Music

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Fans of music that is fast and loud - really loud - have lost someone important.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ACE OF SPADES")

All year long, DJ Earworm files away little pieces of the year's biggest songs. Since 2007, he's taken those pieces and stitched them together to compose an annual mashup he calls "United State Of Pop."

What artist did you fall in love with in 2015? NPR's Audie Cornish invited three members of NPR Music's staff to tell her about one artist each discovered this year.

Jazz guitarist John Scofield has had a pretty remarkable career. Without even finishing music school, he found himself on the Carnegie Hall stage playing with jazz legends Chet Baker and Gerry Mulligan. Then it was on to Miles Davis, his own successful jazz-funk fusion groups, and even greater exposure playing with jam bands.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Adele's smash hit "Hello" broke all kinds of records when it was released in November.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "HELLO")

ADELE: (Singing) Hello, it's me.

Most nights, you can walk into a blues club and find a harmonica player blowing their heart out onstage. The wailing, honking sound associated with Western movies and juke joints is what many harp players have emulated for decades. But in the rarefied world of the harmonica, the earth has lately shifted on its axis — primarily because of one man.

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