Wikimedia Commons

A man is in the hospital after yet another shark attack off the North Carolina coast just after noon on Wednesday.  The victim sustained multiple injuries.

Wikimedia Commons

Did you know that the great jazz singer and bandleader Cab Calloway has played Wilmington? 


The Williston Alumni Association is celebrating the Wilmington school’s 100th anniversary. 


When a shark (or sharks) seriously injures two young swimmers near a local beach, a new company announces plans to provide a significant spike in jobs, or a community group demands the Confederate flag be banned in the county, it’s local reporters that bring you those stories. 

In this edition of CoastLine, we talk with two key players on the local news scene. 


Anthropologist Monroe Fisher's African trail was called one of the "world’s best hikes" by the National Geographic. His new project, Carolina Rivers, has begun documenting 32 rivers of North and South Carolina. He was our our guest on CoastLine on June 17th, 2015.

photographer: Billy Hathorn

New Hanover County residents will see a two-cent property tax increase in the next fiscal year. 

Audubon North Carolina

Oystercatchers, Black Skimmers, Least Terns, Willets, and Common Terns.  They’re all shore birds.  They’re all listed as species of special concern in North Carolina.  And they’re all nesting in colonies at the tip of Wrightsville Beach. 

City of Wilmington

A North Carolina Court of Appeals has ruled in favor of the City of Wilmington on the embattled Convention Center Hotel.  

Renowned Anthropologist Sets Out to Explore Carolina Rivers

Jun 16, 2015
Julian Monroe Fisher (www.carolinarivers.com)

Anthropologist Julian Monroe Fisher has explored all of Africa, but now he’s turning his attention to his own backyard. The Wilmingtonian will spend the next two years traversing 32 Carolina rivers. 

Julian Monroe Fisher has spent the last fifteen years doing anthropological research in Africa. But when he was home in North Carolina, he kept passing over rivers and wondering where they came from and where they’re going. That curiosity led him to design his most recent project, Carolina Rivers Education and Preservation through Exploration:

Richard Ling, Wikimedia Commons

In the past week, there have been three shark attacks in Brunswick County – two of them causing serious injuries. A local fisheries expert has a theory about why these attacks keep occurring south of the Cape Fear River’s mouth. 

Dr. Frederick Scharf is a professor of Marine Biology at UNCW. He says the area of these recent attacks is rich in food sources for sharks. That’s because the outflow from the Cape Fear River tends to bend south—right along the Oak Island beaches. That stream of water releases nutrients and suspended solids—fish food, essentially—into the coastal ocean.