Rachel Lewis Hilburn

All Things Considered Host, CoastLine Host / Producer

Rachel Lewis Hilburn came to WHQR in the spring of 2011.  After serving as back-up host for Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Classical Music for a year, she was named News Director in July of 2012. 

She moved to Wilmington from Los Angeles, where she worked as a financial advisor for Morgan Stanley.  After joining the local ABC affiliate in Wilmington, she wrote and produced local TV newscasts, a 30-minute special program for the Cape Fear Museum showcasing its renovation and new exhibits, and independently wrote and produced a documentary on the lingering effects of the 1898 coup d'etat in Wilmington.   Before joining the staff, Rachel c0-produced Stories, Wine, and Cheese - a series of local, live storytelling events which aired on WHQR.  

Wikimedia Commons

A little more than a century ago, Jewish people around the world faced decisions that have proved critical in shaping the past century.  On this edition of CoastLine, we look at those decisions through the eyes of two historians who are launching a lecture series in January at the Temple of Israel’s Reibman Center in Wilmington.

Guests:

Carole Fink, Humanities Distinguished Professor of History Emerita, The Ohio State University;
Professor of History Emerita, University of North Carolina Wilmington

By Steven Nass - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=38869847

A federal court ruled earlier this year that two of North Carolina’s congressional districts, drawn in 2011, were unconstitutional because they were racially gerrymandered.  That case is to be argued before the U.S.

OpenSource.com on Flickr Creative Commons - https://www.flickr.com/photos/opensourceway/4427310974/

Economic development is the way municipalities, counties, states, and nations improve the quality of life for its citizens.  Economic growth is one element and can be a metric for measuring that.  In pursuit that growth, communities often lay out a blueprint – a vision – that details how they would like to see that growth unfold. 

"Crazy Thanksgiving" by Louish Pixel on Flickr Creative Commons -- https://www.flickr.com/photos/louish/

Did you vote for Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, Gary Johnson, or Jill Stein?

Are you pro-life or pro-choice?

How do you feel about immigration? Do you refer to people living in the United States illegally as illegal aliens or people who are undocumented?  

Throughout election season, Donald Trump referred to the media as "dishonest and crooked." But that assessment is not limited to the President-elect. 

North Carolina’s House District 18 – which includes New Hanover and Brunswick Counties – is one of the few regional races with a Democratic winner.  Incumbent Susi Hamilton will serve her district for a fourth term.

New Hanover County’s Board of Commissioners race was one of the more fiercely fought local races.  At the end of the night on Tuesday, it appeared as though the two incumbents, Republican Woody White and Democrat Jonathan Barfield, will keep their seats.

Patricia Kusek, who has served on the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority Board, is the newcomer and the second-highest vote-getter.  White took the most votes, garnering more than 18%, with Kusek coming in at nearly 17% and Jonathan Barfield coming in just behind Kusek – by a margin of about 14 votes. 

Brunswick County Boards Remain Republican

Nov 9, 2016

Board of Commissioners

Brunswick County’s Board of Commissioners had three out of five seats in play.  The county is made up of five districts, and all county residents vote for all districts. 

Brunswick County is majority Republican.  With unaffiliated voters making up the second largest voting bloc, any Democratic candidate has a steep mountain to climb.  And last night’s vote kept Brunswick County Commissioners reliably – and 100% Republican. 

RLH

Some have aptly described this Election Day – the voting part – not the counting ballots part – as the eye of the storm.  Around lunch time, anecdotal reports described trickles of voters around the region – after a relatively busy morning. 

Brenda and Bobby Hunt showed up at the polls just after 1 o’clock -- what they hoped would be a slow time to vote in Brunswick County – and they were right.  But line or no line, military veteran Bobby Hunt says exercising the right to vote is something he would not miss. 

The Brunswick County Board of Commissioners has three of its five districts in play this year; however all county residents vote for all the districts.   Three Democrats are hoping to win seats on what is currently an all-Republican Board in a very red county.

Pages