilmington

Cameron Moore, Executive Officer, Wilmington Cape Fear Home Builders Association

Resources: 

Wilmington Tree Commission:

It’s been an interesting week. One person wrote to accuse me of being a ‘minion of Satan’. A more polite listener, Jeff, wrote: “After a long history of listening to WHQR at work, unfortunately today I changed the radio station. I did this because your programming has been way to anti-trump and liberal recently. It appears that WHQR is trying to make some point about how terrible conservatives are. I have a feeling I'm not the only one switching the dial, however I realize that you will continue to have a strong liberal listener following as long as you continue to program to their agendas. I just thought you might want to know. I sure am going to miss Smooth Landings!”

New Hanover County

The five New Hanover County commissioners unveiled this year’s state of the county via a 12-minute video late yesterday afternoon, detailing their individual visions for the area.

It's the 2017 State of the County.

The overall message was one of enthusiasm and optimism.  The entire video featured a music soundtrack, as well.

“I’m so excited about the things that we’re doing from a quality of life perspective."

That's Commissioner Jonathan Barfield.

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The Latest News From NPR

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Former Penn State president Graham Spanier was convicted Friday of child endangerment for his role in the sexual abuse scandal involving former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky.

In a split verdict, the Pennsylvania jury found that Spanier's handling of a 2001 complaint alleging abuse by Sandusky, warranted conviction on one of three charges against him. The jury did, however, acquit Spanier of conspiracy and a second count of child endangerment, the Associated Press reports.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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In the MC Erny Gallery

The MC Erny Gallery Presents "Line and Paper"

Opening Reception: Friday, March 24th 6-9 pm
Closing Reception: Friday, April 28th 6-9 pm
Show Closing on Friday, May 12th.

Cinematique Presents

Cinématique Presents "Toni Erdmann"

Monday, March 27 - Wednesday, March 29
3pm and 7pm
The Ruth and Bucky Stein Theatre

WHQR's Spring 2017 Listener Survey

Prologue

Prologue

With Stephen Glaser
Monday, April 10th, 7 pm
The MC Erny Gallery at WHQR

What's Happening in Your Community?

WHQR Commentary

WHQR Commentary: "How Much for One Oxford Comma, Please?"

Thanks to texting and voice recognition technology, commas are going the way of the dinosaur, but commentator Peggy Porter is here to remind us that that neglected comma may come back to bite you. Time now for today's WHQR Commentary. Here's Peggy Porter. Peggy Porter is a long-time resident of New Hanover County, and a former teacher of U.S. History and Civics. You can hear more from Peggy and our other commentators at our website: WHQR DOT O-R-G. Just click "Commentary."

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