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Parallels
5:03 am
Mon May 25, 2015

An Island Wonders: Why Are The Sharks Attacking So Often?

Surfer Alexis Gazzo (left) is helping train specialized lifeguards who will survey the waters around popular beaches in Reunion for sharks. Shark attacks have gone up sharply along the coast of the Indian Ocean island, with seven people killed in recent years.
Emma Jacobs for NPR

Originally published on Mon May 25, 2015 8:53 am

The 850,000 people who live on the island of Reunion, which lies east of Madagascar, depend on the Indian Ocean that surrounds them. Most homes are near the sea, fishing is a major industry and beaches attract tourists.

But the ocean has also become a source of dread to this French island. Since 2011, sharks have attacked 16 people, killing seven of them. It's a sharp jump from previous years and has left islanders at a loss to understand why.

Bishop Talon, 22, was attacked off a beach called Étang-Sale in February. She died a few hours later from her injuries.

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Parallels
3:59 am
Mon May 25, 2015

Trying To Organize A Marathon, An Arab-Israeli Woman Runs Into Opposition

Haneen Radi, an Arab Israeli, wants to organize a marathon for her town of Tira, but was told the run couldn't include women. When she insisted, she received threats, and the back window of her car was shot out.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Mon May 25, 2015 8:08 am

Haneen Radi learned to run by walking.

"I used to walk," says the 36-year-old mother of four. "I saw people running and said, I'll try that."

Radi took off. In the decade since then she's finished eight marathons, and she now coaches a girls' running club with 80 members.

"I'm another person when running," Radi says. "I'm happy, I'm smiling."

A few months ago, Radi decided to organize a marathon in Tira, her hometown in northern Israel.

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Photography
3:43 am
Mon May 25, 2015

It's Not Rude: These Portraits Of Wounded Vets Are Meant To Be Stared At

Army Spc. Jerral Hancock sits for a portrait with his son Julius. It is believed that Hancock was trapped under the wreckage of his Army tank for half an hour before he was rescued.
Courtesy of David Jay/Unknown Soldier

Originally published on Mon May 25, 2015 8:35 am

It's impolite to stare. But when it comes to severely injured soldiers, maybe we don't look enough; or maybe we'd rather not see wounded veterans at all. That's the message you get from photographer David Jay's Unknown Soldier series. Jay spent three years taking portraits of veterans returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, but before that — for nearly 20 years — he was a fashion photographer. His stylish, artful images appeared in magazines like Vogue and Cosmopolitan.

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Back At Base
3:39 am
Mon May 25, 2015

On Memorial Day, Learning The Story Behind The Markers

A memorial honors Staff Sgt. John Henry McCarthy on the corner of Commonwealth Avenue and Colborne Road in Boston.
Jesse Costa WBUR

Originally published on Mon May 25, 2015 8:08 am

NPR — along with seven public radio stations around the country — is chronicling the lives of America's troops where they live. We're calling the project "Back at Base."

Walk through a town square this Memorial Day and you might just see a marker or monument commemorating sacrifice in war. On it: The name of an American who died in combat.

In some parts of the city of Boston, there are markers on nearly every corner.

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Shots - Health News
3:37 am
Mon May 25, 2015

Multiple Sclerosis Patients Stressed Out By Soaring Drug Costs

Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Originally published on Mon May 25, 2015 8:08 am

American medicine is heading into new terrain, a place where a year's supply of drugs can come with a price tag that exceeds what an average family earns.

Pharmacy benefit manager Express Scripts says last year more than half a million Americans racked up prescription drug bills exceeding $50,000.

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The Two-Way
2:27 am
Mon May 25, 2015

Juan Pablo Montoya Wins Second Indy 500

Juan Pablo Montoya, of Colombia, celebrates after winning the 99th running of the Indianapolis 500 at Indianapolis Motor Speedway on Sunday.
Darron Cummings AP

Originally published on Mon May 25, 2015 6:08 am

Juan Pablo Montoya came from last place to win the 99th running of the Indianapolis 500 at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway on Sunday.

It was his second victory at the Brickyard — the first was 15 years ago.

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News
1:00 am
Mon May 25, 2015

Cheaper fuel, cheaper flights. But not for you.

With the price of jet fuel at a low, the question is...where are the savings going?
Sabri Ben-Achour

A gallon of jet fuel will cost you around $1.66 a gallon these days. That’s down 40 percent from what it was this time last year.

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News
1:00 am
Mon May 25, 2015

At Harvard, even the meat smoker is smart

Peyton Nesmith, a teaching fellow, makes final preparations prior to the taste test between brisket cooked in a commercial competitor and one cooked by the Harvard smoker.
Sam Kaplan

On a quest to invent a smart smoker, a Harvard engineering class is partnering with Williams-Sonoma. Over the last few months, junior-year engineering students have smoked more than 200 pounds of brisket. The result? Well, as a self-admitted meat lover, I figured the only way to really know was to take a bite.

It wasn't hard to find the class. The mesquite aroma led me right to teaching assistant Peyton Nesmith. The Alabama native is tending a 300 pound, black, hour glass shaped ceramic smoker. The contraption is covered with wires, gadgets and gizmos.

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News
1:00 am
Mon May 25, 2015

Late springs warms up housing

Spring has sprung for the housing market.
Mitchell Hartman

Spring and summer are often a hopeful time for anyone involved in the housing economy. Houses show well; potential buyers go looking; homebuilders are building.

Bad winter weather in early 2015 made for a poor start to the year for housing. But figures for April suggest the housing economy might finally be on the rebound. “Improvement in housing really has been a missing piece to this recovery,” says Michael Baele, managing director of U.S. Bank’s wealth management division. “And we are encouraged to see some better numbers.”

Here are some key recent housing indicators:

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News
12:57 am
Mon May 25, 2015

The oil economy, as measured in hotdogs and U-Hauls

Brian Way, a U-Haul store manager, said the rental facility in Williston, N.D. had more customers leaving town than arriving. Way now works at a U-Haul in Fargo, N.D.
Annie Baxter

You can learn a lot about the economy in Williston, N.D., based on Mitch Petrasek’s recent hotdog consumption. 

When I met him in March outside the U-Haul where he was working in Williston, the capital of the state’s oil patch, he had eight dogs lined up on a grill.

“I'll eat two now, two for dinner and two for breakfast,” he says. The remaining two, he says, would be offered to his boss.

Petrasek’s diet did include a few other things, like power bars and granola bars — the kind of stuff that didn't need to be warmed up or refrigerated.

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