Local

Billy Hathorn

On the corner of Market and Third Streets, at the entrance to downtown Wilmington, there is a statue of George Davis.  He was the last Confederate Attorney General.  Third Street near Dock boasts a monument to soldiers of the Confederacy.

The StarNews recently wrote about streets in Wilmington’s Pine Valley neighborhood that are named after Confederate officers.  The namesakes include General Robert E. Lee, Lieutenant General Nathan Bedford Forrest, John D. Barry. 

https://www.donaldjtrump.com/ and http://governor.nc.gov/

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump held a rally today at Wilmington, North Carolina, where he emphasized the next president’s role in the future of the Supreme Court.

Donald Trump said that the next president could appoint as many as five Supreme Court justices.  He said gun rights are on the line:

"Hillary wants to abolish, essentially abolish the Second Amendment.  By the way, and if she gets to pick, if she gets to pick her judges, nothing you can do, folks.  Although the Second Amendment people, maybe there is, I don’t know."

Billy Hathorn (Own Work), CC-BY-SA-3.0, 07/30/2012

When the Confederate flag was removed from the grounds of the South Carolina Statehouse last year, it ignited a discussion in the American South about the role of Confederate memorialization.  But while there may be local discussions about removing Confederate monuments, it would take an act of North Carolina’s General Assembly to do so. 

Ildar Sagdejev / Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Department of Justice has visited Wilmington in response to at least two violent incidents between members of law enforcement and the community.  During those visits, DOJ officials evaluated local law enforcement practices and policies.  That scrutiny is occurring all across the United States, as it seems new cell phone videos showing excessive use of force by police – with people of color usually on the receiving end – seem to pop up with astonishing frequency. 

City of Wilmington

Back in January, the Wilmington Police Department and the New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office partnered with the University of North Carolina - Wilmington to conduct a series of community discussions.  Wilmington Mayor Bill Saffo hopes a new Community Relations Advisory Committee will continue that conversation between law enforcement officers and local citizens.  

So far, ten Community Dialogue Discussions have taken place, and there are ten more to go.  But Mayor Saffo says the dialogue can’t stop once the contract is finished with UNCW:

CoastLine: Real Estate in the Cape Fear Region

Jul 28, 2016
© Sanfranman59 / Wikimedia Commons /CC-BY-SA-2.5 / GFDL

We all know that the Wilmington area, including the housing market, suffered through the Great Recession 8 years ago. For many people, home values have climbed back up in the last few years. And all it takes is a drive around the area to see new construction in many areas, such as South 17th Street and Kerr Avenue in Wilmington, lifestyle communities in Brunswick county and elsewhere, and more. 

Guests: 

New Hanover County

Back in 2009, the New Hanover County Human Relations Department was shut down due to budget cuts.  Now, the county is joining forces with the City of Wilmington to reach out to the public in a new way.  Vice-Chairman Jonathan Barfield hopes the new Community Relations Advisory Committee will help improve relations between citizens and cops.

Barfield says the sheriff and police chief are doing a great job communicating with the public, but he still sees work to be done.  This view is supported, in part, by some recent interactions between his family and local law enforcement:

RLH

A 2015 assessment of cities in North Carolina with a population of 10,000 or more ranked Wilmington second after Asheville for crashes.  For every one minute a freeway lane is blocked due to a crash incident, four minutes of travel time are added.  About 30% of all crashes are secondary crashes -- caused after the initial crash -- possibly due to a sudden stop, distracted driving, or rubber-necking.  Those statistics are courtesy of Jessi Leonard, Division Traffic Engineer for the North Carolina Department of Transportation. 

    

This week’s inspection of the Cape Fear Memorial Bridge caused long delays and left many travelers wondering if more could be done. But the North Carolina Department of Transportation says some proposed solutions cause more problems than they fix. 

After Monday’s traffic congestion, some drivers requested onsite law enforcement officers to direct traffic. But NCDOT Division Engineer Karen Collette says that when that tactic has been employed in the past, it had adverse effects:

From the earliest days of European settlement, Wilmington and the Cape Fear region have been places of active military involvement. From the Revolution through the Civil War, from liberty ships in World War II to the relocation of the Battleship North Carolina, this area has seen its share and more of events that have shaped the military history of our country. In fact, there is a movement in progress to have Wilmington declared America’s first World War II city.

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