The Splendid Table

Saturdays 7AM-8AM, 1PM-2PM
  • Hosted by Lynne Rossetto Kasper

The Splendid Table is a culinary, culture, and lifestyle one-hour program that celebrates food and its ability to touch the lives and feed the souls of everyone. Each week, award-winning host Lynne Rossetto Kasper leads listeners on a journey of the senses and hosts discussions with a variety of writers and personalities who share their passion for the culinary delights.

David Bedford (Photo: Dave Hansen)

If there is such a thing as a superstar apple breeder, David Bedford is one of them. He and his team at the University of Minnesota are responsible for game-changing apples like Honeycrisp, SweeTango, and Zestar. He joined Lynne Rossetto Kasper in The Splendid Table studios for an apple tasting, including the Rave/First Kiss, which will be released in 2017.

[Ed. note: You can check out The Splendid Table's apple recipe collection here.]

Molly Yeh (Photo: Chantell Quernemoen)

How does a Juilliard-trained musician end up writing a cookbook from her farm on the North Dakota-Minnesota border? David Leite asks Molly Yeh all about it (and gets the recipe for Fried Cheesy Pickles).

David Leite:I want to start off by talking about this journey that you have taken. You were a Juilliard-trained timpanist living in New York, and now you are the farm wife married to Eggboy [Ed. note: her husband Nick] on his family's farm, raising sugar beets, all the way out in Minnesota. How does one go from there to here?

Tunde Wey (Moyo Oyelola)

Tunde Wey is using the food of his native Nigeria to start conversations about America and race. He tells Von Diaz about his own immigrant experiences and what he thinks his Blackness in America dinners can accomplish.

Von Diaz: Tunde, you were picked up by immigration enforcement some years ago. Can you tell me what happened?


Molly Birnbaum, executive editor of Cook's Science for America's Test Kitchen, turns her attention to mushrooms. She tells Sally Swift how these fungi bridge the gap between plant and animal, why fresh doesn't equal better flavor, and what happens to a mushroom after you cook it for 40 minutes.

[More from Birnbaum]

Sally Swift: What's on your mind today?

Molly Birnbaum


Award-winning restaurant critic Patric Kuh explores the soaring popularity of so-called "artisanal" food and drinks in his new book, Finding the Flavors We Lost. He talks with Russ Parsons about why those flavors went away, what artisanal actually means, and why small doesn't always mean better.

An unexpectedly sweet use for fig leaves

Sep 28, 2016
Jose Santiago/Thinkstock

In Dandelion & Quince, author Michelle McKenzie explores the uses of some non-standard herbs, fruits, and vegetables. Here, she tells The Splendid Table's Noelle Carter about her tomatillo-inspired green fish stew and the unexpectedly sweet use she's found for fig leaves.

The business and beauty of Sylvia Weinstock's artisan cakes

Sep 28, 2016
Caryle Murphy

Sylvia Weinstock's artisan wedding and birthday cakes have traveled from her New York City boutique to locales as far-flung as Bahrain and Johannesburg. She tells The Splendid Table contributor Melanie Dunea about what inspires her creations, what keeps her going, and how she learned to make one of her signature flourishes.

[You can also explore The Splendid Table's cake collection here.]

Natto: 'It's like a vegan stinky cheese.'

Sep 28, 2016

Natto is fermented soybeans, and it's been popular in Japan for over a thousand years. Ann Yonetani tells The Splendid Table's Von Diaz how it gets its "special sauce," and why it might be exactly the thing for a vegan looking for a pungent cheese alternative.

Von Diaz: I recently tried your natto, and I have to say it's a little hard to describe. How would you describe it?

Turmeric basics with Julie Sahni

Sep 28, 2016

Turmeric is the latest poster child for the healthy living movement, thanks to its reputed anti-inflammatory properties. It's also a staple spice in Indian food, which is why The Splendid Table's David Leite asked legendary author and cooking teacher Julie Sahni to tell us a little more about it.

David Leite: Poor, misunderstood turmeric. Not a lot of people know what to do with it, so why don't we start from the beginning. What exactly is turmeric?

Delmonico Restaurant, New York City, 1898 (Photo: Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Food historian Paul Freedman's book, Ten Restaurants That Changed America, tells the history of American restaurants (and America itself, for that matter) through those ten establishments. He tells Lynne Rossetto Kasper why Howard Johnson's is on the list, why McDonald's isn't, and how New York City's famed Delmonico's started it all.

Lynne Rossetto Kasper: Which ten restaurants did you choose?