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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

OK, let's stay in Texas now, where after two decades of futility, the Dallas Cowboys are back on top of the NFL. And commentator Frank Deford says, love them or hate them, this is a good thing.

Editor's note: There is language in this piece that some will find offensive.

Sometime in early 2016 between a Trump rally in New Hampshire, where a burly man shouted something at me about being Muslim, and a series of particularly vitriolic tweets that included some combination of "raghead," "terrorist," "bitch" and "jihadi," I went into my editor's office and wept.

I cried for the first (but not the last) time this campaign season.

The last unfinished Senate race of the election is nearly over.

State Treasurer John Neely Kennedy, a Republican, is the clear favorite to become the next Senator from Louisiana, despite an eleventh-hour fundraising surge from his Democratic opponent, Public Service Commissioner Foster Campbell.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The stock price of Boeing recovered yesterday after briefly dropping. It fell when President-elect Trump called for canceling a contract with Boeing for a new Air Force One, a contract of, quote, "$4 billion." Afterward, Boeing said its existing contract is for much, much less.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Donald Trump took to Twitter yesterday to criticize Boeing, saying the cost of a future fleet of presidential aircraft was just too high. He then spoke to reporters in the lobby of Trump Tower.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Pfizer faces record fine in the UK over epilepsy drug

10 hours ago

On today's show, we'll talk about how the Trump administration might handle the proposed $85 billion merger between AT&T and Time Warner; a decline in mortgage applications; Pfizer's record fine in the U.K. over an epilepsy drug; and Japanese tourists who are trying to learn more about Pearl Harbor. 

When the Japanese struck Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga (then Aiko Yoshinaga) was a senior at Los Angeles High School.

She remembers the day the following spring that her principal took the Japanese students aside and said, "You're not getting your diplomas because your people bombed Pearl Harbor."

Japanese-American families on the West Coast were rounded up and sent to internment camps. Yoshinaga was worried that she would be separated from her boyfriend, so to the horror of her parents, Yoshinaga and her boyfriend eloped.

The Department of Labor has guidelines for companies that want to keep unpaid interns. Essentially, unpaid interns have to be treated like students and shouldn't do the work of paid employees.

Those rules, however, don't apply to government agencies.

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JaeRan Kim

There are five Saturdays in December this year. Why is that significant? You get an extra day for last-minute shopping. But if the holiday sales season feels extra-long this year, it’s not just because of the calendar. Stores are offering deals earlier. But is that sustainable?

Click the above audio player to hear the full report. 

Every December, Miami's annual Art Basel fair draws artists, dealers and buyers from around the world. This year, dozens of artists could be found not in galleries or at cocktail parties, but painting at an elementary school.

Spanish painter Marina Capdevila was one of more than 30 artists working at Eneida Hartner Elementary School in Miami's Wynwood neighborhood.

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