Local

City of Wilmington

New Hanover, Brunswick, and Pender County Schools are all closed Monday.  Cape Fear Community College has also closed all of its campus locations.  City of Wilmington, New Hanover County, and Brunswick County Offices and Courts are closed. 

This is hardly an exhaustive list, but it illustrates the point:  driving conditions are hazardous due to flooding and the potential for downed trees.

By Tuesday, a drying trend will set in, which makes Monday the last day the area will see significant heavy rainfall from the current systems. 

National Hurricane Center / NOAA

Now that Hurricane Joaquin's projected path turns farther east, as the European meteorological models had predicted, state and local emergency management officials say they’re more confident the storm will stay well offshore.  But there are still statewide warnings about flooding and its ancillary effects.

U.S. Geological Survey

Storm surge, coastal flooding, and beach erosion.  Those are the likely impacts from the combination of a wet system moving up from the Gulf of Mexico and the arrival of Hurricane Joaquin – now a Category Four storm.  But New Hanover County Emergency officials say it won’t be until Friday afternoon that they’ll have any confidence in the forecast track for Joaquin.

Hurricane Joaquin, now a dangerous Category Four storm, is still highly unpredictable.  In preparation for potentially severe weather and heavy flooding, Governor Pat McCrory declared a state of emergency for all 100 counties in North Carolina.

National Hurricane Center

No one can say with certainty yet how much Hurricane Joaquin will impact the Cape Fear region.  But at the very least, serious flooding is high on the probability scale.

There a few reasons for that.  Steven Pfaff is a Warning Coordination Meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Wilmington.  He says the situation that’s unfolding now is complex.  If Joaquin stays on the current track, this area could see breezy conditions along the coast – but, says Pfaff, it’s the potential for flooding that’s a serious concern. 

This CoastLine Candidate Forum of 2015 features the candidates for Oak Island Town Council.  Due to the size of this race, we allotted two hours, with a short break at the top of the hour, so that you can hear the candidates discuss a broader range of issues.  

Isabelle Shepherd, WHQR

This November, voters will choose from eight candidates to fill three open seats on Wilmington City Council. At the candidate forum hosted by Residents of Old Wilmington and the Downtown Business Alliance, the candidates discussed local transportation issues.   

Alvin Rogers has served on the Wilmington Planning Commission. He remembers when Oleander Drive was just a two lane road, and he thinks transportation has become a problem throughout Wilmington. 

Bureau of Ocean Energy Management / T. J. Boyle and Associates

While still years away, offshore wind farms are significantly closer to becoming reality off the North Carolina coast.  The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management recently completed its environmental assessment and will hold a Task Force meeting October 7th in Wilmington to consider next steps.  Two of the areas slated for wind are near the southeastern North Carolina coast. 

Wikimedia Commons

This summer, shark bites brought national attention to North Carolina beaches. Two young people lost parts of their arms to sharks while swimming near Oak Island. During this week’s CoastLine Candidate Forum, all Oak Island Mayoral candidates agreed that more needs to be done to lower the risk of shark attacks. 

All four mayoral candidates say this summer’s shark bites were a wakeup call for Oak Island. Cin Brochure, the current Tourism Director for the City of Southport, says the issue has been on her mind since she lives near one of the sites: 

Okko Pyykkö

Four people are vying for the mayoral seat in the Town of Oak Island.  This Brunswick County coastal town sits largely on a barrier island and has a year-round population of nearly seven-thousand people.  That number more than quintuples during the busy summer season. 

During a recent CoastLine Candidate Forum, all four candidates said they think transparency in government is critical.  But they didn’t all agree on whether the current government is adequately open or on how to improve transparency. 

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