National

Middle East
5:07 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Journalist Austin Tice Still Missing In Syria After More Than 1,000 Days

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 7:06 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Two-Way
5:00 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Wanna Go To Fit City? List Ranks America's 50 Fittest Metro Areas

People exercise along the Reflecting Pool on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.; the metro area was ranked as America's fittest city for the second year in a row.
Andrew Harnik The Washington Times/Landov

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 9:44 am

The new American Fitness Index is out, with some good news and bad news. Five metro areas fell five or more slots; nine others rose by five or more places. The rankings tally several criteria, from rates of smoking, diabetes and obesity to access to parks.

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The Two-Way
4:47 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

LA City Council Votes To Raise Minimum Wage To $15 By 2020

The Los Angeles City Council voted today to raise the hourly minimum wage in the second-largest U.S. city from $9 to $15 by 2020 — a move that would cover as many as 800,000 people.

The Los Angeles Times has more on the vote:

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Politics
4:30 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

State Department To Release Hillary Clinton Emails By January 2016

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 7:06 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Around the Nation
4:30 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Clinical Psychologist To Head Chicago's Cook County Jail

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 7:06 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Politics
4:30 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

As States Ready Disaster Plans, Feds Urge Them To Consider Climate Change

Demolition crews remove the last remains of a house that was destroyed by Superstorm Sandy, which battered parts of the East Coast, in 2013.
Wayne Parry AP

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 7:06 pm

The Atlantic hurricane season starts next month — a time when coastal states have their disaster plans at the ready. Now, the federal government wants states to consider the potential effects of climate change in those blueprints.

States lay out strategies for reducing harm from a whole host of calamities that might strike, such as hurricanes, earthquakes, floods, or drought.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency, FEMA, gives states money to mitigate those risks — grants that might help pay for tornado safe rooms, or to elevate buildings in a flood zone, for instance.

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National Security
4:30 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Fall Of Ramadi Sparks New Criticism Over U.S. Strategy In Iraq

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 7:06 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

We're joined now by NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman. And Tom, we just heard in Alice's report that Shiite militias are the units looking to help retake the city of Ramadi. Is that something the U.S. government would support?

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The Two-Way
3:51 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

As Congress Haggles Over Patriot Act, We Answer 6 Basic Questions

The National Security Agency campus in Fort Meade, Md.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 8:18 pm

The rest of the month is setting up to be pretty dramatic in the Senate.

A key section of the Patriot Act — the part of law the White House uses to conduct mass surveillance on the call records of Americans — is set to expire June 1. That leaves legislators with a big decision to make: Rewrite the statute to outlaw or modify the practice or extend the statute and let the National Security Agency continue with its work.

As the Senate debates, we answer six questions that'll get you up to speed:

1. What's Congress debating here?

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Shots - Health News
3:42 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Dense Breasts Are Just One Part Of The Cancer Risk Calculus

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 1:00 pm

Almost half the states now require doctors to tell women if they have dense breasts because they're at higher risk of breast cancer, and those cancers are harder to find. But not all women with dense breasts have the same risks, a study says.

Those differences need to be taken into account when figuring out each woman's risk of breast cancer, the study says, and also weighed against other factors, including family history, age and ethnicity.

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The Two-Way
2:51 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Takata Agrees To Declare Air Bags Defective In Nearly 34M Vehicles

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 4:05 pm

Updated at 3:13 p.m. ET

Japanese air bag supplier Takata says nearly 34 million vehicles were fitted with its defective inflator mechanisms, doubling the number of vehicles affected in the U.S., the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said Tuesday.

The recall is believed to be the largest in NHTSA's history.

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