National

National Security
5:25 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Before Snowden: The Whistleblowers Who Tried To Lift The Veil

Over the last dozen years, whistleblowers at the National Security Agency have had a rough track record, facing FBI raids and lawsuits.
NSA Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 1:13 pm

Bill Binney worked at the National Security Agency nearly three decades as one of its leading crypto-mathematicians. He then became one of its leading whistleblowers.

Now 70 and on crutches, both legs lost to diabetes, Binney recalls the July morning seven years ago when a dozen gun-wielding FBI agents burst through the front door of his home, at the end of a cul-de-sac a 10-minute drive from NSA headquarters in Fort Meade, Md.

"I first knew that they were in there when they were pointing a gun at me as I was coming out of the shower," Binney says.

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The Two-Way
5:25 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Rubio: U.S. Cannot Admit All Children Seeking Asylum

Rubio, seen here addressing the National Press Club in May, told NPR he'll decide on a presidential run in the next few months
Alex Wong Getty

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 1:24 pm

Sen. Marco Rubio argued that the nation's immigration laws need to be overhauled and said that Hillary Clinton would be a flawed candidate for president.

"I just think she's a 20th century candidate," he said. "I think she does not offer an agenda for moving America forward in the 21st century, at least not up till now."

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NPR Story
5:25 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Telecommuting Didn't Work Out For One Transplanted Worker

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 1:13 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This summer, we're also focusing on the high rate of youth unemployment and hearing what some out-of-work younger adults are doing to make ends meet. Christina Gastlelum is 32. She recently moved to Maine from New York City. She tried to keep doing her job as vice president of a nonprofit remotely which did not work out.

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U.S.
4:45 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Other Cities Poach Police From Detroit's Low-Wage Force

Officer Michael Crowder says his roots are too deep to leave Detroit, but he knows younger officers who were lured away by better pay.
Dawn Uhl-Zifilippo

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 3:11 pm

In a Detroit police squad car, Officer Michael Crowder cruises through one of the city's more well-to-do neighborhoods.

Crowder says he loves his current assignment — concentrating on a specific neighborhood community. But he notes that these are tough economic times in Detroit, and that's effecting everyone here — including the police.

"We've had food drives where the community comes up to the precinct," he says. "They'll give us baskets of food. Two, three years now, we've had officers depend on Goodfellow packages."

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All Tech Considered
6:35 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Net Neutrality, Shall I Compare Thee To A Highway? A Showerhead?

Members of global advocacy group Avaaz stand next to a digital counter showing the number of petition signatures calling for net neutrality outside the Federal Communication Commission in Washington in January. Avaaz joined other groups to deliver more than a million signatures for a free and open Internet to the FCC.
Kevin Wolf AP

The Federal Communications Commission says it's writing rules for the Internet to preserve the status quo.

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The Two-Way
5:51 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Hospital Settles Lawsuit By Thousands Of Women Over Exam Photos

The Johns Hopkins Health System will pay $190 million to former patients of a gynecologist who used a small camera to secretly film examinations, in one of the the largest sexual misconduct settlements involving a physician.

The Baltimore-based hospital is settling a class-action lawsuit that includes more than 7,000 women and at least 62 minors; more women will likely register with the suit.

From member station WYPR, Christopher Connelly reports:

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The Salt
4:58 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

For These Vegans, Masculinity Means Protecting The Planet

Mixed martial arts fighter Cornell Ward (from left), chef Daniel Strong, triathlete Dominic Thompson, lifestyle blogger Joshua Katcher and competitive bodybuilder Giacomo Marchese at a vegan barbecue in Brooklyn, N.Y.
Courtesy of James Koroni

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 2:32 pm

Real men eat meat. They kill it and then they grill it.

That's the stereotype, or cliche, that's about as old as time.

At a recent barbecue in Brooklyn, N.Y., a half-dozen guys who resist that particular cultural stereotype gathered together. Many of them are muscled semi-professional athletes, including triathlete Dominic Thompson, competitive bodybuilder Giacomo Marchese and mixed martial arts fighter Cornell Ward.

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All Tech Considered
4:54 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

1 Million Net Neutrality Comments Filed, But Will They Matter?

Complaints about Janet Jackson's Super Bowl halftime show performance of 2004 led to a record number of public interactions with the Federal Communications Commission. This year's net neutrality comments come in second.
Donald Miralle Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 8:16 pm

The Federal Communications Commission received more than 1 million public comments on the issue of net neutrality during a five-month commenting period that ended Friday.

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Shots - Health News
4:47 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

High-Performing Charter Schools May Improve Students' Health

Researchers are just starting to look at how school choice affects health.
romester/iStockphoto

Many people are intensely interested in how publicly funded charter schools affect children, and that includes not just their academic achievement but their health.

Researchers from UCLA and the Rand Corp. wanted to know whether attending a high-performing charter school reduced the rates of risky health behaviors among low-income minority teenagers.

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National Security
4:30 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

In Bloody Battle, Medal Of Honor Recipient Held His Post Alone

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 6:35 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

At the White House today, President Obama awarded the nation's highest award for combat bravery. He presented the Medal of Honor to former Sergeant Ryan Pitts. In 2008, Pitts fought off a large Taliban force at an Afghan outpost. He did this for a time alone and wounded until the Americans could turn the tide of the battle.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: As one of his teammates said, had it not been for Ryan Pitts, that post almost certainly would've been overrun.

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