Classics for Kids

Mon 12:00 - 1:00 pm
  • Hosted by Naomi Lewin

Classics for Kids debuted December 5, 1998 and is designed to help adults introduce children to classical music. The program features a composer and his/her music, along with games, quizzes and curriculum materials for primary grade school students and teachers.

Click here for supplemental reading and listening material!

Listener Dory wrote:

I prefer public radio formats in which there are two stations--one news/talk programming and one music programming. Since the second WHQR station is HD (and not available to all), it makes sense to mix news and music programming on the flagship station. However, I'd love it if the music was more diverse--indie music, singer-songwriters, Alt-Latino, "college music." As it stands, the music programming seems almost entirely focused on older demographics.

Anonymous wrote:

We’ve been getting some comments and calls this week about Morning Edition sounding distorted at times, especially for Lumberton listeners. Our equipment is working correctly. What many are hearing is a phenomenon known as “tropospheric ducting,” which can play havoc with FM signals. Graduate Fellow Jason Hess discovered a great online resources for “ducting” forecasts. Yesterday's map for Southeastern North Carolina, for example, showed us in a bright orange area, meaning “very strong” to “intense”.

You Are Beautiful

Dec 5, 2013

Fresh Voices commentator Callie Hill overcomes society’s obsession with physical perfection and discovers her own definition of beauty. 

Callie Hill is 15 years old and was born and raised in Wilmington, North Carolina.  She’s an honor student at New Hanover High School where she participates in Key Club and Literary Club. She has a twin brother who plays baseball at New Hanover and supports him by going to every game. 

Transitive Love

Nov 5, 2013
Jason Hess

Fresh Voices On-Air debuts with Andrew Escobar’s Transitive Love.  A six-year-old boy manages to satisfy his desire for a mouse, his first pet, only to realize that the true treasure lies beyond his immediate vision.

Andrew Escobar is 16 years old, and is a Junior at Isaac Bear Early College High School.  He enjoys soccer and reading and is active in his church youth group where he plays drums.  He aspires to become an innovative engineer in the near future.