Music

Shawn Amos had a Los Angeles childhood that was equal parts grit and glamor. He went to private schools and lived in a nice house, but it wasn't exactly in Mr. Rogers' neighborhood.

Tennessee Ernie Ford was fed up with the trappings of fame and the demands of the music business. It was 1955 and his label, Capitol Records, had threatened to sue him if he didn't make another record. He decided to fulfill his contract and leave. The song he ended up recording became a No. 1 hit, topping Billboard magazine's pop and country charts.

Our fondness for a song is often connected to a string of memories — when a lyric or a melody made the world feel larger, more full of possibility for a moment. When the artists who made the music are no longer with us, it can feel like a piece of that moment is lost, too.

courtesy Chamber Music Wilmington

Classical music in our area is seeing a renewed vigor on 96.7 Classical HQR, and in live concerts in our own MC Erny Gallery. A special live broadcast Friday at noon will feature the acclaimed Calidore String Quartet, in town to perform a full-length concert for our co-sponsor Chamber Music Wilmington.

It was the day before Thanksgiving in 1902 when the Philadelphia Orchestra made its debut at Carnegie Hall. Music by Tchaikovsky was on the program and on the podium was Fritz Scheel, the first leader of an orchestra founded just two years before.

How A Korean Jazz Festival Found A Huge Young Audience

Jan 12, 2016

It was like discovering a parallel reality.

After completing a sponsored trip to South Korea for music professionals in October, I stayed in the country, striking out on my own. I grabbed a train to the Jarasum International Jazz Festival, a couple hours from Seoul, and arrived in the middle of a set by the international power pairing of Paolo Fresu, Omar Sosa and Trilok Gurtu.

Soup to Nuts Live! welcomes The Keith Butler Trio, consisting of Cameron Tinklenberg on piano, Sean Howard on electric bass, and Keith Butler on drums. They have been playing for about a year and a half now and draw on influences from Bill Evans, Billy Strayhorn, Duke Ellington, John Coltrane, Mulgrew Miller, Roy Hargrove, Christian McBride, and many more. The group strives to honor jazz music’s rich history by focusing on swing, melody, and creativity. 

For more than a decade, Reeves Gabrels was David Bowie's go-to guitarist, playing in the rock band Tin Machine and crafting '90s Bowie on albums like Outside, Earthling and 'hours...' The world is mourning the visionary chameleon, who died Sunday at 69, but Gabrels also wants to remember Bowie's sense of humor.

"The picture I have in my head is of him cracking up in the studio," Gabrels says. "Because we just used to be able to make each other laugh."

I am a Bowie girl. Not literally: I'm a little too young to have swiped my face with glitter and run out in lime-green platforms to see David Bowie storming through America in 1972 and 1973 with the Spiders from Mars, when he sent queer and alien dispatches across a heartland primed for them by Stonewall and women's lib and the sexual revolution but also feeling the slap of the Silent Majority as the Nixon era lumbered on.

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