Marketplace from APM

Mon-Fri 6:30PM – 7PM
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

American Public Media's Marketplace presents news on business, economics, and money for the rest of us.

More info on Marketplace

Playlist

June 30, 2015

6:27 PM
Hey Ya!
Artist : Outkast
Album : Speakerboxxx/The Love Below
Composer :
Label : Arista

A giant robot that shoots ... T-shirts?

Jul 31, 2015
Molly Wood

If the whole idea of creating a new sports entertainment league that will rival the UFC, WWE and NASCAR for sheer dollars, excitement and danger doesn't work out, the MegaBots can always do parties. It turns out that a MegaBot is a really good T-shirt cannon.

MegaBots is a startup, based in Oakland, California, doing the kind of work a lot of kids hope to be doing someday, too: building a 15-foot tall, 15,000-pound fighting robot, and hoping it'll become the centerpiece of a new global entertainment business.

The minimum wage debate

Jul 31, 2015
Marketplace Weekend Staff

Next weekend on Marketplace, guest host David Lazarus will take a look at the debate behind the minimum wage across the U.S. Does the minimum wage force companies to layoff low-paid employees? Or is a living wage fair to employees?

Have you ever lived on the minimum wage in your area? We want to hear your stories. Send us an email or reach us on Twitter, @MarketplaceWKND

Kai Ryssdal's 10th anniversary

Jul 31, 2015
Julian Burrell

This Friday marks the 10th anniversary of Kai Ryssdal hosting Marketplace.

To celebrate, Marketplace Senior Producer Sitara Nieves and and Executive Producer and Vice President Deborah Clark surprised him with a pop quiz:

What was his lead story 10 years ago?

What was the music for the numbers?

What was his personal admission on the broadcast?

To hear the answers, click on the audio player above.

Relativity Media goes into turnaround

Jul 31, 2015
Nova Safo

Hollywood studio Relativity Media has filed for bankruptcy after reportedly amassing more than $1 billion in debts. The company's assets amount to half of that, according to reports.

Employee compensation growth stalls out

Jul 31, 2015
Mitchell Hartman

The Labor Department reports that employee compensation — wages, salaries and benefits — increased 0.2 percent in the second quarter of 2015. The employment cost index increased 0.7 percent in the first quarter, and economists expected about the same pace of growth for the second quarter. The annual rate of compensation inflation was 2 percent in the second quarter, compared to 2.6 percent for the first quarter.

Kai Ryssdal

Joining us to talk about the week's business and economic news are Linette Lopez of Business Insider and Fusion's Felix Salmon. The big topics this week: the possibility of an interest rate hike this year, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen's dependence on data and corporate profits in the tech world. 

 

 

SoulCycle pedaling hard toward IPO

Jul 31, 2015
Gigi Douban

Another surprise in the IPO-announcement department: SoulCycle, a boutique cycling studio with locations concentrated around New York and California. It's been doing well, especially with the celebrity set, tripling its studios from 2012 to last year to 36. Profits more than tripled during that time to $26 million in 2014.

Do federal contractors save the government money?

Jul 31, 2015
Nancy Marshall-Genzer

Groups of federal contract workers have been walking off the job and holding protests every few months.  

It’s part of a campaign called Good Jobs Nation, backed by organized labor. It's pushing for a $15 an hour minimum wage for federal contract workers and union representation. The most recent demonstration was in Washington, in late July.

Marketplace for Friday, July 31, 2015

Jul 31, 2015

Airing on Friday, July 31, 2015: Have you gotten a raise lately? The Federal Reserve is interested. And boutique studio SoulCycle pedals hard toward an IPO.

Autonomous weapons and the eventual robot uprising

Jul 31, 2015
Molly Wood and Raghu Manavalan

This past week, Elon Musk, Stephen Hawking and about a thousand other artificial intelligence researchers signed a letter calling for a ban on autonomous weapons.

The remote-operated drones that we use in modern warfare can already fly virtually undetected and use advanced targeting systems to drop bombs on buildings and people below — but the key phrase is "remote-operated." A human is usually controlling the weapon from afar.

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