National

Shots - Health News
9:45 am
Thu April 23, 2015

Critics Lash Out At Chinese Scientists Who Edited DNA In Human Embryos

iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 12:34 pm

For the first time, scientists have edited DNA in human embryos, a highly controversial step long considered off limits.

Junjiu Huang and his colleagues at the Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou, China, performed a series of experiments involving 86 human embryos to see if they could make changes in a gene known as HBB, which causes the sometimes fatal blood disorder beta-thalassemia.

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NPR Ed
8:03 am
Thu April 23, 2015

To Get More Students Through College, Give Them Fewer Choices

Redesigning America's Community Colleges: A Clearer Path to Student Success by Thomas R. Bailey, Shanna Smith Jaggars and Davis Jenkins
Harvard University Press

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 11:18 am

How many different flavors of jam do you need to be happy?

In 2000, a famous experiment showed that when people were presented with a supermarket sampler of 24 exotic fruit flavors, they were more attracted to the display. But, when the sample included only six flavors, they were 10 times more likely to actually buy.

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The Two-Way
7:31 am
Thu April 23, 2015

Petraeus Sentenced To 2 Years' Probation, Fine For Sharing Classified Info

Former CIA Director and retired Gen. David Petraeus was sentenced Thursday to two years of probation and must pay a $100,000 fine.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 11:37 am

Updated at 11:34 a.m. ET Friday

Former CIA Director and retired Gen. David Petraeus was sentenced Thursday to two years of probation and handed a $100,000 fine for the unauthorized removal and retention of classified material, in the form of notebooks he shared with his lover.

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The Two-Way
6:38 am
Thu April 23, 2015

Michael Brown's Parents File Civil Suit Against Ferguson And Former Officer

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 5:34 pm

The parents of Michael Brown, the unarmed man whom a Ferguson, Mo., police officer shot and killed last August, have filed a civil lawsuit against the city, along with former police chief Thomas Jackson and Darren Wilson, the now-former officer who shot Brown, 18.

The lawsuit was filed by Michael Brown Sr. and Lesley McSpadden at the St. Louis County Courthouse Thursday morning. It says Wilson "unjustifiably shot and killed" Brown, using "an unnecessary and unreasonable" amount of force.

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Shots - Health News
5:08 am
Thu April 23, 2015

More Whistleblowers Say Health Plans Are Gouging Medicare

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 12:29 pm

Privately run Medicare plans, fresh off a lobbying victory that reversed proposed budget cuts, face new scrutiny from government investigators and whistleblowers who allege that plans have overcharged the government for years.

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It's All Politics
5:06 am
Thu April 23, 2015

A Black Eye, A Middle Finger And Other Tales From A White House Press Secretary

Courtesy of Hachette Book Group

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 11:23 am

Being a White House press secretary sometimes requires taking a black eye or two for your boss — in this case, the president of the United States. Dana Perino learned that lesson the hard way. She served at the end of President George W. Bush's second term, and she's out with a new book, And The Good News Is ..., about her life and her time at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave.

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Around the Nation
4:25 am
Thu April 23, 2015

Oklahomans Feel Way More Earthquakes Than Californians; Now They Know Why

Austin Holland, research seismologist at the Oklahoma Geological Survey, gestures to a chart of Oklahoma earthquakes in June 2014 as he talks about recent earthquake activity at his offices at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Okla. The state had three times as many earthquakes as California last year.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 2:25 pm

A magnitude-3.0 earthquake is small, but most people can feel it. Historically, Oklahoma got less than two of those a year, but in 2013 it became two a week.

It's only gotten more active since then — last year, the state had three times as many earthquakes as in the entire seismically active state of California.

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U.S.
4:22 am
Thu April 23, 2015

Some Companies Fight Pay Gap By Eliminating Salary Negotiations

Women stage a protest demanding equal pay for women at a 2012 rally in Miami.
J Pat Carter AP

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 10:56 am

When it comes to negotiating salaries, the research is pretty clear: women are less assertive than men. It's one reason women who start their careers with a narrower pay gap see it widen over time.

Carnegie Mellon economics professor Linda Babcock, who studies the gender pay gap, says men are four times more likely to negotiate their pay. That keeps women at a disadvantage, though they're not always aware of it.

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The Salt
4:22 am
Thu April 23, 2015

Fruit Growers Try Tricking Mother Nature To Prevent Crop Damage

A cherry tree and its blossoms are covered with snow in an orchard near Traverse City, Mich. Three years ago, almost every fruit crop in Michigan was frozen out when cold temperatures followed some 80 degree days in March.
John L. Russell AP

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 7:41 am

Fruit growers in northern Michigan grow apples, peaches and wine grapes. But the big crop here is tart cherries.

More than half of Ken Engle's 140-acre farm is planted with what he calls sour cherries.

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It's All Politics
7:06 pm
Wed April 22, 2015

Visiting The Everglades, Obama Takes Swipe At Climate Change Deniers

"Part of the reason we're here is because climate change is threatening this treasure and the communities that depend on it," Obama said Wednesday of his visit to Everglades National Park in Florida. "If we don't act, there may not be an Everglades as we know it."
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

President Obama used the backdrop of the Florida Everglades this Earth Day to highlight the dangers posed by a changing climate. He also took a swipe at Florida's Republican governor, who's been accused of discouraging state workers from discussing global warming.

"Climate change can no longer be denied," Obama said. "It can't be edited out. It can't be omitted from the conversation. And action can no longer be delayed."

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