Duke Energy Progress

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A coalition of environmental groups is working to ignite local activism on the coal ash front.  

Roy Tennant

It will be another three weeks before Duke Energy must formally respond to accusations of illegally pumping coal ash waste into a tributary that connects to the Cape Fear River. 

Duke Energy Progress

Sixty-one million gallons:  that’s the amount of untreated wastewater from coal ash ponds that state regulators estimate poured into a tributary of the Cape Fear River.  

State regulators have issued a citation to Duke Energy for violating its wastewater permit in Chatham County.


The Department of Environment and Natural Resources is required to give the nation’s largest electric utility 30 days to respond to the notice of violation. 

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A new water line connecting homes and businesses in the Flemington Community to the area’s main water supply is now in the works. 

The Southern Environmental Law Center

The controversy surrounding the ongoing impact of coal ash pollution from Wilmington’s Sutton Energy Plant is intensifying.  A biologist commissioned by the Southern Environmental Law Center released a report today claiming that coal ash waste is elevating levels of selenium pollution in Sutton Lake. Environmental advocates say this is killing and deforming thousands of fish, and thus threatening local fishing and tourism industries.  WHQR’s Katie O’Reilly reports.

This December, Duke Energy Progress will retire the coal units at Wilmington’s Sutton Plant, and switch to more energy-efficient natural gas operations. But while those coal units are being decommissioned, Duke will keep their ash basins operational for what they say is a short time. However, local environmental advocates are pushing to excavate the ash immediately, as they say its chemical components could pose public health threats. WHQR’s Katie O’Reilly reports that the Sierra Club and Cape Fear River Watch have teamed up to launch a petition demanding a timetable from Duke.